Phone drone

Discussion in 'Other Systems' started by Speedliner, Sep 6, 2017.

  1. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    This is a drone for smart phones, but can modular DSLRs using your phone as the "digital back" be around the corner?

     
  2. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    Uh... Like an Olympus Air?
     
  3. SVQuant

    SVQuant Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 20, 2015
    SF Bay Area, California, USA
    Sameer
    I think that he means one where the phone will snap into a lens system, but all images will be recorded directly to your phone using its sensor. A little different from the Air where the phone acts as a viewfinder/review screen.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2017
  4. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    Well it doesn't turn your phone into a drone. It is a drone that simply uses your phone for its camera. Considering the weight and size of most phones I would think a dedicated (small and light) camera like most drones have would be preferable and I don't see this as saving you any money by having the drone not have its own camera. PLUS is appears that once you snap in your phone you still need another phone or device to control the drone.

    As to using your phone as a digital back for a dSLR, that would only be a true digital back if you could remove the phone's lens to expose the sensor to the dSLR. Otherwise it is nothing more than a add one snap on lens for a phone which already exist in many forms & sizes.
     
  5. PeeBee

    PeeBee Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 17, 2012
    UK
    No good for my phone contract. I don't get enough airtime o_O:cool:
     
  6. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    Olympus Air is controlled by a phone. The phone isn't an element of a DSLR system.
     
  7. PeeBee

    PeeBee Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 17, 2012
    UK
    I think the idea would be that the lens and sensor are on the DSLR, whilst the docked phone acts as the processor and display. You could change the processor via apps and share images instantly.
     
  8. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    This seems like a distinction without a difference. Unless you want the sensor in the phone. In that case, people do that already. Award winning full length movies have been done using pro optics in front of mobile phone cameras
     
  9. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    Which is exactly what the Air is. It just doesn't look like a DSLR.
     
  10. PeeBee

    PeeBee Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 17, 2012
    UK
    Kind of. Doesn't the Air use a wireless connection? A wired dock interface would be much faster, plus you'd have an OVF in the DSLR.
     
  11. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    I see. While Samsung did put a mobile OS in some cameras, it was not a removable phone. There is the new Motorola Hasselblad attachment, too.
     
  12. PeeBee

    PeeBee Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 17, 2012
    UK
    The Air and the phone are 2 devices interconnected by the limitations of current wireless technologies. I don't have an Air, but I assume it creates an SSID that you first connect your phone to. I also assume there is an degree of lag between what the sensor sees and what the phone displays. I also assume that when you take a picture, it saves it to an internal memory card from which you can then upload it to the phone by wifi. You'll probably need to swap the phone's wireless connection back to your wifi router, or at least disconnect from the Air to use the phones cell data if you then want to send or publish that photo directly. Its' cumbersome.

    Now, imagine taking that photo on a 35mm DSLR with leading edge PDAF technology and an Optical VF. The image data is passed directly to the internal storage of a docked mobile device via a high speed databus, almost instantly. You then undock your mobile device and edit the image directly on it's large high res screen. You then hit send, no need to swap wireless connections at all. Fast, simple and efficient.

    There's no reason why you couldn't have a 17 inch tablet with multiple cores and gigabytes of RAM acting as the camera's screen and processor.
    So, whilst the Air is the concept, the reality could by far surpass it's limitations.