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Pany 25mm on small body?

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by thomastaesu, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. thomastaesu

    thomastaesu Mu-43 Regular

    169
    Nov 16, 2012
    ATL, GA
    Thomas
    Hi, I am switching from Canon Rebel DSLR to m4/3. And, size has everything to do with it. So, I will probably go with Olympus PL5.

    Here is my deal. I'd like to take Kendo pics. (Indoors, not great light, need high shutter speed faster than 1/500) So, I'm considering Pany 20mm or 25mm. How's 25mm lens on small body? Is it unbalanced like 70-200 on rebel body? Could someone plz give me some insight?

    Thanks.

    Thomas
     
  2. demiro

    demiro Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Nov 7, 2010
    I used the 25mm on an E-PM1, which is not too much different in size than the E-PL5. I didn't like it because it didn't balance well in my hand. But I must say lots of folks here seem to have no such complaints about that pairing. I switched to the 20; which is perfectly matched imo.

    I have to say though, that I don't think the E-PL5 is a great choice if Kendo is one of your priorities. Not sure what lenses you have with your Canon, but something like the 85/1.8 would work very well indoors in marginal light capturing fast action.
     
  3. thomastaesu

    thomastaesu Mu-43 Regular

    169
    Nov 16, 2012
    ATL, GA
    Thomas
    Well, I tried 50mm f1.8 on T2i, but had hard time getting faster than 1/500 sec with max iso of 1600 with burst speed of 3fps. And, I think it was a little too tight. So, I was considering getting Sigma 30mm 1.4.

    Wouldn't PL5 high ISO be better at 3200 than T2i's at 1600? According to DPR's studio shots, OM-D's 6400 file looked better than T2i's 1600. That's 2 stops of shutter speed right there. Even though shooting moving targets in kendo, the body movement is not that drastic, so with fast autofocus, I should be able to get a decent shots, no?
     
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  4. WasOM3user

    WasOM3user Mu-43 Veteran

    458
    Oct 20, 2012
    Lancashire, UK
    Paul
    How about the 45mm F1.8 as an option? - lower cost than 25mm F1.4 and a better match to the body - I always found that for indoor sports (Badminton, Hockey etc.) a standard lens never got me close enough and I switched to a longer length or zoom (OM3 + 90mm usually). Assuming the sensor is the same as the OMD then pushing the ISO to 6400 or higher (unless you are printing bigger than 10"*8") and, especially if printing in black and white, quite often can add to the impact of the shot.

    I have not tried it yet on my OMD yet (still waiting for Olympus to send the lens to me) but used 90mm on FF a lot.
     
  5. I actually felt that the E-PM1 handled better with a lens like the PL25 because it gives something for your left hand to hold on to when using a two-handed grip.

    Oh, and I don't think that the difference between the Canon and the Olympus sensor is anywhere near as large as two stops.
     
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  6. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    The E-PL5 and 25/1.4 is a nice combo, but I've not seen anything like the difference in ISO performance you're talking about with the T2i. Going by DPR's samples and DXO's graphs, they are in fact be broadly comparable, shooting RAW. The JPEGs do look somewhat better from the E-M5, but the RAW look better than either JPEGs...

    The E-PL5 does have stabilization, but for your purposes, it won't be much use.

    As to the original question, so long as you're comfortable supporting the weight of the kit with your left hand (which is the standard way of doing it with long lenses to begin with), I don't think you'll find the lens size an issue.
     
  7. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    As best as I can find, Sigma only makes a 30mm f/2.8 with the MFT mount. The 30mm 1.4 aperture is automatic making the lens useless on MFT.

     
  8. thomastaesu

    thomastaesu Mu-43 Regular

    169
    Nov 16, 2012
    ATL, GA
    Thomas
    No, I meant sigma 30mm f1.4 for my T2i. Sorry for the confusion.
     
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  9. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    I think if you're most interested in shooting action, the OMD with the built in EVF and the optional grip providing better support/balance and battery life would be the way to go. Granted, it is more expensive, but, even though the OM-D and E-PL5 share the same sensor, it is a better camera especially for action. If I was shooting Kendo, my first lens choice would probably be the O75mm due to the isolation properties of the longer lens (unless you are mandated to shoot full body images).

    Gary
     
  10. thomastaesu

    thomastaesu Mu-43 Regular

    169
    Nov 16, 2012
    ATL, GA
    Thomas
    I know it probably was discussed a hundred times before, but I'm new to this system. How's AF speed of Pany 20, 25, and oly 45?? Is there a lens with distinct advantage?

    Thanks
     
  11. Jonathan F/2

    Jonathan F/2 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 10, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    I'd rate the 20 the slowest. The 25 is probably the fastest and the 45 is probably right behind, and it's fairly quick.

    The 25 is a fat lens for M43, it tends to fit better on the SLR-style M43 bodies. But I have to say, it's a great lens. Great colors and contrast.

    Here's a pic of the 25 on my old E-PM1:
     
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  12. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    I love my Pany and Oly bodies and lenses, but when it comes to shooting action in low light, I do not even think twice about grabbing my Nikon D300. It depends how you shoot, but I find that my Nikon is quite a bit faster and better at tracking moving subjects than my m4/3rd's bodies. I once tried to photograph a lion dance with my G3 and 25mm lens, and I thought the camera had chocked on the images!

    Good luck,

    --Ken
     
  13. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    I find the m4/3s body/lenses to be very well balanced. I often use the longer Oly 40-150 on my E-PM1 and like the combination. Granted, I am film schooled and use two hands when shooting. And, the OMD handles that long lens better.
     
  14. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    The 25mm and the 45mm are quicker AF than the 20mm. Just be aware that µ4/3 does not do all that well with action.

    The SAF (Single Auto Focus) is very fast, as fast if not faster than a dSLR. But the CAF (Continuous Auto Focus) just doesn't work. And even if it did work, the EVF refresh rate doesn't refresh quickly enough to keep up with the FPS, so you're framing nearly blind.

    For best results, you have to shoot in SAF mode with continuous pumping of the focus button.

    Granted, Kendo is much more confined than soccer or baseball, et cetera. So framing will be much easier than on a large playing field. Just be aware of the limitations.

    Remember-
    1) µ4/3 is fully capable of taking action shots, but generally, a dSLR would be better.
    2) For action, the OM-D is a faster handling camera than the EPL5. The OM-D will deliver consistently more keepers than the EPL5.
    3) The EPL5 w/EVF will increase the handling speed of the EPL5. (But also the cost.)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. dav1dz

    dav1dz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    926
    Nov 6, 2012
    Canada
    Kendo is a really fast sport. I tried it a bit in my youth but boy is it a work out. I was young and stupid and decided not to pursue it.

    Knowing it's fast is an advantage. Anticipation should yield some usable shots. But it's a bit of work and it won't be consistent. A DSLR will be easier with continuous phase detection auto focus.
     
  16. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    Well stated. The problem that I find is that in low light, you are generally shooting at wide apertures and less than ideal shutter speeds. Given the fast nature of the sport, the keeper rate becomes awfully low since your subjects move out of the DOF almost as fast as you can pump that focus button.

    --Ken
     
    • Like Like x 1