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Panorama Shots with GH2

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by shg, Jun 12, 2013.

  1. shg

    shg New to Mu-43

    1
    Jun 12, 2013
    Hello,

    Thanks in advance for any help. I am picking up a job that requires me to shoot panorama shots of an apartment complex. I am required to use a 12mm lens or wider- the 12mm being after crop-factor is factored in. To do the shot, I need to use a Nodal Ninja to create a perfect line-up for the 4 shots that will be stitched together to make the Pano shot.

    My question is, has anyone done this with a GH2? So far I don't know how to get a quality 12 mm lens system for the camera, and am not sure the Ninja works with GH2. The company I might work with suggested getting a T31, as that has a lower drop factor and I could get an 8mm lens- but I'd rather just use my GH2. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Sorry. Didn't see this tucked away in the camera threads. Probably too late to be of any assistance, but...

    I use a Panasonic G3 to take 360x180 VR panos, and it kind of (weirdly) sounds like that's what they're asking you to do. I use the G3 and a Rokinon (Samyang) 7.5mm UMC fisheye lens, with a Nodal Ninja 3, and a cheapass Velbon tripod. It all works pretty well.

    Not sure what you mean by "lower drop factor"? But there's really not much difference between using a dSLR and a m4/3 camera here. The main difficulties are in aligning the gear to rotate your camera/lens around the lens's no-parallax point, having good shooting technique, and then having the appropriate software and knowledge to stitch the sucker. I would never advocate going into this process for a paid job without having done at least a few dozen of them. It took me roughly two years to really get the hang of what I was doing, and I'm still screwing up on occasion. This is not a simple one-step process or particularly easy to master.
     
  3. rnagoda

    rnagoda Mu-43 Veteran

    260
    Jun 12, 2012
    Tucson, AZ
    Robert
    "Lower drop factor" must be typo for "lower crop factor" and the point is pretty salient - with a m4/3 camera getting 12mm "equivalent" would require a 6mm lens which doesn't exist (there may be an adaptable lens out there somewhere, but I've never heard of it). Best you can really do on m4/3 is 14mm equivalent with the Panny 7-14mm zoom.

    The T3i suggestion makes slightly more sense ... but technically speaking an 8mm lens on the T3i is a 12.8mm equivalent, not 12mm. If they are willing to forgive that maybe they are willing to forgive the 14mm you'd get with a Panny setup? Being honest, askingfor 12mm or wider is well and fully on the ridiculous side and maybe they have made a typo of their own here?

    As for the Nodal Ninja, it just holds the camera by it's tripod mount, right? There doesn't seem to be any reason that wouldn't work with your GH2 just as well as it would with a larger body like the T3i.
     
  4. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Ah. My thanks. I really must be slow this morning.

    Ok, going back over what the OP posted, I actually think he meant they were requiring a 24mm or wider lens. (Given that "12mm being after crop-factor is factored in").

    So, actually 12mm or wider, not 6mm, which certainly gives you more than one choice in mft native lenses, although most of them are not low-cost. However, a fisheye is probably the best deal for 360x180 panos (assuming that's what we're talking about) because the largest FoV means the fewest images to stitch together.

    With the 7.5mm, I ideally like to take 6 around, and zenith/nadir shots to cover the entire sphere. You can get away with only four shots around and a zenith, if you tilt downwards for the four-around, and there's no need for larger overlap to remove ghosts/clones. With, say, the 12/2, you'd only have 57 degrees FoV across the vertical edge of the frame (camera's in portrait on a NN), so, to cover 360 around, you'd need, 360/57 => 7 shots around, and with only 71 degrees FoV across the long edge of the frame, three rows. Maybe zenith/nadir shots as well, so roughly 23 shots to cover the sphere.

    Yes, but... some things are a tighter fit on the NN with an mft camera, given that both the horizontal and vertical arms are adjustable, and the knobs for making the adjustments do require space, and you still have to swing everything around. The NN is expecting dSLR gear for the most part, and the fact that mft bodies and lenses are so much thinner--I am jamming up against the nearer end of the horizontal arm. It does work, though, and I don't think the OP should have an issue.

    But, just as a dRebel/entry-level Nikon and a Samyang 8mm is likely to be the preferred beginner's tool set for this on the dSLR side of the fence, I've also seen a ton of panoshooters on the panoguide boards using the Samyang 7.5 on mft, and shaved* on NEX to do the same thing.

    *shaved: integrated hood petals ground off or removed (luckily, in the case of the Samyang 7.5 they're removable without having to use a dremel tool close to the glass of the front element. :) It all started when the first APS-C ultrawide crop lenses started appearing, and the full frame shooters realized they could get far less vignetting and super-wide angles/coverage if they used crop lenses on full-frame bodies (in the case of Canon, 3rd parties don't have the EF-S "bumper" that prevents them being mounted on full frames) if integrated hood petals were removed. The Nikkor 10.5mm was a big candidate for this. The logic carried forwards when the mft Samyang arrived, and NEX shooters found they could get 180-degree coverage across the frame with a shaved one on NEX with a mft->NEX adapter ring. Which is why you'll find 360x180 panos shooters on NEX using the mft 7.5/3.5 version, not the 8/2.8 NEX version of the lens. :) 180-degree coverage means you can probably get the entire sphere with four handheld shots.
     
  5. rnagoda

    rnagoda Mu-43 Veteran

    260
    Jun 12, 2012
    Tucson, AZ
    Robert
    I hope you're right ... 12mm equivalent would be pretty ridiculous!

    Good information here - hope the OP is still watching!
     
  6. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Well, even if the OP isn't, someone may google for this a year from now and it could still be helpful. :) I generally don't worry too much.

    For anybody who's interested in 360x180 pano shooting with the Samyang 7.5mm on mft, btw, the NPP is pretty precisely described in this panoguide board thread.

    The panoguide.com forums are one of the best resources around for how to do this stuff, and what gear/techniques are out there. A really good starting place to get an overview of the process overall is Eric Rougier's fromparis website. The technical section of the website gives a lot of great detailed information, including how to do this with an iPhone. :) And the Flickr community I like for this stuff is Equirectangular.
     
  7. littlefish

    littlefish Mu-43 Regular

    92
    Aug 22, 2011
    Glos., UK
    Not a year later but still very helpful to me as the Samyang 7.5 mm is on my Christmas list.
    :biggrin:

    I hadn't visited Eric Rougier's site in a long while. The handheld panorama is particularly appealing especially as I sold my old Nodal Ninja year before last. I know I have a plumbline in the toolbox somewhere....
     
  8. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    :biggrin:

    I suggest a Y-string.

    I keep meaning to experiment with "baseball" coverage to see if the Samyang can cover the sphere with four shots that way, but I'd still say four around tilted down and a zenith is probably the least you can get away with. But if you're used to the Sigma 8 on an APS-C or full-frame, I gotta say, the Samyang is hecka harder to use handheld.
     
  9. littlefish

    littlefish Mu-43 Regular

    92
    Aug 22, 2011
    Glos., UK
    Thanks for the link. I'll give it a go. :smile: