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Panny 7-14: What Do You Shoot With It?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by newbert, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    I'm renting a Panasonic 7-14 for m43 for a few days, and I'm not as happy with it as I expected to be. I can't really put my finger on it, but I'm struggling to pick out compelling subjects and getting a good composition with it.

    I shoot lots of landscapes and scenics, and I'm concentrating on including something of interest in the foreground. However, I'm finding that structures like barns and old buildings get pretty distorted, and my main subject (ie - scenery in the background) tends to disappear (get flattened/shrunken). I'm also finding that I miss being able to use a polarizer with the lens.

    Just today, I took a drive thru Vermont and found myself switching to my kit 12-50 lens (with polarizer) a lot, instead of using the 7-14.

    So what do you shoot with the Panny 7-14, and do you have any tips/advice for me before I have to send it back in a few days?

    Thanks!
     
  2. DHart

    DHart Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 7, 2010
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Don
    Your experience is par for the course with those who first use an UWA lens. You have to learn new skills in "seeing" with that perspective. It takes more skill to use an UWA, successfully, than it does lenses in the normal and tele ranges. Once those skills and experiences have been developed and you apply them well... you will find the lens returns fantastic results.

    Look at how others have used the lens in ways that appeal to you... and take your beginning cues from that. I shoot all manner of big and small things with the lens.
     
  3. pointbob

    pointbob Mu-43 Regular

    58
    Aug 2, 2012
    you should SERIOUSLY consider the olympus 9-18mm ~ half the price of the panny; seriously sharp and TINY.

    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. DHart

    DHart Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 7, 2010
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Don
    The 9-18 is a great lens as well and, perhaps, a little easier for the beginning UWA shooter to work with since 7mm is quite noticeably wider than 9mm.

    That said, when I shoot my 7-14, it's almost always glued down to being a 7mm prime. :rofl:

    I shoot with both and enjoy their differences in different circumstances. But if I could only have one... it would be the 7-14.

    Check the image threads from these two lenses for a LOT of great examples.
     
  5. MrDoug

    MrDoug Mu-43 Top Veteran

    985
    Sep 5, 2011
    Boise, Idaho
    Yes.. I agree with Don.. it takes sometime to learn (myself included)... but once you do.. you will love it.. don't give up.. I love mine and would of never have thought I would buy or use a UWA lens..
     
  6. Composition becomes very important with UWA lenses because you can fit so much in the shot it's almost all in focus. You will also notice a huge difference if you aren't shooting something dead square. Even the slightest angle will create perspective distortion, although this same effect can be used in your favour as well. They are unforgiving of crooked horizons, too. One of my favourite elements in using an UWA lens is combining foreground and background objects to create a distorted sense of scale between the two. Combining foregound and background is also important in using a UWA lens for landscapes to give depth to the image, and without this the images can come out looking very flat.
     
  7. byron2112

    byron2112 Mu-43 Regular

    82
    May 22, 2011
    gorgeous shot bob
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Bokeaji

    Bokeaji Gonzo's Dad O.*

    Aug 6, 2011
    Austin, TX
    oooooh try some street work!
    i bet it could be pretty interesting!
     
  9. michaeln

    michaeln Guest

    I have had my 7-14 for a month or so and still can't find much I want to use it for. Out of the lenses I have (7-14, 20, 14-45, and 45-200), the 20 and 14-45 get used the most, followed by the 45-200, and very very occasionally I find a use for the 7-14. I'm disappointed, because for what it costs I was hoping I would find it more useful.
     
  10. blue

    blue Mu-43 Veteran

    280
    Jun 1, 2010
    UK
    Not landscapes

    I use the 7mm end mostly for buildings and architecture, exteriors and interior, cars, boats, street stuff, art - sculptures and similar, and a bit of quirky stuff (using the odd perspective).

    It actually makes a nice walk-around lens in a city.

    But to make UWA to work for landscape requires a paticular type of scenery I think, foreground interest plus some grand sweeping background. Remember at 7mm it is seeing more than the eye can and something like ordinary rolling hills usually don't "click" at that focal length.
     
  11. It's difficult to suggest to anyone exactly what they might want to shoot with an ultra-wide lens. I could add a bunch of example images but I don't know how relevant that is going to be to someone else. It would be worthwhile just putting the lens on the camera and leaving it there for a while. With some familiarity it should start to become more natural.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    Nice Image!

    Yes - the Olympus 9-18 was the other UWA I was considering. However, does it really offer that much more than the kit 12-50 that I already own? (I really don't know, so I'm asking.) Yes it's 3mm wider on the wide end. But the aperture (I think) is the same as the kit lens, and it uses the same filters. So, is 3mm wider worth $700? Or is there something else that's better that I'm missing (ie - overall IQ)? :confused:

    Thanks!
     
  13. Kiwi Paul

    Kiwi Paul Mu-43 Top Veteran

    729
    Aug 15, 2011
    Aberdeen Scotland
    The 9-18 is a great lens but once you try the 7-14 you never go back, not because of IQ or size etc just that extra 2mm plays with you and if your going UWA then may as well go all the way!!!
    I love uwa, it's fun but does take a bit of learning and experimentation, even then it's often all in the eye of the beholder.

    Paul

    P1040220.

    P1040207.
     
  14. Kiwi Paul

    Kiwi Paul Mu-43 Top Veteran

    729
    Aug 15, 2011
    Aberdeen Scotland
    My POV is if you already have a lens that goes down to 12mm then forget the 9-18 and get the 7-14, if you have a lens that goes down to 14mm then either 9-018 or 7-14 will do, if you can afford it though I'd say go for the 7-14 not because it's a better lens IQ wise just the extra 2mm is worth it.

    Paul
     
  15. Reactions

    Reactions Mu-43 Regular

    78
    Jul 24, 2012
    Norcal
    Gabe
    Op where did u rent the lens and what does it cost? Thanks
     
  16. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    I rented it from LensRentals. Cost will depend on how long you want it and whether you want to include their breakage insurance.
     
  17. michaeln

    michaeln Guest

    I find I am really bothered by UWA shots where there are vertical objects like buildings or trees and the photographer tilted the lens either up or down. Having all those verticals leaning so much bothers me so much I find it difficult to enjoy the photograph.
     
  18. tanMu4358

    tanMu4358 Mu-43 Regular

    39
    Jul 26, 2012
    I have not owned the 7-14 yet but I can imagine most amateur and pro photographer (landscapes and scenic) like a lot this lens since I owned a Nikon 14-24 G before and was shooting mostly at 14. BTW, this lens is a good candidate for group of people pictures.
     
  19. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    2 comments:

    1) that can be fixed in Lightroom, and sometimes you have to point the camera up or down in order to capture what you want. Unfortunately fixing the convergence will lose you image "width" at the closer end of the shot.

    2) sometimes that convergence is what the shot is all about and correcting it is a mistake.

    My feeling is that too little convergence as a result of camera tilt looks like a mistake and can never look right. A lot of convergence can look deliberate and, if the composition is right, can make the image. Like a lot of things doing it isn't necessarily a mistake, but not doing it well is definitely a mistake. If you're going to have verticals converge in an image, my feeling is don't be half-hearted about it, make it a feature instead of a bug and make it a strong feature. Be dramatic about it.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  20. Kiwi Paul

    Kiwi Paul Mu-43 Top Veteran

    729
    Aug 15, 2011
    Aberdeen Scotland
    I agree, a good "abstract" image can be created by intentional use of perspective exaggeration but it has to be intentional and done correctly.
    My shot of the gears a few posts up is an example although I didn't quite get the composition right, I needed to tilt down a bit eliminating the bridge and wall.

    Paul