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Panasonic Official Dual I.S.Testing Video vs 5 Axis and Sony

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by Robstar1963, Nov 22, 2015.

  1. Robstar1963

    Robstar1963 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    895
    Jun 10, 2011
    Isle of Wight England UK
    Robert (Rob)
    Hi
    Just found this page which includes a Video by Panasonic showing their Testing Rigs and Procedures to Compare Their GX8 Dual I.S. To Competing Image Stabilisation Systems
    First off is a "Full Frame Camera" with 5 Axis I.S. - any guesses which camera that is (Sony)
    Then next up is a Competing Micro Four Thirds 5 Axis System - (Olympus EM5 Mk2)
    Panasonic Claim that the results from their Dual I.S. Is superior to both and show images captured on the LCD Screens of the relevant cameras to show camera shake and how much it is is reduced on each camera
    Personally I think that the test is too simple to produce representative results as would be experienced in a variety of situations with various modes of camera movement
    PANASONIC LUMIX DUAL IS TECHNOLOGY - FOR LUMIX GX8 - Lumix Lounge
    Regards
    Rob
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2015
  2. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    I never trust a company who proves that their tech is superior to the competition's. If it truly is, then independent tests will verify that, and those I will believe. I have a hard time believing that it is better than the 5-axis in the E-M5 II, and even it it is, the E-M1 II will likely be superior when it is released.
     
  3. Robstar1963

    Robstar1963 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    895
    Jun 10, 2011
    Isle of Wight England UK
    Robert (Rob)
    The Speaker finishes off with "...in Micro Four Thirds - Panasonic's Dual I.S. System is clearly the best system available for photographers"
    The rig used by Panasonic appears to subject the cameras only to or at least mainly to movement in forward and backwards pitch - it does not seem to subject them to Yaw, Roll, or the other two axis ( side to side and rise and fall ?) which the Olympus system works against (unless these are in fact built in to the test and less obvious from the very simple video excerpt)
    Also they fail to mention of course that the Dual I.S. Only works with compatible Panasonic lenses and not on any lens that is attached to the Camera a la Olympus 5 Axis
    Rob
     
  4. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    No matter how effective the dual IS is there is a very limited number of Panasonic lenses that currently support it. There was an initial release of updated lens firmware for a few lenses, but no other updates.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    I've been following a similar discussion on another site where similar comments were made. If you are comparing two devices, the testing scenario you use has to be identical for both devices. Both Panasonic and Olympus have used a "shaker table" at shows, so I think the testing method is certainly meaningful. I'd also agree that perhaps different types of motion might yield different results. However, if you consider that you are using two independent stabilization systems in tandem, I would hope that they out perform any single system. Last week I used the GX8 while vacationing in FL and i took quite a few night shots at relatively long exposures. I did not loose even one.

    Regarding the lens updates, if you reread the info that accompanied the first release, it explained that additional updates were being created. All lens, except the 100-300 & 45-200 would be supported.
     
  6. Robstar1963

    Robstar1963 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    895
    Jun 10, 2011
    Isle of Wight England UK
    Robert (Rob)
    Hi Wasabi Bob
    I realise that many of the Panasonic lenses are to be suitably updated
    The point I was trying to make was that you can mount any suitably adapted lens or Olympus un stabilised lens onto their 5 axis system cameras and it will still have the benefit of the full 5 axis stabilisation system whereas with the Panasonic system any unstabilised lens or adapted lens will only have the benefit the two axis in body stabilisation which obviously will be far less effective and will not provide stabilised EVF images
    I think it is bold of Panasonic to claim that their new system is the best available in the Micro Four Thirds World
    I am not an Olympus Partisan and speak up for both manufacturers when appropriate and am currently personally considering buying a GX8 - I just think that it is currently recognised that the Olympus system is the best available and I don't see that the Panasonic claim is valid
    The cons for me against the GX8 (I have many pros listed too) are the lack of full stabilisation on Olympus lenses and the need to use electronic shutter rather than the 0s efcs on the Olympus which seems to have effectively permitted the continued use of mechanical shutters (without the risk of rolling shutter with moving objects to contend with)
    I am split at the moment between keeping my EM5 Mk2 and moving to the GX8 and found the stabilisation web page during my research into all aspects of the new camera
    I do applaud Panasonic for this latest technological advance and for keeping their system unique to them
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2015
  7. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    From reading a wide variety of disparate articles with very little scientific comparability between them, my pointless internal gut assessment of the mirrorless IBIS situation goes something like this:

    1) E-M5 II
    2) E-M1
    4) E-M10 II / E-M5 / GX8 Dual IS
    5) E-M10 / A7 II series
    6) GX8 IBIS only
    7) GX7
    8) E-PLs, E-PMs, all Olympus cameras with 2-axis

    I think in the real world the GX8 system is probably not quite as good. But it's almost certainly better than nothing. Even if it only consistently and reliably offers you 1-2 stops, that can make a huge difference in the real world. I imagine that in certain circumstances, when using the Dual IS system, it probably does equal the best out there.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Remember that the GX8 has an electronic shutter option, so no shutter shock. For Olympus cameras that do not currently have, or will not receive that as a FW update, it can be a significant factor. FWIW, my LX100 with meh OIS is very close to my E-M5 for low shutter speeds with electronic shutter, and is noticeably worse with mechanical shutter.
     
  9. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    That's an interesting observation, if only because the LX100 has a leaf shutter, which shouldn't have anywhere near the same shock as a conventional focal plane shutter.

    I notice, for instance, that (with some difficulty) I can get acceptably sharp photos at 1/15s handheld with my Koni Omega 6x7 leaf-shuttered rangefinder, whereas at the same shutter speed and field of view my Minolta XD SLR would be a blurry mess thanks to mirror slap and shutter shock and all the rest.
     
  10. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Robstar, your point is noted and I can understand your logic, though I don’t fully agree that the benefits apply to all users. The debates comparing “in body” to “in lens” stabilization have been ongoing. Several years ago I had the opportunity to sit in on a meeting with Popular Photography discussing the future of the emerging mirrorless camera market. The discussion lead to an excellent presentation on image stabilization, comparing the two approaches. Just as Panasonic would again explain sometime later, they showed how the “in lens” approach was superior due to the fact that with a zoom lens the stabilization more linearly tracks as the lens focal length changes.

    At this year’s PhotoPlus show I overheard two people in the Olympus booth talking about their new long telephoto, which will use “in lens” stabilization. They admitted that it is a superior system, especially with longer lens. To your point, if the shooter only has non stabilized lens than the Oly approach might make more sense. However, Panasonic’s new Dual Image Stabilization now allows tandem use of both systems. The tie-breaker now is Panasonic’s 4K Photo and Post Focus firmware updates. These are two very addictive features that really do change photography. In the end the “best” camera is the one you use. Outstanding photos are created by talented photographers, not the most expensive, latest camera.