Panasonic LUMIX G X 12-35mm F2.8 ASPH problem: shakes on tripod even with image stabilization off (f

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by paulwillis, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. paulwillis

    paulwillis New to Mu-43

    5
    Dec 13, 2012
    London, UK
    Paul Willis
    A few users who shoot video have found a bit of a problem with the Panasonic LUMIX G X 12-35mm F2.8 ASPH. It shakes the image on tripod even with image stabilization off.

    The lens is running the latest firmware v1.1

    The test involves mounting your camera with the 12-35 (I've tried with my GH2 and my GH3 so it seems to be independent of the body) securely on a tripod, tilt it down 30 degrees or so (this isn't absolutely necessary but seems to produce the effect more consistently) and film something static. I used a newspaper.

    Then review the film. You may need to blow it up to 200% to see it. I missed it the first time I looked at my footage until I did zoom it up.

    I first found out about this on Vimeo [ame=http://vimeo.com/59358100]Strange Panasonic 12-35mm Shakiness (w/14-140mm comparison), GH3 on tripod, image stabilization is off, manual mode, shown @200% on Vimeo[/ame] and have posted my own video on [ame=http://vimeo.com/59427065]Panasonic LUMIX G X 12-35mm F2.8 ASPH problem: shakes on tripod even with image stabilization off (firmware v1.1) on Vimeo[/ame]

    I wonder if any other 12-35 owners who shoot video can test and comment?
     
  2. paulwillis

    paulwillis New to Mu-43

    5
    Dec 13, 2012
    London, UK
    Paul Willis
    Forgot to mention in case you don't read the Vimeo threads, but I (and others) also ran tests with the 35-100 f2.8 and 14-140 f4-5.8 with OIS off and the image is rock solid. The camera can be a GH2 or GH3 so it is a 12-35 issue.
     
  3. Azon

    Azon Mu-43 Regular

    131
    Jan 6, 2013
    Strange that the lens exists almost a year on the market and nobody realized this before...
     
  4. paulwillis

    paulwillis New to Mu-43

    5
    Dec 13, 2012
    London, UK
    Paul Willis
    Well it only seems to show under certain circumstances and it is very subtle.

    You need to be on a tripod with OIS turned off. It seems more pronounced with the camera tilted down, the effect doesn't always happen with the camera level.

    Then even when you have it you have to look closely to see it. As I mentioned I had to zoom in 200% as I actually missed it the first time I looked.

    If the subject or camera are moving then it is as good as invisible