Panasonic Lens Coating.....

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by Tom Swaman, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. Tom Swaman

    Tom Swaman Mu-43 Veteran

    YES, I realize this thread is about panasonic lenses and not directly about Panasonic cameras. I put this here because I am hoping to avoid commercialism in the answer and have this strictly focus on Panasonic lens coatings. Indulge me please.

    1) What is a nano coating specifically?
    2) Is a nano coating any better than the pre-nano coatings and why?
    3) How much about nano coatings is hype or marketing as opposed to optical performance3 enhancement?
    4) Are nano coatings really new or just a name change to sell lenses, etc.?

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

    Best regards,
    Tom
     
  2. Bokeh Diem

    Bokeh Diem Mu-43 Top Veteran

    655
    Mar 14, 2010
    Toronto
    I might have to ask Mork... hang on.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Lol, nanu-coatings.
     
  4. Tom Swaman

    Tom Swaman Mu-43 Veteran

    Henk,

    Thanks. I assume you are telling me that what Nikon refers to as nano-crystal coatings are identical with Panasonic terminology. I do not think this is obdious as Nikon claims to use this coating only on their top, super expensive lenses. I owned Nikon lenses with this coating and used these. What I do not know is what contribution to the overall lens performance came from the coating. Afterall, Zeiss has had their now famous T* coating since about the 1960s.

    Regards,
    Tom

    P.S. B.D. Mork must be to involved with Mindy to break loose with information.
     
  5. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    Personally I think its hype. Coatings reduce reflections and increases light transmission to the sensor. Even in a many element lens with multiple air to glass surfaces, all we are talking about is maybe a few percent of total transmission through the lens between various types of coatings.
     
  6. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    The transmission difference of uncoated vs poorly coated vs a good multi-coated optic is HUGE.

    When I was buying my last rifle scope, I didn't want to spend a lot of money (it was for a 22 plinker after all). I looked through all kinds of scopes with similar objective sizes and exit pupils, and it was absolutely amazing the difference in brightness.

    I forget the number, but uncoated glass reflects ALOT of the light, and doesn't transmit nearly as much as you would think.

    That said, you hit diminishing returns pretty quick, and I don't know that there would be a huge difference in "nano" coatings vs a good multicoated lens, despite what Canikon would lead you to believe.

    The m43 lenses are all "very good" to exceptional. Even the dogs are better than usual Canikon kit.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    The name may be the same but I think the actual coating has probably evolved... I know Pentax's 'SMC' has changed since the Super Takumar days.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Tom Swaman

    Tom Swaman Mu-43 Veteran

    Thanks all. I do know that a coating is a huge item and it makes a big difference in transmission and in flare response. I just do not know whether nano makes a big difference or a small difference, as its name implies, at a huge upcharge.

    Regards,
    Tom
     
  9. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Tom Swaman

    Tom Swaman Mu-43 Veteran

    Djarum,

    Thanks. It is interesting to me that the internal and not the front element is nano-coated.

    Regards,
    Tom
     
  11. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    Sorta what I was thinking. Actually the most important place to put coatings is at air to glass surfaces. The picture shown would indicate that the coating is on an element that doesn't touch air.
     
  12. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    Any change in the index of refraction would be an optical surface. Glass to glass would use two elements with different indices of refraction and would be an optical surface.

    The nano coat might be soft and so is not applied to the external surface. But it looks like its primary job is to reduce internal reflections which would not be caused by the first surface. Also, it would not have to be applied to every surface (if you wanted to keep costs down), just the ones more likely to cause the ghost image.
     
  13. BarefootPilgrim

    BarefootPilgrim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    517
    Dec 23, 2009
    Westchester, IL
    Bob
    I think the "nano" in the description is marketing-speak that refers to the size of your bank balance after you buy a lens that's been made with the stuff.

    :rolleyes:
     
  14. Tom Swaman

    Tom Swaman Mu-43 Veteran

    Yes, the use of nano-coatings has jumped recipient lens prices a whole lot. In reality, I believe the term nano is used to refer to the physical size of the molecular aggregates that are applied as the coating. I think, but I am not 100 % certain that these nano-coatings are vapor deposited in vacuum as opposed to mechabnically sprayed or painted, etc.

    Best regards,
    Tom
     
  15. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Most all of these coatings are vacuum deposition applied