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Panasonic G5 Flash Exposure & WB

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by CX5, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. CX5

    CX5 Mu-43 Regular

    30
    Jan 23, 2013
    Hi,

    This is my first posting as I am still newbie with photography and Panasonic G5, I hope some on can assist me in regards to flash exposure and WB of G5.

    Flash Exposure.
    First Flash zero compensation is too bright so I took about 100 photos ranging from flash exposure -1ev, -2/3ev, -1/3 ev and zero flash compensation with power X zoom, 14-42.

    The flash exposure looks good on my computer when it is -2/3 most of the time but when the zoom lens angle changes, many times flash over expose the close up subject at the same setting. (still taking a photo from maybe 10 feet away) I think I understand that when you take a flash photo of a subjet on a wide angle, more back ground is in the photo so camera takes whole scene into account. However, when I do close up of a subject, (like lens is now at 35 or 80mm instead of 28mm) flash over exposes up to one stop. Why?? I have a panasonicc fz45 and it does not matter if I use wide angle or little close up, flash exosure on the subject is consistant. (Also, I went to local camera shop, Panasonic G5 with regular 14-42 lens seems to give more consistant flash exposure)
    What kind of setting do you use on Panasonic G5? What I am doing wrong?
    :confused:
    The second part is camera setting, I think +1 contrast, +1 blue and +2 red seems to give more pleasing photos to my eyes but I am not an expert. What settig do you use for daytime as well as night flash, if some one can share so I can experiement more will be appreciated.
    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    CX5 I understand that you shot in JPG, the best method to avoid most of your problems and move to the next level of photographie is to shot in RAW. Using LR or any other RAW processing software will enable you to fix most of this problems.
     
  3. CX5

    CX5 Mu-43 Regular

    30
    Jan 23, 2013
    Thank you

    Thank you but as I am rather not experienced in photography as well as in raw, I would like to ask some one for help in taking flash pictures in jpeg.

    If anyone can assist me in anyway, it would be appreciated.
     
  4. spatulaboy

    spatulaboy I'm not really here

    Jul 13, 2011
    North Carolina
    Vin
    Shoot in manual, with a faster shutterspeed. Try it.
     
  5. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    It will be very hard to assist you, the setting you have used for JPG are very personal and scenario depended.
    For a novice photographer it is even more important to use RAW. Because RAW is flexibility enables you to fix mistakes, a thing that is hard to do using JPG.
    My suggestion, is to put the time and effort you put in tuning the JPG, in leaning how to work with RAW.
    Any JPG tuning will enable you to shoot good picture in one scenario, RAW knowledge will enable you to be flexible with all scenarios.
     
  6. spatulaboy

    spatulaboy I'm not really here

    Jul 13, 2011
    North Carolina
    Vin
    I'm going to respectfully disagree here... His issue is not JPEG or RAW, but proper exposure and flash technique.

    I think RAW is the greatest thing to happen to photography, unfortunately it has also made a lot of photographers sloppy and lazy. Rather than getting it right the first time, a lot of people get into the "I'll fix it later in post" mindset. I know because I'm guilty of it myself.
     
  7. LDBecker

    LDBecker Mu-43 Rookie

    14
    Dec 8, 2012
    I assume you're just using the on-camera flash? If so, it is REALLY LIMITED in what it can do - I basically use it for lighting the faces in a close-up back-lit situation... kind of a fill-flash situation. Sometimes a -1 flash comp is needed to tone it down so it looks less "flashy" is helpful. It really depends on ambient light and distance to the subject. You have to judge that.

    As far as messing with the blue/red color balance - just set the white balance properly. It's hard when you've got a mixed lighting situation, but honestly, that's the main reason I shoot raw, because if the color balance of a shot is wrong in a jpg, it's really tough to get it right without damaging the file. In raw, you can fudge between the flash and daylight or whatever settings to get it to look natural.

    Larry
     
  8. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    I totally agree with you, the best practice in taking photos is to make the correct holy triniti (Exposure, Shutter speed and ISO). But novice during their learning curve are making mistakes, RAW enables them to fix some of this mistakes and while fixing they learning to solve to solve these mistakes.
    The OP had a problem with WB setting, in the case of using RAW this problem becomes don't care. By it nature camera setting for WB when shooting RAW is just a suggestion that can be over rolled easily.
    Therefor the best solution for the OP is to shot RAW+JPG, if he like s the JPG then no meed for the RAW. If he missed the JPG and the picture is important he can fix it in RAW.
     
  9. gsciorio

    gsciorio Mu-43 Top Veteran

    636
    Dec 29, 2011
    Miami, FL
    Going from JPEG to RAW to fix photographic errors in post is the next level in frustration not photography. Learning solid shooting skills is. :thumbup:
     
  10. gsciorio

    gsciorio Mu-43 Top Veteran

    636
    Dec 29, 2011
    Miami, FL
    Can you post some examples? Keep shooting JPEG, don't rely on RAW to save you, it will only complicate things in the future. It's good that you're asking questions about photography. If you can post what you're shooting it would be much easier to help you out.
     
  11. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    RAW will not save him crappy picture is crappy in RAW, JPG or TIFF.
    He tries to create a general WB setting that will be good for all situation.
    This is a waste of time, shooting in RAW will give him the WB solution he is seeking.
    I have started using RAW 1/2 a year ago, at the beginning it saved me from lousy exposures, the process of fixing the RAW taught me allot about my mistakes, now I hardly rely on RAW for fixing exposure mistakes, because I do not make them.
    In your site, which I follow daily, you preach to use JPG, it is OK, but for novice who tend to do more mistakes then a pro like you, RAW can save some precious moments.
     
  12. gsciorio

    gsciorio Mu-43 Top Veteran

    636
    Dec 29, 2011
    Miami, FL
    I agree with you 100%. If at anytime a JPEG shooter is going into a situation that they find difficult shooting RAW + JPEG is an excellent compromise. :smile:
     
  13. CX5

    CX5 Mu-43 Regular

    30
    Jan 23, 2013
    thank you

    Thank you for all the information. I have since played aroud little more with my new G5 and fond out that flash exposure is inconsistant even though I took same scene with same focus point with a eact same mode. I have sent these photos to Nortown Camera for them to review.
    I understand for newbie like me, it is important to shoot jpeg and raw. However, if any one can share their favourite setting (flash and WB) will be appreciated as I can use this as a base to experiement more.
     
  14. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    CX5 I suggest that for WB put the camera in auto. The G5 is doing a very good work in this mode better then it's predecessors. The only weak aspect of the Panasonic camera WB is a yellow tendency in artificial light scenarios, I had it allot with the G2 but did not notice it in G5. This can be fixed in post processing on the RAW.
    The flash compensation setting I use, is depended on the light, I can not generalize a setting.
    I prefer not to use flash and shot in low light situation with the P20 F/1.7 or the OM 50mm F/1.8. The G5 with its great high ISO, low noise level, helps in that respect and I use flash only in very dim scenarios.
    If you shot allot in low light situation, a fast prime lens will be your best investment.
     
  15. BillW

    BillW Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Oct 22, 2012
    Scranton, PA
    Which mode are you shooting in?
    What are yout specific settings?

    Trying to balance ambient and flash white balance is always tricky.
    Even with a custom WB, your ambient light can effect the overall color temp.

    If I'm in a setting with a lot of tungsten light, I will set my WB to tungsten/indoor and use an amber gel over my flash (CTO) so my flash puts out the same color of light and it all balances. Unfiltered flash is basically blue or daylight, which puts it at the exact opposite of normal household indoor light. If you are shooting at a high ISO, or a setting which allows more ambient light in, then your photos will go orange in the background. The only way to correct that is to use a filter on the flash, or an LED light on-camera balanced for tungsten.

    I can assure you that flash and digital is NOT foolproof. Having shot tons of events (mainly weddings), it's commonplace to use flash exposure compensation all day long. I've shot both Nikon and Canon, and now a Panasonic G5 is also being added to my equipment and I find that using flash is similar across the board. I would rather use my mirrorless without flash, and balance for ambient light.

    In the studio, I grab a custom WB and shoot with metered studio strobes and have no issues, but then again, the exposure is high enough, and the ISO low enough that no ambient light registers, and I get pure strobe light.

    In most situations, Auto WB will give you the most variable and inconsistent results in any camera. Some are better than others, but generally speaking, it's a gamble. Picking a preset WB, or setting a custom one manually will get you much closer, but raw or jpg, you will most likely need to do some adjusting after the fact. A preset WB will allow you to correct all your shots at once in post production. Adjusting in the camera can be just as troublesome, IMO, and I would leave the settings at the default to minimize future color errors.
     
  16. spatulaboy

    spatulaboy I'm not really here

    Jul 13, 2011
    North Carolina
    Vin
    Are you using the pop up flash or external flash? Unfortunately the pop up flash is of very limited usefulness. You might want to invest in a better flash unit.

    I attended a party with my G5 and Metz 50 AF-1. As mentioned above, trying to balance ambient light with flash is not a quick and easy task. I had to take a few test shots to dial it in. Also the light and wall colors change from room to room so I find myself constantly changing my settings. Have you tried to set your WB to the built in FLASH setting? It seems to work well.

    These are taken with the PL 25mm f1.4. ISO200 I think I had the flash compensation set at -1/3 EV. I shot in RAW and processed in LR, but I am confident I can get similar results in JPEG.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/vftsai/8420638984/" title="P1020515-1 by Vincent-F-Tsai, on Flickr"> 8420638984_4702bc4161_c. "800" height="534" alt="P1020515-1"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/vftsai/8420639278/" title="P1020567-2 by Vincent-F-Tsai, on Flickr"> 8420639278_72a7e5b289_c. "800" height="534" alt="P1020567-2"></a>
     
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  17. rdo

    rdo Mu-43 Rookie

    15
    Aug 26, 2012
    Hello,

    I don't have experience with the G5, so your problem can be purely related to G5, but you can search the net for this video course "OneLight Photography Workshop". It is near 4 hours!! explanations and examples only about the proper use of the flash. You definitely must see the first 1 hour - there he says some very important laws of flash photography:
    1 - the shutter controls the ambient light (the background) -> slow shutter more background
    2 - the aperture controls the flash light -> big aperture - more flash light
    3 - with 2xdistance the light from flash diminish with 1/4 -> this will help you understand what will be in flash range and how it will change

    I also advice you to return your factory settings for WB, contrast, color... and to do some experimenting in Manual mode. This will help you build understanding how your camera will react in different aperture/shutter/iso settings. I'm not sure if G5 has settings for the flash power - if it has - then you must experiment with it too.
     
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