Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 + Olympus 45mm f/1.8

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by krijtin, May 1, 2012.

  1. krijtin

    krijtin Mu-43 Rookie

    Jan 3, 2012
    To those who own BOTH lenses, based on your shooting experience, in what ways do both of these lenses work well together?

    I have the 20mm and now contemplating on buying the 45mm. I'm currently into still life photography and some street and is interested in doing some portrait as well.

    I'm afraid that if I get the 45mm, there will be some kind of an overlap between the two lenses and that the purchase will be hard to justify.

    I'm also considering the Samyang/Rokinon 7.5mm fisheye lens, which I also think is fun to work with. Sadly, I could only afford to buy just one lens.

    My other lens btw is the 14-42mm which has been screaming for a new owner ever since I got the 20mm.
  2. mzd

    mzd Mu-43 Veteran

    Nov 30, 2010
    well, i have both, though the 45 is quite new to me yet. however, i really don't think there is much overlap between the two. there currently are no large aperture m43 zooms, and even the upcoming panasonic X 2.8 zooms will be two stops slower. there is a very large distance between your 20mm (40 equiv) and the 45mm (90 equiv). the 20mm is a fantastic overall lens and a nice focal length; great for indoors shooting and of course low-light, but also good for landscape and street. but the 20mm will distort portraits if you try to frame a head & shoulders shot. the 45mm is perfect for a head & shoulders portrait, but is also very good for getting you closer to your subject (and more subject isolation as a result) at say, concerts or other performances where you are not free to walk right up to your subject.
    the focal length difference is large enough that i would say there is really no overlap, but rather a perfect compliment to one another.
    • Like Like x 1
  3. ill_dawg

    ill_dawg Mu-43 Veteran

    Aug 26, 2010
    I have all 3 of the lenses you mentioned, the 7.5, the 20, and the 45, and I would echo what mzd said. I like the 20 for indoors and group shots and the 45 for outdoors and individual shots. The 7.5 is great for adding lots of context and, surprisingly, doing semi-macro shots (its close focus distance is a couple mm from the front of the lens). Finances permitting, there's no reason not to own all 3 as they are all good for different situations.
    • Like Like x 2
  4. krijtin

    krijtin Mu-43 Rookie

    Jan 3, 2012
    Thanks for the response!

    I didn't know that the 20mm distorts portrait shots! My portrait shots look acceptable to me. Or maybe I'm not just very techie when it comes to this.

    The 45mm looks very enticing, based on sample photos taken using it. Same goes with the Samyang/Rokinon fisheye. Only if I could get both without digging a hole in my pocket.
  5. capodave

    capodave Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Jul 4, 2010
    Southern Cal
    Real Name:
    The 45 is a great lens, but I shoot mostly with my 20 and 12.
    Often the 45 is too long.
    I guess I prefer wide primes.
    The 20 is more like a normal fov.
    I wouldn't part with the 45 tho.
  6. billgreen

    billgreen Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Apr 4, 2012
    Herradura de Rivas, Costa Rica
    Real Name:
    Bill Green
    I have both and do not feel they in any way overlap. They are both superb. I also have the Panny 14 2.5. And even though I feel that in some ways the 14 and 20 are too close I could never part with either. The 14mm on my GX-1 makes a nice compact package and the $ value (what I could get if I sold it) doesn't equal it's usefulness value at all. As for the 45 1.8, I recommend it highly. You won't be sorry.
  7. chrism_scotland

    chrism_scotland Mu-43 Veteran

    Jun 1, 2011
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Likely to pickup a 45mm this weekend as I've been looking at one for a while and seems a cracker.

    But conflicted on either a 20mm or 25mm but a 20 and 45 seems like it maybe a better mix
  8. blue

    blue Mu-43 Veteran

    Jun 1, 2010
    I didn't know that the 20mm distorts portrait shots!

    It doesn't, as such. I think what is meant that if you get close up to a face with the 20mm then the perspective looks "wrong", and it's not flattering for portraits.

    More explanation and pictures here

    Micro 4/3rds Photography: Using the Lumix 20mm as portrait lens
  9. duke

    duke Mu-43 Veteran

    Dec 4, 2010
    Tulsa, moving to Houston
    Real Name:
    It all depends on how and what you shoot. For some having the 14&45 is a perfect two lens kit ;) Others have the 12,14,20,PL25, PL45 and 45f1.8 and don't feel there is too much overlap for how they shoot.