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P vs a mode question

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by Adobres, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. Adobres

    Adobres Mu-43 Regular

    90
    Nov 25, 2011
    hi there. is there a difference in how the camera acts when using aperture mode verses program mode and using the program shift to change the aperture?
    thanks!
    adam
     
  2. MajorMagee

    MajorMagee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 24, 2011
    Dayton, OH
    The camera acts the same. There are always four things working together in your camera. The light meter, shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. For any given set of circumstances there are several combinations that will give the particular exposure that the camera calculates as optimal (defined in the firmware) unless you tell it otherwise. That combination is controlled by what mode you're in as the time.

    What changes as you change modes or manually direct it to the different possible combinations are all the other characteristics of the shot besides exposure (DOF, Motion Blur, Grain, Dynamic Range, etc.).
     
  3. flaxseedoil1000

    flaxseedoil1000 Mu-43 Regular

    102
    Mar 10, 2011

    Yes, at least on my GH2 there is.

    Example: It's a sunny day and you have your Oly 45mm f/1.8 lens on.

    Aperture mode - you set to 1.8, the shutter goes all the way to the 4,000 limit, and it's still over exposed.

    P mode - it knows 4,000 is not fast enough and won't let you set the aperture to 1.8. Instead it limits how wide the aperture can be set without over exposing. So while you may want 1.8 it says no and only lets you go to 2.5 or whatever will prevent over exposure.

    P mode keep you out of trouble :)
     
  4. RDM

    RDM Mu-43 All-Pro

    I agree, also adding that it will help to teach you nothing about photography and Obviously give you no control of your camera settings but more importantly not let you learn how to control it.

    If you have to take photos fast and don't have time to adjust your camera, like for sporting events or a child's recital P and A are fine settings to use. However if you want to learn ho to control your exposures more and utalize your camera i say Use Use it in Manual, maybe A, or S at first as training wheels and look at your light meter to help you.
    Go ahead and MAKE MISTAKES, mess up shots, don't worry about it. You learn more that way.
     
  5. meyerweb

    meyerweb Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 5, 2011
    That is totally wrong.

    On the typical modern ILC, you have just as much control in 'P' as in A, S, and M. You just exercise that control in a [very] slightly different way. I'll use Panasonic cameras as an example, since I'm not that familiar with Oly

    In M mode, you turn the rear dial to set aperture, then click the rear dial and turn it to set the shutter speed. You have to watch the meter display and/or the histogram to judge exposure.

    In A mode, you turn the rear dial to adjust aperture, then click the rear dial and turn it to set exposure compensation (EC), which works by changing the shutter speed. You have to watch the meter display and/or the histogram to judge exposure. Pretty much the same workflow.

    In S mode, you turn the rear dial to adjust shutter speed, then click the rear dial and turn it to set exposure compensation (EC), which works by changing the aperture. You have to watch the meter display and/or the histogram to judge exposure. Pretty much the same workflow.

    In P mode, you click and turn the rear dial to engage EC, and watch the meter display and/or the histogram to judge exposure. Then click again and turn the dial to engage program shift and select the speed or aperture you choose. The workflow is different, but you have the same control over shutter speed and aperture and overall exposure.

    Manual forces you to think, where P, and to some extent S and A let you get away with thinking less, but the idea that P mode somehow precludes you from thinking about what you're doing and exercising control is just wrong.

    I frequently leave the camera in P mode when I'm out wandering around. If something comes up quickly I don't have to worry about exposure, and if I have the time I can use program shift to choose the aperture I want. I find the metering on the GH2 accurate enough that I rarely use EC; I'm more likely to use exposure bracketing if the lighting is complex.
     
  6. fredlong

    fredlong Just this guy...

    Apr 18, 2011
    Massachusetts USA
    Fred
    None of the modes will teach you anything about photography unless you want to learn. If you want to learn, you can learn in any mode.

    Edited to add: In every mode you have the same two decisions. First, how much to deviate from the light meter's suggestion. That could be from zero to a lot, the meter doesn't know my intent. And second, which of the several resulting combinations of aperture and shutter speed to use.

    Fred
     
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