Overexposed photos

PeeBee

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Although the pairs of images seem to be centered on approximately the same focus point, if you are using spot metering, any change of focus point can drastically change the exposure reading. I'm not familiar with Pany cameras, but you said you think you are using multi-point metering. If this is a large version of spot-metering, it would be less prone to drastic changes caused by the slight shift of focus point, but still, I think it might be the case of this which nobody has mentioned. The exposure bracketing seems more likely, however.

Multi-point metering on Panasonic is the same as ESP on Olympus. The metering is averaged across the frame.
 

RAH

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Yes, I agree about not using Auto ISO. I always consider Auto ISO to be something you would use when using Shutter priority, to guard against under-exposure if you set your shutter speed too fast. This is EASY to do because of the relatively few f-stops on a lens. I don't see much point in Auto ISO with Aperture priority, or at least not as obvious a point. I mean, if you are worried about too slow shutter speeds, just pay a little attention to the shutter speeds you are getting and adjust the ISO manually. I suppose if you set a limit to the Auto ISO, it's OK, but I never use it. I think it is essential with Shutter priority, however, because you can get under exposure without even realizing.
 

ChuckG

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I just wanted to update everyone who provided suggestions. I shut off the single shot bracketing, not sure how it got turned on, and it seems to have solved the problem. I went out in the yard after work and took a dozen or so shots and didn't see any obvious issues with exposure. Thank you all very much.
 

PeeBee

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Yes, I agree about not using Auto ISO. I always consider Auto ISO to be something you would use when using Shutter priority, to guard against under-exposure if you set your shutter speed too fast. This is EASY to do because of the relatively few f-stops on a lens. I don't see much point in Auto ISO with Aperture priority, or at least not as obvious a point. I mean, if you are worried about too slow shutter speeds, just pay a little attention to the shutter speeds you are getting and adjust the ISO manually. I suppose if you set a limit to the Auto ISO, it's OK, but I never use it. I think it is essential with Shutter priority, however, because you can get under exposure without even realizing.
I find auto ISO is more useful Aperture priority. In shutter priority, I've manually set the shutter speed and it remains constant unless manually changed again. In Aperture Priority, the shutter speed changes automatically in accordance to metering, so unless I'm mindful of shutter speed for each frame, I can get caught out. With Auto ISO, the camera adjusts the iso to maintain an optimal shutter speed based on a pre-programmed value that corresponds to the focal length of the lens. The risk is that the iso can rise and become detrimental to IQ, which is where auto iso capping comes in, as you point out.

I have auto iso enabled most of the time and typically only set manually when conditions mean I need to exceed my auto iso limit.
 

RAH

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I find auto ISO is more useful Aperture priority. In shutter priority, I've manually set the shutter speed and it remains constant unless manually changed again. In Aperture Priority, the shutter speed changes automatically in accordance to metering, so unless I'm mindful of shutter speed for each frame, I can get caught out. With Auto ISO, the camera adjusts the iso to maintain an optimal shutter speed based on a pre-programmed value that corresponds to the focal length of the lens. The risk is that the iso can rise and become detrimental to IQ, which is where auto iso capping comes in, as you point out.

I have auto iso enabled most of the time and typically only set manually when conditions mean I need to exceed my auto iso limit.
I think you've missed my point. Of course, with Aperture Priority you can get a too-slow shutter speed if you don't watch what you are getting.

However, with Aperture Priority, you essentially can NEVER get a bad exposure (no matter what aperture you manually set it at) because the camera has so many shutter speeds available to it (from many seconds to 1/4000 or higher; kind of obvious). Since a well-exposed image is arguably the most important aspect of an image, this is a top priority, IMHO. The only condition where you can run into a bad exposure is on a VERY bright day with a wide-open lens, where your shutter speed needs get too high. This rarely happens.

So, with Aperture Priority you don't need Auto-ISO to protect you from a bad exposure. It CAN be used to protect you against too-slow shutter speeds, as you suggest, and it this is a good use for it in Aperture Priority mode. Myself, I don't do that, because I prefer to know what ISO I am using for the conditions, and don't find it all that difficult to keep track of what shutter speed I am getting, as @John King says.

This is in marked contrast to Shutter Priority where you can very easily require a faster lens than you have mounted if you manually set your shutter speed too high. The lens has relatively few apertures available and you can get burned badly if the max aperture is not enough to prevent under-exposure for the shutter speed you set. One commonly-used protection against this is to set Auto-ISO.

I don't think we have a disagreement here, just a difference in the way we shoot and what our priorities are. Different strokes! :)
 

ChuckG

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This is in interesting discussion. I almost always use auto ISO. There have been situations indoors and out where I set the ISO manually but not often. I would be interested in hearing more opinions on the pros and cons of using auto ISO. What are the potential benefits of manually setting ISO all the time?
 

RAH

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I think it mainly depends on how tolerant you are about noise. But even saying that and saying that I prefer to set my own ISO and know what I am using, I'll have to admit that with modern cameras, for many conditions it doesn't much matter whether the camera uses say 400, 800 or 1600. It's just the ends that matter here, I guess - 200 when you REALLY want a smooth image and can get what you want for everything else, and 3200 when you need a faster shutter speed.
 

PakkyT

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I would be interested in hearing more opinions on the pros and cons of using auto ISO.
I have found with Olympus cameras (not sure how Panasonic models work it) and shooting in Aperture priority that even with Auto ISO, the camera tends to raise the ISO as a last resort. So I set my aperture and then the shutter speed will begin to slow down as needed for lower light situations. It will only be when you reach the shutter speed that the camera has decided is the slowest you can go hand held with the focal length being use that it will then begin to bump up the ISO. The camera sort of follows the 1/focal-length (in 35mm equivalents) rule of thumb for shake free images but has its own rules that you would have to play with your different lenses to find out what that number is for that lens (perhaps the IS is factored in as well?).

Certainly if you are using a tripod or equivalent and there is no lower limit for the shutter speed (no subject movement), I would lock the ISO to its base value for the cleanest image. But in general use in A mode, my E-M1.1 is fairly conservative about when it starts to raise the ISO. Also keep in mind you can usually limit the range in Auto ISO mode and you can set it for something like 200-800 or even 200-400 to give the camera some small working range that is likely not to be much difference practically image quality-wise, but makes the camera stop and warn you about your exposure if the ISO needed is much higher so you can then consciously make the decision to manually set it much higher.
 

oldracer

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I have this problem even outdoors. This past weekend was the first time I had a chance to use the camera extensively indoors. I swapped the lens after work tonight to my P45-150 and went outside before the storm came and shot about 2 dozen shots. A few were over exposed but not as bad and a few were slightly underexposed. After dinner I checked the settings and single shot bracketing was turned on. I will shoot some more in the next couple of days as a test. Hopefully this was the issue. I appreciate all the suggestions and tips. There's still a lot to learn about the camera, features, and settings. So far I really like the camera and the P12-60 kit lens.
Absent some problem with the camera settings for bracketing, etc. I would suspect light metering errors. All of those shots have bright outside light from windows. With that kind of a situation I wouldn't even consider letting some kind of matrix determine my exposure. My cameras are always set to center-weighted metering. My approach to shooting in an environment like you had is to place the metering point on the thing I want to have properly exposed, then hold that meter setting and move as necessary to finish the composition. No way am I going to believe that the camera can figure out anything but the most vanilla lighting situation, most especially not one with huge backlighting.
 

RAH

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Absent some problem with the camera settings for bracketing, etc. I would suspect light metering errors. All of those shots have bright outside light from windows. With that kind of a situation I wouldn't even consider letting some kind of matrix determine my exposure. My cameras are always set to center-weighted metering. My approach to shooting in an environment like you had is to place the metering point on the thing I want to have properly exposed, then hold that meter setting and move as necessary to finish the composition. No way am I going to believe that the camera can figure out anything but the most vanilla lighting situation, most especially not one with huge backlighting.
Maybe you missed his more recent posting, above, which says:
I just wanted to update everyone who provided suggestions. I shut off the single shot bracketing, not sure how it got turned on, and it seems to have solved the problem. I went out in the yard after work and took a dozen or so shots and didn't see any obvious issues with exposure. Thank you all very much.
So I think he has this resolved. :)
 

PeeBee

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I think you've missed my point. Of course, with Aperture Priority you can get a too-slow shutter speed if you don't watch what you are getting.

However, with Aperture Priority, you essentially can NEVER get a bad exposure (no matter what aperture you manually set it at) because the camera has so many shutter speeds available to it (from many seconds to 1/4000 or higher; kind of obvious). Since a well-exposed image is arguably the most important aspect of an image, this is a top priority, IMHO. The only condition where you can run into a bad exposure is on a VERY bright day with a wide-open lens, where your shutter speed needs get too high. This rarely happens.

So, with Aperture Priority you don't need Auto-ISO to protect you from a bad exposure. It CAN be used to protect you against too-slow shutter speeds, as you suggest, and it this is a good use for it in Aperture Priority mode. Myself, I don't do that, because I prefer to know what ISO I am using for the conditions, and don't find it all that difficult to keep track of what shutter speed I am getting, as @John King says.

This is in marked contrast to Shutter Priority where you can very easily require a faster lens than you have mounted if you manually set your shutter speed too high. The lens has relatively few apertures available and you can get burned badly if the max aperture is not enough to prevent under-exposure for the shutter speed you set. One commonly-used protection against this is to set Auto-ISO.

I don't think we have a disagreement here, just a difference in the way we shoot and what our priorities are. Different strokes! :)

It's not uncommon for me to miss the point, but I get what you're saying. I think for me, since I shoot primarily in Aperture Priority, my mind is conditioned to think aperture first. When I switch to Shutter Priority for specific affect, being out of my 'norm' I pay more attention to settings. In this case, the shutter speed is already a known quantity and by nature, I consider the aperture.

And yes, I use auto iso to protect against low shutter speeds. Animals and wildlife are my primary interest. They move quickly and unpredictably, in and out of shade. With a fixed aperture, the shutter speed requirements change in an instant. Auto iso allows me to concentrate on tracking the animal without having to pay much attention to shutter speeds during a sequence. When shooting something static or using a tripod, I'll maybe switch to a manual iso if I feel there's an IQ benefit.

I've only been using auto iso for the last couple of years, but for my needs it's a very useful feature.
 

RAH

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I think for me, since I shoot primarily in Aperture Priority, my mind is conditioned to think aperture first. When I switch to Shutter Priority for specific affect, being out of my 'norm' I pay more attention to settings. In this case, the shutter speed is already a known quantity and by nature, I consider the aperture.
I know what you mean about paying attention to different settings depending on the mode. In fact, in my normal shooting (Aperture mode too), I have noticied that once I set the aperture for a given condition, I pay almost no attention to it and mostly adjust the ISO to give me a good shutter speed.

So, in other words, I am using Aperture Mode but seldom change the Aperture, which sounds kind of odd. Just as an example, if I am shooting wildlife on a bright day, I'd probably pick a sharp aperture (on m43, usually f4 or 5.6) and then just leave it there. If my shutter speed gets too low, I adjust the ISO, trying to not use 3200 if at all possible. Aperture Priority, what Aperture priority?!? ;) It does seem as though Auto-ISO might help with this. I'll give it a try...
 

PakkyT

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I am using Aperture Mode but seldom change the Aperture
That's me with the 12-100 PRO since it doesn't get any faster than f4 and in normal use I don't find many instances where I think stopping down will improve the photo further for what I normally shoot. It is the faster primes that I tend to change the aperture since wide open at f1.8 isn't always ideal but again I may go no slower than f2.8 to f4 but may set the aperture for the outing and like you not adjust it again.

The exception for me usually is if I am out on a sunny day and am trying to use an external flash on something and didn't bring my ND filter with me or don't want to pull it out for one shot. I'll dial the aperture down enough to get the shutter at or below the flash sync speed. But that's more of a special case use.
 

Little Fish

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Looks like you have it set to HDR mode with single shot vs the burst HDR. Turn off the HDR mode or set the HDR to Burst and see if it works out.
 

PeeBee

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If my shutter speed gets too low, I adjust the ISO, trying to not use 3200 if at all possible. Aperture Priority, what Aperture priority?!? ;) It does seem as though Auto-ISO might help with this. I'll give it a try...
A pro wedding and events photographer suggested I use auto ISO to maintain shutter speed in dynamic light conditions a few years ago. I tried it and have been using it since. I had mine capped at 3200, and I've raised it to 6400 since getting PL4 with DeepPRIME.
 

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