Orionid meteor exposure tonight?

RAH

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Too late for yesterday, I guess, but Live Composite is the normal way to do this type of thing, I think. At least in my neck of the woods (New Hampshire), Live Umbrella would be better recently.
 

Shortsonfire79

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Went to look last night. Surprise: can't see the moon with the Bay Area light pollution (I kid, it's not that bad but we saw only a few stars). My sister saw a couple in Oregon.

I was thinking I'd either live composite to get some star trails with a bunch of stacked meteors. Alternatively I'd do a non-live composite and take a time-lapse of 500-rule exposures. I think this outputs individual RAW files but I didn't bother testing it. This would give me pinpoint stars and what I'd hope would be occasional meteors. If I wanted to stack from there I could.
 

WaltP

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Live composite gave me streaks rather than spots. I used 4-8 seconds, iso 800, f/3.5, 12mm.
It seemed to capture, but then after a few cycles (I was running to about 40 seconds), the stars had moved so it captured the new light and made the streak.
Thinking maybe a single 10-20 second exposure?
 

RAH

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Live composite gave me streaks rather than spots. I used 4-8 seconds, iso 800, f/3.5, 12mm.
It seemed to capture, but then after a few cycles (I was running to about 40 seconds), the stars had moved so it captured the new light and made the streak.
Thinking maybe a single 10-20 second exposure?
But I don't think that Live Composite is necessarily good for looking at STARS. For the Orionids, aren't you looking for things that appear and then disappear quickly (i.e. meteors). That should work OK, I should think (although the stars may look streaked in the background, I suppose).
 

Shortsonfire79

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Live composite gave me streaks rather than spots. I used 4-8 seconds, iso 800, f/3.5, 12mm.
It seemed to capture, but then after a few cycles (I was running to about 40 seconds), the stars had moved so it captured the new light and made the streak.
Thinking maybe a single 10-20 second exposure?
Yes that is to be expected. Live composite is good for star trails, apparently not what you were going for last night. This works by taking x number of pictures at your desired (4s, iso 800, f/3.5, 12mm) lens settings. It will constantly update the image based on new light readings the sensor picks up, hence the star "streaks" because of the new light update.

At 12mm, using the "500 rule" you'll want 500/24(mm full frame) a roughly 20.8 second exposure, or 20s to get pinpoint sharp stars. I usually round down.

To combine this with the Orionids, you'd either want a long live composite of a lot of star trails with several oblique meteors cutting through the scene. OR. Pinpoint sharp stars with maybe one oblique meteor cutting through it. This is practically impossible to time hence my suggestion of running a timelapse throughout the night.
 
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