Original OMD EM5 ---buy new glass or body or??

orphanedinode

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Hello to all here. I have been reading the forum extensively and this is my first post. Many thanks to all of you for the expertise and courtesy I see here.

I have an OMD EM5 I bought in 2012 before leaving the US. I currently live in Ecuador. Camera has a little less than 13,000 shutter actuations. My photography is mainly places....landscapes i.e mountains, meadows &c--- and macro. The lenses I have are the kit 12-50 3.5-6.3 and a 40-150 4 -5.6. Here in Ecuador we pay as much as 100% import duty on camera equipment. Being retired and on a limited budget one looks for alternatives.....
Someone here in the community has 3 Nikon lenses he says are comparatively new---an af-s Nikkor 35mm prime 1.8; an af-s dx vr Nikkor 55-200 f 4-5.6 and a Nikkor 16-55 f 3.5-5.6. He is asking $625 for all 3.
I understand that with an adapter I would be able to shoot these lenses on my EM5 body but I am assuming (possibly erroneously) in strictly manual mode i.e no electronic control of focus or aperture.

Given that one is able to buy a new OMD EM1 ii for less than $1000 now and given the Oly glass that I have-- is a better way forward i.e. something that will make a discernible difference in image quality to just shoot the lenses that I have now with an EM1 ii?

I have always heard that anyone shooting should buy glass first and a body second. The glass I have has done yeoman duty but its not pro glass and I am aware of its limitations, I see them in my work. So would an adapter and the Nikon glass be superior to the lens I have image wise on my EM5 considering I am shooting with just CDAF-- the somewhat limited EM5 viewfinder can make manual focusing difficult ( I shoot most of my work in manual because of CDAF and DOF limitations given the lens F stop limitations and what noise higher iso's produce). On the other side of the equation the EM1ii has a newer higher res sensor, improved PDAF auto focus and a host of other improvements over my now almost 10 year old body and lenses...although I will still be limited by the lens part of the equation with my original Oly glass...... I would love to spring for both a new body and some pro glass but it isnt in the cards, at least not in any sane manner any time soon.
Which way forward would make a discernible difference in my image quality? If it is to buy an adapter and the Nikon lenses, which adapter to buy and what would be the limitations shooting these Nikon lenses ? I realize that this may be somewhat of a subjective question given what I have outlined here. Any help or suggestions would be very much appreciated.

Many thanks.
 

Mack

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I have a Nikon adapter and Nikon lenses to use on the m43 Olympus. My issues using it is, as you say, are lack of AF and aperture which can be important since everything is wide open otherwise with a shallow DOF. Then their is that weight addition with using heavier Nikon lenses and the adapter too. I have since sold off all my old Nikon F lenses as they were old (10+years) and soft being they were not their newer and better glass as on the Nikon Z series. Glass tech moved ahead, but the FF glass hasn't shed much weight verses their mirrorless FF bodies. Nikon is starting to come out with smaller and lighter S-mount primes, albeit slower (Shades of Olympus small primes!).

Personally, I'd go for the E-M1 II or a used III and maybe an all around zoom. Maybe a used Olympus 12-100 f/4 Pro which is what is pretty much the standard lens left on my E-M1 II body 24/7. Leave the full-frame and DX stuff to those bodies that work better with it. No sense limiting their use by trying to adapt it and having things not work. At some point you'll be wishing for aperture control or AF - and later spending more cash wondering why you did it to begin with.

My two-cent opinion.
 

orphanedinode

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Hi Mack
Thanks very much. This is exactly the info I was looking for. When I left the US in 2012 I sold my Nikon kit and moved to the EM5. The primary obstacle that I had to learn to shoot around was CDAF. Otherwise its been a great camera and still takes great photos. Understand about the aperture problem. I already have to struggle with DOF when using the kit 12-50 in macro mode and when shooting normally and trying to keep the ISO down to avoid noise. Cant imagine being stuck wide open.
You have solved the quandary for me. I think I am going to look for a bargain on either the EM1 ii body or the EM1 iii used and try to find your recommended 12-100 F4. I also probably will try to find a used prime of some sort as well.

Many kind thanks for taking the time to share this information. Its much appreciated. Since I joined and posted this I have been over looking at and really enjoying the lighthouses thread.
Regards
 

DeeJayK

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The problem with using a manual adapter with modern F-mount lenses is that I don't believe those lenses have a manual aperture ring, so you would effectively have no way to change the aperture.

You would want an adapter that has electronic contacts (like the Viltrox NF-M1) which would allow full control of the aperture and even afford you autofocus. The downside is that such an adapter runs around US$200 (likely more in Ecuador) or about 10 times the price of a manual adapter.

The other caveat is that those two Nikkor zooms don't give you much more than the pair of zooms you already own. In fact, I'd probably take the Olympus lenses in a shootout. Not to mention the Nikkors are consider bulkier. I don't know much about that 35mm 1.8, but that's the only lens of those three I'd really consider a potential upgrade.

So I think I'd pass on the Nikon lenses. The next question becomes what's the most cost effective way to improve your kit. It's hard to say whether you'll get more noticeable improvement from lenses or a new body, but what's certain is that the lenses will hold their value better, which makes me think you'd be better off upgrading the glass first.

It sounds to me like maybe you just need something different from what you have. Since you're covered for kinda slow zooms, maybe a fast prime would be a way to spice things up. There are lots of good options in that category, that are quite affordable: Oly 17/1.8, Panasonic 20/1.7, Sigma 30/1.4, Oly 45/1.8 come to mind.

Since it sounds like you are at least willing to consider manual focus, there are also a lot of amazing primes from China (TTArtisan would be my first choice), that are dirt cheap.

- K
 
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orphanedinode

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Hi DeeJayK
You are correct no aperture ring on any of them.
I also agree with glass first and may try to do a little of both if I can find the newer EM 1 ii or a used iii. I have the TTArtisan site bookmarked and have seen some of their offerings. They look pretty interesting considering price point for primes.

Weird thing about here is I can go back to the US, buy a camera, lenses and a bag, throw the boxes away, stuff everything in the bag and when I come back I pay no duty-- camera and lenses are for "personal use"..... really quickly make up the airline ticket price plus accommodations considering what the duty would be on an OM1 ii or iii and a couple of lenses....going to research your lens suggestions for a fast prime.

Thanks very much for the interest and suggestions, much appreciated.
Regards
 

DeeJayK

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Hi DeeJayK
...
Weird thing about here is I can go back to the US, buy a camera, lenses and a bag, throw the boxes away, stuff everything in the bag and when I come back I pay no duty-- camera and lenses are for "personal use"..... really quickly make up the airline ticket price plus accommodations considering what the duty would be on an OM1 ii or iii and a couple of lenses
Sounds to me like a great way to justify a "free" trip to the US. ;)

It might be interesting if you could post some images where you feel your gear has let you down in some way. That way perhaps we can help diagnose whether the limitation is more likely to be due to the camera/sensor or the lens. If your issues are caused by having to use higher ISOs than you'd like, these could be addressed either with a newer camera (which would have better high ISO performance) or by using faster glass (or both).

I'd be really interested to see what sort of difference you'd notice in shooting with a fast prime. Given that you said you primarily shoot landscapes, you might want to consider a couple of wider options than the ones I mentioned. Venus Optics makes a couple of nice ultra-wide options in the Laowa 7.5mm f/2 and the 10mm f/2. There's also the Samyang 12mm f/2 as well as a couple of cheaper Chinese options in that focal length from Pergear, Meike and 7Artisans, although I don't have experience with any of these last options. On the slightly higher end there's also the Olympus 12mm f/2, which of course offers AF.

- K
 
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WaltP

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Well, for the price difference on an E-M1mk2 and a 12-100, you can have me buy them here and you fly me down there to deliver them. That sounds like the easiest solution, and more fun than trying to describe what your current setup is missing that would improve your photography. The original E-M5 is still a wonderful camera. It has not changed; what has?

Maybe those extra funds can be used for a trip? Argentina's mountains? Some coastal land & sea scapes? The desert?

For perspective, I just got to see the show "Vital Waters" again. The glass and body you have easily match what Adams used.
 
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Hendrik

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I'd pass on the Nikkors. When I bought an E-M5 (came with a 12-50) I experimented with my Nikkor glass on an adapter and quickly determined (for my own use cases) that native m43 lenses would be far more likely to give me a frictionless experience. F-mount AF-D and G lenses are unrewarding as manual focus lenses. I still have the Nikkors and the adapter and, with one exception, never use them with m43 cameras. The exception is a 28mm f/3.5 PC (shift) manual focus lens. At least this way I always know where the adapter can be found. ;)

I'd second the 12-100 suggestion.
 
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I concur with the advice to get a used or reconditioned EM1 II and 12-100 f4 Pro. The latter lens and body would provide excellent IQ and the 12-100 pretty much covers the useful ranges of the 12-50/40-150 R combo. The 12-100 also gets close enough that you probably won't miss the close-up capability of the 12-50 much. The AF with the EM1 II would be fast, and you could use S-AF and C-AF with confidence. Plus, it's all weather-sealed and dust resistant. That would be a good foundation to add more lenses on later.

It just so happens that getolympus.com (USA) is having a limited time coupon sale on select reconditioned items, among them the EM1 II.

OM-D E-M1 Mark II (body)$999.99
$799.99 discounted with code
$200 saving
 
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Hendrik

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...I am shooting with just CDAF-- the somewhat limited EM5 viewfinder can make manual focusing difficult ( I shoot most of my work in manual because of CDAF and DOF limitations given the lens F stop limitations and what noise higher iso's produce)...
A budget compromise for you might be to pick up a used E-M5 Mark II. With the addition of native focus peaking, manual focusing is virtually the equal of all OM-Ds after the original E-M5. You would also step up to (tripod) HiRes as well as in-body focus stacking (in the latest firmware.) I think it has a smidge more dynamic range than the original as well as more competent IBIS. PDAF isn't particularly critical for stationary subjects (even macro) - for those, CDAF will be more accurate the overwhelming majority of the time.
 

Bushboy

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If I was you, all I would do, is get a used M5mkii body. Keep your kit lenses. Nothing at all wrong with them. Maybe get a 30mm macro so you can focus stack quickly, the close stuff. It makes such a difference.
M1 mkii and 12-100 Pro. = serious money everywhere!
I am curious about the kit lens limitations your seeing? We need more info! Both those lenses in my opinion, do fabulous work for me. So pleased with them in every way.
 
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I've all 3 versions of EM5
The change for me from 1 to 2 was marked.
Better viewfinder being No 1.
The 20 vs 16 sensor wasn't so much better to appreciate IMO.
Overall refinement in use, customisation, buttons etc.
Round 2 was and is a well polished camera.
Whilst the 3 is nice, it didn't do as much for me when I bought my 2 and looked at previous model.
Lenses : I've played with adapters and my Pentax glass.
They live in their bag these days.
I've Pro Olympus glass, but do have 75-300mm and 17 1.8.
Latter gets its use, former little these days, but it's a very capable lense.

Glass is important, but so is technique and just your general approach to photography.

All the best with your decision.
 

orphanedinode

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Well all of you are great!! I have been gone away for a day and look at all the great info!!
Lets see--Hey WaltP Sounds like a good idea no?? Come on down. In fact all of you come down and we can start an Olympus expedition to walk from here to Cape Horn at the tip..after all summer is coming to the Southern Hemisphere and I am told summer in Patagonia is absolutely spectacular!!
Hendrik--Thanks for the information, I have already decided to stay with either Oly or other u4/3 lenses. Life is complex enough...

I have considered a used or reconditioned EM5 ii. My reasoning is this- if I am going to spend the money on a body might it not be the best idea to get the best body I can even if it financially hurts a bit? Considering that from rumors sometime between now and Christmas isnt Oly supposed to release the next "super camera"? If that happens one might surmise that there could be some EM1 ii's and possibly some iii's either reconditioned or used that might start to surface for bargains, yes??
A 30 mm macro for focus stacking would be a great idea.I have seen what focus stacking will allow and its pretty miraculous...
Bushboy & Avondale87 thanks dfor the info and suggestions. Holoholo55 thanks very much for the info on the sale. I hope it might be possible to capture a ii with either the 12-40 Pro or the 12-100 Pro. In addition to all of this I would like to have the option to eventually get some glass and do birds and wildlife. For that PDAF and big glass.......

Ultimately it means a trip back to the US and probably a week there more or less. From what i hear from friends in the US there is a lot of camera equipment on the used market. Maybe I can get back there and pick up a prime or two as well as some Pro glass.....
this from a couple of days ago here in my garden, a shot of some really small flowers!! Camera at F16,1/100th, 640 ISO ORF file developed in Darktable, almost no sharpening, a little vibrance and chroma boost but not much.... exported to jpg. My camera still takes good photos.
DeeJayKay thanks for your input as well I also would like to see how my OM5 would shoot with a fast prime....
Thanks to all of you for the interest and great info.....
 

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WaltP

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You might be joking but, as winter approaches, I'm not. The last few years have seen me escape to Mexico's Pacific coast, but I've been hankering for a longer adventure. I've also been waiting to walk the pilgrimage road across France (Francigena), but they have been COVID hot and don't want dirty gringos.

A pilgrimage across South America sounds about perfect for a wintery trek.

Just have the camera shipped to me and tell me which flight to be on (from Denver if possible, but I can get to Albuquerque or Dallas if needed). I couldn't leave until after the U.S. Gran Prix at the end of October, and I don't really need to be back until mid-April.

Heck yes, I'm serious.
 
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orphanedinode

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You might be joking but, as winter approaches, I'm not. The last few years have seen me escape to Mexico's Pacific coast, but I've been hankering for a longer adventure. I've also been waiting to walk the pilgrimage road across France (Francigena), but they have been COVID hot and don't want dirty gringos.

A pilgrimage across South America sounds about perfect for a wintery trek.

Just have the camera shipped to me and tell me which flight to be on (from Denver if possible, but I can get to Albuquerque or Dallas if needed). I couldn't leave until after the U.S. Gran Prix at the end of October, and I don't really need to be back until mid-April.

Heck yes, I'm serious.
Hey Walt....
Lets see. Spent 6 hours today on a face with the slope between 60 and 80%. Jungled. Had to cut our way up literally. Sedimentary rock or what happens to lava after it ages a few thousand years.... where there wasnt mud. Strewn with I am pretty sure granite boulders everything from the size of your foot to the size of an oil drum. I had gone in and cut part of the trail a few days ago on a jungled 30-40% grade (same composition) so today when I decided on the pack to wear- my Gregory Denali Pro --and how to pack it- I figured we might have to contend with maybe a 60% grade the higher we got. BIG mistake. Parts of the trip up were just damn near vertical. Most of it was more or less stable but it was arguably stupid. I was joined by a friend of mine, a cowherd named Manuel. He runs a dozen cows in there on the river bottom and has for the past 30 or so years....the river is 8400' above sea level where we are. He has never tried to go up the walls. He didnt have a pack and he and I alternated breaking trail on some of the worst parts. He is 83 this year. I am 70. Its some of the worst terrain I have done since I walked to the Ciudad Perdido- Lost City- inland from the Northern Colombian Coast when I first came down here in 2012. God put all the thorn bushes in front of us today...... I look like I have been in an oil drum with a couple of pumas......Where we are trying to go is a cave mouth on the face, a place so difficult to get to that I am going to guess its maybe been visited only by some tribe that lived between the volcanoes in time-out-of-mind. You are familiar with the Mexico Pacific Coast. When I lived down there (lived in Cuernavaca for a year and Boca del Rio, just south of Veracruz, for 9 years) I would go over inland from Acapulco in the Sierra Madre mountains and do this type of thing then. I am pretty sure some of the places I went only the Maya or maybe the Olmec had been there, maybe on a migration that led to the construction of Teotihuacan...

OK. Lets see. I also was going to Europe this spring and walk the Camino de Santiago de Compostela, I was going to walk the route along the Portuguese coast, up into Spain and to the Compostela. A well detailed page on this is here

https://www.elcaminoconcorreos.com/en/blog/camino-de-santiago-and-covid-19

I like you found it impossible because both Portugal and Spain were closed and are closed to anyone who comes there from Ecuador. So I am still here.......
As far as adventures here first thing to do is start up Google Earth and compare the distances you were going to walk in Europe to those in South American. Here things are huge, there are still un contacted tribes if one chooses to go down the basin rather than along the mountain littoral of the Andes. Neither is easy and unlike Europe where most of the places you are going to walk are reasonably populated, here they are not. Logistics on the Camino de Compostela depending on the route is nothing more than walking from hostel to hostel. Here there are places where you can walk for weeks and no one is around. And the country is much like what I was in today or worse. A lot worse. I have a friend who did his doctoral in linguistics in the Peruvian Amazon, studying an isolated tribe. To get there took the better part of 2 weeks by boat. So it s different here. A place I lived for a couple of months with the Kechua tribe was outside of a place called Tena in a tiny community of Mariposa. We would routinely walk 2-3 days to visit surrounding villages on trail networks that had existed for centuries. They knew how to live in the jungle, we never carried rice or beans or any sort of staples. The jungle would provide. I do not flatter myself thinking I can do that, I can not. Its a life you have to be born into I believe...

Most of the people who do the Patagonia trail leave the US on motorcycles, then through Mexico and central America, then across the Darien Gap on a ferry that runs intermittently, into Colombia, then down through here in Ecuador, Peru and from there a number of routes that lead ultimately to Patagonia either on the Argentinian or Chilean side. Most dont make it. After Mexico Central America, and Colombia there are a lot of motorcycles for sale here and Peru. For those that do many take their bikes across to Uruguay (the only country that legally allows sale of vehicles that were not imported to that country when new) and fly home. I guess where I am going with this is to say that there is a LOT of really hard country here. In 2021 Ecuador is maybe 60% electrified, MAYBE. At least 40% of the country population wise has no electricity. Look at one of the GOES satellites a night view of Ecuador and follow it south on the Amazon Basin to the mountains of Patagonia.... and you see...no lights. No roads. No internet. Carry a water filter and filter all your water. The only electronic help you get in areas like these is with a device called SPOT.

https://www.findmespot.com/en-us/

So an Olympus expedition is maybe possible. You could spend a year easy walking from here to Cape Horn, maybe more. I am saying all of this (after a shower and a nap) to stress that it is difficult both from the physical side of doing it and can be horribly complicated logistics wise. Plus I am retired and even though in pretty good shape physically for 70 I am very limited in what I can do financially so thats a consideration for me. Photos I have attached are both taken from the lip of the canyon on the other side of the river. In the second photo you can see the semi circular mouth of the cave.

I am not trying to discourage your coming to South America but I dont want you to come down here and discover how different it is from the Pacific Coast of Mexico. Had I to spend a winter somewhere I would spend it in Mexico rather than here. The surfing is good. The senoritas are prettier. The tequila is excellent. The food is better. And its a hell of a lot more relaxing than what I did today......:)
Food for thought.
Edit..... I am probably going to meet Manuel tomorrow in the river bottom. It may take us at least another day of cutting trail to get to the cave even if its possible. I took these shots this morning around 8 AM from the side of the canyon opposite the cave. Processed to jpg in Darktable. Nothing else done.
 

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WaltP

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Hey Walt....
Lets see. Spent 6 hours today on a face with the slope between 60 and 80%. Jungled. Had to cut our way up literally. Sedimentary rock or what happens to lava after it ages a few thousand years.... where there wasnt mud. Strewn with I am pretty sure granite boulders everything from the size of your foot to the size of an oil drum. I had gone in and cut part of the trail a few days ago on a jungled 30-40% grade (same composition) so today when I decided on the pack to wear- my Gregory Denali Pro --and how to pack it- I figured we might have to contend with maybe a 60% grade the higher we got. BIG mistake. Parts of the trip up were just damn near vertical. Most of it was more or less stable but it was arguably stupid. I was joined by a friend of mine, a cowherd named Manuel. He runs a dozen cows in there on the river bottom and has for the past 30 or so years....the river is 8400' above sea level where we are. He has never tried to go up the walls. He didnt have a pack and he and I alternated breaking trail on some of the worst parts. He is 83 this year. I am 70. Its some of the worst terrain I have done since I walked to the Ciudad Perdido- Lost City- inland from the Northern Colombian Coast when I first came down here in 2012. God put all the thorn bushes in front of us today...... I look like I have been in an oil drum with a couple of pumas......Where we are trying to go is a cave mouth on the face, a place so difficult to get to that I am going to guess its maybe been visited only by some tribe that lived between the volcanoes in time-out-of-mind. You are familiar with the Mexico Pacific Coast. When I lived down there (lived in Cuernavaca for a year and Boca del Rio, just south of Veracruz, for 9 years) I would go over inland from Acapulco in the Sierra Madre mountains and do this type of thing then. I am pretty sure some of the places I went only the Maya or maybe the Olmec had been there, maybe on a migration that led to the construction of Teotihuacan...

OK. Lets see. I also was going to Europe this spring and walk the Camino de Santiago de Compostela, I was going to walk the route along the Portuguese coast, up into Spain and to the Compostela. A well detailed page on this is here

https://www.elcaminoconcorreos.com/en/blog/camino-de-santiago-and-covid-19

I like you found it impossible because both Portugal and Spain were closed and are closed to anyone who comes there from Ecuador. So I am still here.......
As far as adventures here first thing to do is start up Google Earth and compare the distances you were going to walk in Europe to those in South American. Here things are huge, there are still un contacted tribes if one chooses to go down the basin rather than along the mountain littoral of the Andes. Neither is easy and unlike Europe where most of the places you are going to walk are reasonably populated, here they are not. Logistics on the Camino de Compostela depending on the route is nothing more than walking from hostel to hostel. Here there are places where you can walk for weeks and no one is around. And the country is much like what I was in today or worse. A lot worse. I have a friend who did his doctoral in linguistics in the Peruvian Amazon, studying an isolated tribe. To get there took the better part of 2 weeks by boat. So it s different here. A place I lived for a couple of months with the Kechua tribe was outside of a place called Tena in a tiny community of Mariposa. We would routinely walk 2-3 days to visit surrounding villages on trail networks that had existed for centuries. They knew how to live in the jungle, we never carried rice or beans or any sort of staples. The jungle would provide. I do not flatter myself thinking I can do that, I can not. Its a life you have to be born into I believe...

Most of the people who do the Patagonia trail leave the US on motorcycles, then through Mexico and central America, then across the Darien Gap on a ferry that runs intermittently, into Colombia, then down through here in Ecuador, Peru and from there a number of routes that lead ultimately to Patagonia either on the Argentinian or Chilean side. Most dont make it. After Mexico Central America, and Colombia there are a lot of motorcycles for sale here and Peru. For those that do many take their bikes across to Uruguay (the only country that legally allows sale of vehicles that were not imported to that country when new) and fly home. I guess where I am going with this is to say that there is a LOT of really hard country here. In 2021 Ecuador is maybe 60% electrified, MAYBE. At least 40% of the country population wise has no electricity. Look at one of the GOES satellites a night view of Ecuador and follow it south on the Amazon Basin to the mountains of Patagonia.... and you see...no lights. No roads. No internet. Carry a water filter and filter all your water. The only electronic help you get in areas like these is with a device called SPOT.

https://www.findmespot.com/en-us/

So an Olympus expedition is maybe possible. You could spend a year easy walking from here to Cape Horn, maybe more. I am saying all of this (after a shower and a nap) to stress that it is difficult both from the physical side of doing it and can be horribly complicated logistics wise. Plus I am retired and even though in pretty good shape physically for 70 I am very limited in what I can do financially so thats a consideration for me. Photos I have attached are both taken from the lip of the canyon on the other side of the river. In the second photo you can see the semi circular mouth of the cave.

I am not trying to discourage your coming to South America but I dont want you to come down here and discover how different it is from the Pacific Coast of Mexico. Had I to spend a winter somewhere I would spend it in Mexico rather than here. The surfing is good. The senoritas are prettier. The tequila is excellent. The food is better. And its a hell of a lot more relaxing than what I did today......:)
Food for thought.
Edit..... I am probably going to meet Manuel tomorrow in the river bottom. It may take us at least another day of cutting trail to get to the cave even if its possible. I took these shots this morning around 8 AM from the side of the canyon opposite the cave. Processed to jpg in Darktable. Nothing else done.
Thats one crazy cliff face to cut.
I would not hope to go north to south walking inanything less than a l-o-n-g time. Driving might be great fun, with photo stops along the way.
When Portugal reopens for you, I suggest the central route, the coastal path is lovely, but boring - a lot of tourism along the coast until well north of Porto.
I am also 70+ and claimed near perfect health until a major stroke a few years ago forced retirement (only a year early). Doing the Camino was a celebration of learning to walk again. I chose Portugal to avoid the crowds. Not socially averse, but it is more work for me than for a neuro-typical person.
I am not much of a jungle explorer, much prefer the drier climes - but, since the stroke, I find I need SO MUCH more water than i used to. Pity, that. Social isolation is actually a preferred state, though I have learned, over the years, to function in many social environments, for longer sessions.

I would consider a long journey in South America a real blessing. Scale like southern Africa I would think, which I thoroughly enjoyed. And the ability to get away from the tropics - which always seem to want to kill me - at least my respiratory system.

I have considered flying down and getting a car to wander solo for awhile, I COULD drop off your camera and get a car to wander (I have contacts everywhere) while you hack new trails through the jungle. And you would save a lot of money, which I appreciate as a retiree.
 

RAH

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Rich
I like the idea of you getting an E-M1 Mark II (or E-M5 Mark III; not so much the Mark II), but I'm going to stick my neck out here - please folks, he said he is on a LIMITED budget! - and say to not get the 12-100. I am not criticizing that lens - DON'T SHOOT ME! But I think that the lenses you have are good, and maybe as @Bushboy said, add the 30mm macro. I think the improvements you'd get from the E-M1 Mark II or the E-M5 Mark III are well worth putting your limited funds there.
 

orphanedinode

Mu-43 Rookie
Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
11
Hello All.... since my last long post to Walt, yesterday was spent doing what a single person does, cooking, house cleaning, laundry yadayadayada. I had much rather have been out shooting or out on the bike although I did get one short ride in.

Lets see...davidzvi thanks for the comment and interest. I think you are probably correct on your take on the Nikon lens list but I have decided to forego those. Interestingly the guy with the lens list got in touch with the shop owner where he posted his list saying he had another body and some lenses for sale..... She gave me his number, I left a message and a text and so far no response..... after all of this I think I am going to stick with u4/3 and with Oly.

RAH thanks for the kind interest. I think your suggested path forward is a good one. Get a body first and shoot my glass with that...either a EM1 ii or iii is what I am prone to consider or possibly the EM 5 iii. Then adjust glass as necessary. I do want a prime and some sort of macro although the macro function on the glass I have has so far done well....

Finally Walt P..... Sounds like you have been adventuring and I give you cudos and admire what you have done particularly in response to the health setback you had. I would at some point like to discuss with you more the Camino: I think what you did is just excellent absolutely! Far as coming here and renting a car and taking off it most times isnt possible particularly in crossing national borders. Every country is different with the currency, entry and exit requirement both for you and for the vehicle and so on. When I lived in Mexico I used to go down into Central America to surf, I still had a vehicle then. Going from country to country was a PITA. When I first got here back in in 2012 I almost bought a KTM adventure bike to travel on. Problem is this...in most countries you enter on foot with a visa you can stay anywhere from 3 to 6 months. With a vehicle you are limited to either 30 or 60 days. Then the vehicle has to leave. Gasoline outside of Ecuador is very expensive right up there with European prices. If you are goin to buy something with 4 wheels diesel is absolutely the way to go in South America. Even more complicated is that these policies change from year to year depending on the country and sometimes from month to month. So its not simple. At all. In addition to all of this I cant stress enough that speaking the language is an absolute necessity ( Spanish or Portuguese for Brazil) but I would imagine you already have this down. Areas where I have roamed almost no one spoke English and in a few tribal areas almost no one spoke Spanish.... I really do want to go to Europe and spend time there. Aside from what we see for cost of living on Numbeo.com, from people here who have lived in Spain and Portugal most say that life outside of the cities there is very doable on a fraction of the living expenses indicated on Numbeo so its a consideration..... Do your homework spend time investigating the individual country websites for places you think you might want to go....all of my travels here since I got off the ship I came down on in Cartagena Colombia in 2012 have been by public bus. It can be tiring but its a good way to see the terrain, meet the people and know the culture. Having your own vehicle is somewhat preferable but with its own complications.... hope this helps.

Waterfall is between the top of the climb on the highway route out of Quito to Baeza Ecuador--the high mountains here are full of waterfalls. On this trip the highest altitude I saw on the gps on the highway route (I was on a bus) was around 14,500 feet. This was a little lower. Processing done in Darktable with some retouching done to edit out a twig in the foreground. Note this was taken from a moving bus. This is typical of mountain terrain here. I can not help but marvel at the tenacity of the Spanish who explored this area.

Thanks all of you for the kind interest and great suggestions.....
 

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