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Opportunity cost and lens arrays

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by crossen, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. crossen

    crossen Mu-43 Regular

    67
    Apr 26, 2014
    Ohio
    I use an Oly EM 10 and a Pana 20mm f1.7 and an Oly 45mm 1.8. I am very happy with them but I realize that if i have one on the camera it excludes using the other at that moment.

    In economics this is called "opportunity cost." That is, by doing one thing, one of the costs is the things you could have done with that time or money. For me, buying and using another lens means i am excluding myself from using the 20 or the 45.

    It happened to me recently to be in Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, and I happened to have the 45mm on the camera, instead of the 20 or a wide angle lens on one of my former cameras. i found my photos with the 45 were the best I have ever taken of Notre Dame in all my many trips to Paris. Looking at them I felt lucky not to have bought a wide angle lens use for indoor architectural photos (the classic choice for this purpose).

    Crossen
     
  2. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    ???

    You've got me thinking...should I have another beer, or maybe a red. If I have a beer, I'm excluding myself from having a red. But after just having a chicken schnitzel dinner with steamed veg, is a red appropriate? I find that beer is best after a salty meal, but then the red beckons.
     
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  3. Geoff3DMN

    Geoff3DMN Mu-43 Veteran

    There are two possible solutions that occur to me, replace the 2 primes with a zoom lens (say a 12-40 or 12-35 f2.8) or get a 2nd body and put the 2nd prime on the second body.
     
  4. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I think there's something about creative limitation that could be relevant here...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. tino84

    tino84 Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Dec 29, 2013
    don't worry about, if you won't use your 20mm anymore, I can take it with me and give an home, I can make it for free obviously :)

    seriously, I won't care, a lens is your "eye on the camera", if you feel good and can take good pic because you can "see" them through your preferred lens, I won't worry about: you'll find the right time, even if few, for a lens or another
     
  6. Vivalo

    Vivalo Olympus Loser

    931
    Nov 16, 2010
    Finland
    It is fun to take only one lens (and not always the usual go-to lens) when going on casual outings. I prefer the 17mm lens, but sometimes take 45mm, 25mm, 14mm or even a fisheye with me for a walk. It's refreshing to see the same things in another perspective. But Ray, when it comes to drinks, I don't think it is refreshing to limit your self to just Beer or Red. The morning after is a different story, but then you feel even more melancholic and arty.
     
  7. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    As a born and bred Finn, I used to enjoy spirits (I still don't mind the occasional rum, maybe a gin and tonic, or a shot of vodka from the freezer), but nowadays it's pretty much beer and red. There's lots of choices in beer and red to keep one's inspiration going all day. :)
     
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  8. tjdean01

    tjdean01 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    842
    Feb 20, 2013
    This is something I have mentioned before and it went greatly misunderstood and turned into an argument of primes vs zooms. My point, however, was that when you're forced to do something you don't want to do, which, in this case, is to shoot with the FL you would not otherwise choose, you get different results. Those results might be appealing.

    I have two examples. I took a 40mm to an auto show. Usually didn't get the whole car in. Images were phenomenal. Second, I forgot my lens bag and ended up with nothing but the 7.5 and the 15. The results were very creative. "Wide angle closeups" were what I needed to blur the background; and I liked the results.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Nah.. opportunity cost is buying a lens instead of dedicating resources to investments that would otherwise provide positive growth. :biggrin:

    You don't come to a photography gear forum and talk to about opportunity costs..... we eat opportunities for dinner and spit it out... then pass around beers toasting to the wonderfulness of G.A.S.
     
  10. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    But seriously..

    I think if you change your mindset from "driving your intent by choice of equipment" to "choosing your equipment by your intent", you will begin to see the situation differently. Rather than trying to capture everything (the same location in 2, 3, or more focal lengths) think about what you really want the final outcome to be. Think of what you want the "viewer" of the resulting photo to see and feel.

    When I'm walking around taking pictures on a busy street (I kinda hate the term street photography), I'm thinking... am I telling a story... or am i interested in a subject. Do I want to bring the viewer to a single subject in a small space? Do I want to tell a story about a space, the people in it, and how it all interacts with each other?

    Don't shoehorn yourself into a formula in which all architecture/landscapes are shot wide, portraits are always shot long, and street is shot with a normal. For each person that argues with me that portraits are only shot with longer focal lengths, I can show you many examples that are counter. The same goes with any other photography.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    I had a similar experience several years ago as I was just getting more serious about photography. I had a job downtown and there was a river nearby with birds in constant supply. I wanted to give my hand a try at taking some bird photos, so I took my camera and my telephoto lens and walked down to the river. After I took the bird photos, I noticed there were a lot of buildings in disrepair in the area and thought they would make some interesting photos. But all I had was my telephoto lens. So I used it. I quite liked the photos. But I shared them on another photography site and they didn't get a positive response. I learned a few things from that experience. One was what I think the OP was talking about. Seeing things differently than you normally would because you were forced to. Sometimes the results can be quite nice. The other was that just because others didn't appreciate the photos didn't mean they were bad. The photos connected with a mood for me. A mood of decay so to speak. A mood of neglect. To others I guess they just showed telephoto shots of old buildings. Oh well.
     
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  12. crossen

    crossen Mu-43 Regular

    67
    Apr 26, 2014
    Ohio
    Thank you for this post and for sharing your experience. What you describe is exactly what I meant in my post, and your experience parallels mine.

    An unusual lens choice for a situation can give unusually good results, probably because the results are not stereotypical or hackneyed or conventional.

    Long ago, in film days, a professional photographer, Erwin Fieger, got separated from most of his lenses during an airplane trip to London; all he had was a 200mm on a film camera to use for a whole weekend in London. The result is in his book, "London, City of Any Dream."

    And I agree that a photo can be excellent even though others don't like it, probably because it is unconventional and different from what they are used to seeing.

    Discomfort with the untraditional can result in carefully disguised ridicule, as in the sophomoric jokes about choice of beer that grace this thread.

    Again, thank you for seriously considering what I said and for sharing your experience.

    Crossen
     
  13. tjdean01

    tjdean01 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    842
    Feb 20, 2013
    I posted earlier about how much fun limiting yourself can be. That's why people go camping, watch shows about being deserted on an island, or like being caught in the rain.

    I have some better examples with lenses that were too long for the the situation, but for now, no one with a zoom lens would have taken the following two shots at 15mm f8

    13905651144_65e0a39298_c.

    15493390288_249ff163eb_c.
     
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  14. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    Ray, for us undereducated, lacking in both class and proper upbringing Yanks - what's a 'red'? :confused:

    Regards,

    Jim
     
  15. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    A bottle/glass of red wine. :)
     
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  16. CameraNoob

    CameraNoob Mu-43 Regular

    42
    Aug 22, 2014
    Atlanta
    I find the prime lenses add a special touch or characteristic you can't get with a zoom
     
  17. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    I find zoom lenses add a special touch or characteristic you can't get with a prime.
     
  18. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    I find pinhole and zone sieve lenses add a special touch or characteristic you can't get with a normally functioning lens...


    I partially agree, if you're forced to use only what you have on hand you will get results you don't expect... on the other hand you can also get rubbish. I was in a rush and grabbed my 25mm f1.8 and just went with it, what I thought was the 25mm was actually the 45mm f1.8 and was completely useless at the close ranges required in the venue (in low light, so even less dof).

    I think the best reason of all of them to use the f1.4 over the f1.8 25mm lenses is so you don't confuse it with the 45mm.
     
  19. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Why not just get it in a different colour or something?