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OMD-E-D-10

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by photoeagle, Jan 31, 2016.

  1. photoeagle

    photoeagle Mu-43 Regular

    65
    Apr 25, 2015
    Brad Harris
    A few questions what to add with a camera purchase. I understand the basics such as a SD card, camera bag, lens cleaning. What else should be considered?
    An additional question how much post proceasing do you do to your photos? What program do you use?

    Overall do you shot more often in raw? What are the benefits of shooting in raw?
     
  2. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    Photoshop Elements (I think it's V14 now) is a good software package to start with and it's not too expensive. I shoot raw +jpeg, but usually process the raw files for my final images. Raw files let you do better with sharpening , noise reduction, etc. If you are starting, the Jpegs are very good and you can still touch them up in Photoshop.

    Adobe Photoshop Elements 14 (Download) 65263826 B&H Photo Video
     
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  3. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Hi,

    1. extra battery (Progo and Wasabi are decent and are much cheaper than OEM. You can find a set of 2 with a travel charger for around $25USD on Amazon or eBay)

    2. possibly a sling or wrist strap. I like Peak Design's products, but there are many others.

    3. I almost always shoot RAW only; if I suspect I might need to provide JPEGs right away after an event, I'll shoot RAW+SHF JPEG.

    Shooting RAW gives you easy & lossless white balance correction, more Dynamic Range (more forgiveness for overexposure, etc.), more noise correction options, ...
    Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3) comes with your camera... it's really slow so I'd recommend one of the other RAW developers.

    Software I use - I'm a big fan of free & OpenSource apps:
    RawTherapee for RAW processing / cropping / etc
    GIMP for more advanced editing

    DigiKam for cataloging / Digital Asset Management (DAM). Also can do basic RAW development and editing, but I'm already used to RT.
    My review of DigiKam as a DAM (Digital Asset Manager)

    XnViewMP for quick image review/browsing (I've mostly moved to DigiKam but still use this often for an initial pass over a recent shoot, as it's faster). free, but not OpenSource.

    All of the above can run on Mac OSX, Windows, & Linux

    Other free SW:
    DarkTable - DAM + RAW development; probably similar in features to Lightroom; Mac OSX and Linux only (no Windows)
    Photivo: RAW processor. Has some film emulations and some other features that aren't in RT, but it was a bit slow and buggy last time I tried it.

    Occasionally I'll use EXIFTool, Hugin, Luminance HDR...

    Barry
     
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  4. Sniksekk

    Sniksekk Mu-43 Veteran

    333
    Apr 7, 2015
    Are you buying E-M10 ?
    I would get hold of ECG-1 grip as well as Peak Design Cuff (or other wristband).
    The grip might look expensive, but it is worth every penny in my opinion.
     
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  5. MoonMind

    MoonMind Mu-43 Top Veteran

    626
    Oct 25, 2014
    Switzerland
    Matt
    I shoot in RAW exclusively - not because Olympus JPEGs are bad (on the contrary), but because I've come to really like the additional control over the actual output - I think if you're considering doing post processing at all, you might as well work from RAW. In most cases, it's definitely worth it - curves and highlight/shadow recovery for more control over dynamic range, generally optimising sharpness, colours, contrast, noise ...

    When it comes to software, my choices are somewhat limited because I'm a dedicated GNU/Linux user. I usually use Darktable, but would also consider RawTherapee if more control is your thing (not that Darktable is bad in that respect - it's considerably less cluttered, but also offers a little less in terms of tools and features). RawTherapee is available for all major platforms, and also as a portable version for Windows.

    I concur with the recommendation of the ECG-1 if you intend to use bigger lenses; I personally hardly ever take it off my E-M10 even when using small primes - it's just so much more comfortable. It's easy to remove, so changing the battery and removing the SD card isn't a problem. I also use the Peak Design Leash and Cuff as a strap and wrist strap - they work great for this small camera.

    M.
     
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  6. photoeagle

    photoeagle Mu-43 Regular

    65
    Apr 25, 2015
    Brad Harris
    Thanks. Yes I'm considering the E-M10, as my first mu 4/3 camera. It has been awhile since I have had an interchangeable camera.
     
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  7. Prahasaurus

    Prahasaurus Mu-43 Regular

    74
    Jan 30, 2016
    Prague, Czech Republic
    I wouldn't drop a lot of money on PP software unless you are sure this is the way you will go. Assuming you are not a professional photographer, it's not a must to shoot in RAW, Olympus JPEGs are fantastic. Yes, you do have reduced options after you take the shot, but this also forces you to think more when you take your pics. I had planned to shoot mainly RAW, but I learned over time that it's just not for me, so now I shoot almost exclusively in JPEG.

    The beauty of most 4/3 systems (all?) is you can shoot in both JPEG and RAW, or only JPEG, or only RAW. So you can work in whatever format works best for you. And it may take some time to figure that out.

    I would also recommend a prime lens or two. If you're doing a lot of street, travel, or family shooting, I would recommend the 17mm 1.8. It's my go-to lens. I almost never shoot with a telephoto lens now.
     
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  8. Rick F

    Rick F Mu-43 Regular

    124
    Jul 5, 2015
    UK
    Rick
    First thing I did when buying my E-M10 was to upgrade to the two lens bundle. It's cheaper to get the two standard kits lenses (14-42 & 40-150) so you already have a good focal range.
    I'd second the spare batteries. It eliminates worrying about turning the camera on and off to save power. A 32GB card should be enough for most day trips, even when shooting with RAW+JPG.
    If you intend to buy a camera bag, look for one that will suit your final needs so you won't have to keep upgrading each time you buy some new kit. Maybe also a small bag for when using just one or two lenses.
    After that, it depends on what sort of photography you wish to pursue.
     
  9. photoeagle

    photoeagle Mu-43 Regular

    65
    Apr 25, 2015
    Brad Harris
    Do you guys use any filters?
     
  10. Sniksekk

    Sniksekk Mu-43 Veteran

    333
    Apr 7, 2015
    8 stop ND filter on 12-40 mm
    UV on both 17mm and 45.
    Kind of regretting not buying UV to 12-40 lens. It's been a rough life for it, but it's unmanaged.
     
  11. Carbonman

    Carbonman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 10, 2014
    Vancouver BC
    Graham
    I have an 8 stop ND and a Heliopan linear polarizer in 72mm with a 62-72 step up ring so I can use them on both the 12-40 and 40-150 zooms.
    If you buy a polarizer, try and get linear (even buy used) and you will get much stronger polarization.
     
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  12. MoonMind

    MoonMind Mu-43 Top Veteran

    626
    Oct 25, 2014
    Switzerland
    Matt
    I'd read up on the pros and cons of protective/UV filters on digital cameras if I were you - I have formed an opinion, but YMMV. I fully agree on the usefulness of an ND8 (or variable ND) filter; I own a high-quality ND8 filter for the 12-40mm (and an additional variable one of questionable quality that nevertheless enabled me to shoot a partial solar eclipse).

    Slightly off-topic: On film cameras, UV/skylight filters are indeed helpful; funnily enough, I've boosted the quality of a quite limited camera (a Lomo'Instant!) by adding UV and ND8 filters - the latter one actually finally makes for satisfying daylight shooting with a camera that's more or less made for indoor use with flash; IQ (colour and detail) is also noticeably better when using the UV in lower light.

    A few words about lenses: The four I use most are the 12-40mm f/2.8, the 17mm f/1.8, the 25mm f/1.8 and the 14-150mm II f/4.0-5.6. It's the latter one I wanted to add to those already mentioned as a really compelling all-in-one solution. It proved a very satisfying lens for travelling light (I paired it with the 17mm for low light and street shooting - today however, I'd pick the 25mm because it's considerably sharper and contrastier than the 17mm). In terms of IQ, the 14-150mm II actually beats the 14-42mm II R; not sure about the 40-150mm, though, since I've never shot it. Around here, the E-M10 II is available with the 14-150mm II as a kit - a very sensible combo in my book, and one I'd choose over the E-M10 plus two standard zooms. Alas, as far as I recall, the E-M10 was never sold with this lens as a kit ...

    M.
     
  13. photoeagle

    photoeagle Mu-43 Regular

    65
    Apr 25, 2015
    Brad Harris
    I know when I shot film that a skylight filter was always needed. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.
     
  14. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    Shooting RAW allows you to get a high quality different exposure from the one you took in camera. For example you can fix an overexposed shot or correct the exposure of only parts of the shot, for example in a landscape you make the sky a little darker and the land brighter. You can also get better results with noise removal at high-iso with some PP work. One big difference is that you can fix white balance later with no quality loss. Some kind of photography benefits more from RAW then others.
    If you are generally happy with the exposure and WB you got in camera there is not much point to process the RAW to get a JPEG almost identical to the one that you got from the camera. You can do a lot processing with JPEGs too, but the more you stretch it the more it looses quality.

    I use good clear filters only on the most expensive lenses. For SD cards I prefer to buy the small ones, today I'd get a fast 16GB (sandisk or lexar). The reasoning is that in a year I can add another one, bigger, better for about the same price of the 16GB today.

    Another thing not mentioned is a tripod. Depending how much and for what you'd use it you can be good with a micro one (Ultrapod, Joby micro) or with a good travel one (MeFoto or Sirui for example). Tripod can get big, heavy and expensive very easily. You could also get a "throwaway" one, for $10/15, just to see if you need it, how often you are willing to bring it around, etc.

    Depending on how much you shot I'd recommend a couple of books on photography (or video courses), for example Understanding Exposure by Peterson and The Photographer's Eye by Freeman.
     
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  15. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Extra batteries, a better strap (that suits you).

    With Olympus, I'd first play with RAW using their free Olympus Viewer (OV3) software. It will give you an exact replica of the in camera photo to begin with, but with all the advantages of RAW (higher bit depth for adjustment, better shadow/highlight recovery, fine readjustment of noise, sharpening, tone curves etc).

    OV3 is a bit slow and doesn't allow localised adjustments. Once you get the hang of it and want to go further you might find other software that meets your needs better, but only OV3 will give you a RAW starting point that's identical to what you had in camera, so you'll need to do all your adjustments with that in mind.