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OMD banding with 12-50mm zoom!

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by vanessamphoto, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. vanessamphoto

    vanessamphoto Mu-43 Rookie

    11
    Jun 8, 2012
    Edited to remove question that was deemed too stupid for this forum.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    So now you've got a lens/camera combination that exhibits (to my eye fairly subtle) banding on severely underexposed shots?

    I don't really see that as a major affliction unless you can see evidence of similar banding in properly exposed shots.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. parka

    parka Mu-43 Regular

    88
    May 12, 2012
    I say it's from the sensor rather than the lens.

    It's easy to create banding with M43 sensors. Try shooting a page with pictures on a book. Move your camera in different angles to look for the banding.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. zapatista

    zapatista Mu-43 Top Veteran

    668
    Mar 19, 2012
    Denver, Colorado, USA
    Mike
    OMG, under exposed shots @6400 ISO might exhibit banding? My life is over.
     
  5. vanessamphoto

    vanessamphoto Mu-43 Rookie

    11
    Jun 8, 2012
    lol, yes, zapatista! Not sure I'll make it through the day knowing that I can't shoot underexposed shots without banding. :p

    Thanks for the helpful comment parka. I'm new to M43 and didn't know that banding was an easy thing to achieve with the sensors.

    DeeJayK - I agree.
     
  6. c_henry

    c_henry Mu-43 Regular

    65
    May 12, 2012
    If you're underexposing your shots by that amount at ISO6400 then the banding is the least of your worries (as you've probably been locked in a closet accidentally, check to see if you've got your phone and call for help). But it's hardly the sensor's/camera's fault.

    Now, if there's banding when the image is exposed 'properly' then yes, there's a problem.

    Colin
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. 250swb

    250swb Mu-43 Regular

    Most of us? I think most of us know not to under expose so much. It will cause banding with almost any digital camera. To compound your lack of knowledge you then try to blame it on the camera and start a panic! :rolleyes:

    Steve
     
  8. Livnius

    Livnius Super Moderator

    Jul 7, 2011
    Melbourne. Australia
    Joe
    The OP presented a problem and received a couple of fair responses....there's no need for the rest of the smart ar5e sarcasm.

    Please let us keep things civil and not resort to this sort of stuff....it'll go a long way in ensuring this forum remains the friendly place it always has been.
     
    • Like Like x 23
  9. EP1-GF1

    EP1-GF1 Mu-43 Veteran

    312
    Apr 12, 2011
    I, too, think it was a fair concern. After some of the outrageous banding problems on the Panasonic GH1 I think people are right to be wary.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. c_henry

    c_henry Mu-43 Regular

    65
    May 12, 2012
    I agree that banding could be a problem and people have a right to be concerned, but at normal ISO's and exposure. Under exposing by 3-4 stops at ISO 6400 then expecting to not see banding or an image that doesn't have some sort of problem is a fairly unrealistic (and unfair) test to put any camera through.

    I did try to make my reply partly humorous not to offend the OP and apologise if he was.

    Colin
     
    • Like Like x 3
  11. wolfie

    wolfie Mu-43 Regular

    107
    Apr 15, 2009
    Auckland, New Zealand
     
  12. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    I think every now and then sarcasm is the ONLY sane response. Someone on another forum compared this "flaw" to 'my car slides in corners at 100mph in the rain' - NOW WHAT!?!?!? Well, don't corner at 100mph in the rain! And don't shoot at 6400 in near total darkness, attempt to pull details out, and be shocked, SHOCKED!, that there's banding. Good heavens, I think there may be just a spot of noise in there too! Oh NOOOOO!!!

    Sorry Joe - I try to keep the sarcasm in check but every now and then the pressure is too great and some leaks out around the edges. This is one of those...

    -Ray
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. vanessamphoto

    vanessamphoto Mu-43 Rookie

    11
    Jun 8, 2012
    Ray, I'm really sorry my post caused you to experience said leakage. In the future I will be more cognizant of this issue and refrain from posting questions that leave you bursting at the seams.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  14. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    The GH1 displayed banding readily, even at low ISOs. This seems to be a very different situation. In fact, it's the first example I've seen that doesn't involve the 20/1.7, and it's at ISO 6400, a setting that is barely usable to begin with.

    DH
     
  15. Shade

    Shade Mu-43 Regular

    74
    May 30, 2012
    That is an extremely underexposed shot, banding is probably prone to exist anyway at that kind of picture. If it doesnt appear on properly exposed shots, then no worries mate..
     
  16. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    I'm sure you meant no harm, but my radar starts beeping a bit when someone with all of one or two previous posts here and on DPR raises this very serious concern, complete with exclamation points. When you push a camera to the point of doing something silly (like horribly underexposed shots at 6400 - one would think if you're shooting at 6400, you're going to pretty cognizant of exposure) and are shocked that it doesn't do it really well, I just have to wonder where this is coming from.

    If your intentions are pure and you were honestly shocked (!) at this slightly perceivable banding, I apologize for my sarcasm. But please forgive me for being skeptical of your motives under such circumstances.

    The example of 'my car skids when cornering at 100mph in the rain' was obviously hyperbole, but unfortunately not by all that much.

    -Ray
     
  17. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Nov 28, 2011
    Does it show banding in the same conditions at 3200 ISO?

    This could be a concern to people that shoot stuff like concert photography. If I were to shoot a concert with my OM-D I'm about to receive rather than my 5D MKII, I would probably have shots where areas of the photos were under exposed. With my 5D MKII I shoot at 3200-6400 ISO regularly when doing concerts.

    Shot at 4000 ISO:
    4366876676_2509aa3243_z.

    With images like the above, I'd have banding throughout the parts of the photo that aren't decently exposed if it's still doing it at slightly lower ISOs. That leave the OM-D out as a viable option for that type of photography. After all, not all venues have good lighting, even if the band is a national act.
     
  18. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Nov 28, 2011
    And while not all of us are doing 100mph in the rain, those that are would prefer not to use the car that does skid over the one that doesn't. We aren't all race car drivers here, but those of us that are would appreciate the tool for the job to work as well as it can in those conditions.
     
  19. c_henry

    c_henry Mu-43 Regular

    65
    May 12, 2012
    Went to your web site. Very nice! So please keep posting, I would love to see what you can really do with an OM-D.

    Colin
     
  20. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    OK, so to push the analogy, if you're the type who wants to take it to the limit in the rain, you probably wouldn't be doing it with OEM tires. This is about the 12-50 kit lens. Just seems rather silly to me.

    BUT, if we're going to treat this seriously,

    To the extent this is a question about the camera rather than the lens, I just went back and looked at some dead of night shots I took at ISO 6400 with the 12mm with something semi-bright in the foreground on which the exposure was based and then the dead of night emerging behind this primary subject/scene. These were jpegs, fwiw. I just went in and raised the shadows as far as I could in Aperture and, as expected the dark areas looked TERRIBLE when brought up a few stops - tons of noise and goofy color, etc. But no banding, none, not even subtle. So if there's a problem perhaps its a lens, but this just seems like something that should be a sensor issue. And I'm not finding it for whatever its worth. And I probably wouldn't be trying to shoot in near darkness at 6400 with the kit lens anyway - I'd be using something with a bit brighter aperture.

    -Ray
     
    • Like Like x 1