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OM-D, Panny 100-300 and Continuous Shooting Speed?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by newbert, Aug 1, 2013.

  1. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    Yesterday, I was shooting with my OM-D E-M5, using various lenses. At one point I had the camera set to High-speed Continuous shooting and I found that (using the exact same shutter speed, same aperture setting, same lighting conditions, same ISO and same memory card) the speed of the continuous shooting was noticably slower when using my Panasonic 100-300 lens than with my other lenses (such as the Oly 12-50 kit lens). :confused: IBIS was on in both cases and OIS was off on the Panny 100-300.

    It's hard to quantify how much slower, but I'd venture to say 25-30%. In other words it took 25-30% longer to fire off x number of images with the 100-300 lens than with the 12-50.

    Has anyone else noticed this? Is this behavior normal? :confused: I'm leaving on a long vacation trip in two weeks, and the Panny 100-300 works fine otherwise. I'm a bit worried that there's something wrong with it though, but I need it for my trip.

    Thanks!
     
  2. nsd20463

    nsd20463 Mu-43 Regular

    116
    Apr 30, 2011
    Santa Cruz, CA
    It should be straight forward to quantify. Take a stopwatch (your phone has one). Hold down the shutter for 10 seconds. See how many photos you've taken.

    (And if you have a slow card or small buffer, put the camera in jpeg only, normal compression first so the buffer doesn't limit you).
     
  3. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    Thanks for the suggestion -- but the main point I was trying to get across wasn't on how to quantify the difference in speed. It was whether or not there should be any difference in speed, given that all shooting parameters (other the lens) were the same.
     
  4. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    Some Panasonic lenses are extremely slow to step down their aperture blades. This was the main reason I sold my 20mm f/1.7. Panasonic 14mm is better in this respect but the lag is noticeable when comparing it to manual lenses or even to Olympus 45/1.8.

    Try comparing shot-to-shot times with the lens wide open and stepped down a bit.
     
  5. CaptZoom

    CaptZoom Mu-43 Regular

    48
    Apr 11, 2013
    Were the lenses set to manual focus?
     
  6. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    :confused: I assume you mean, was the camera set to MF with both lenses? If so, the answer is No. It was set to S-AF.
     
  7. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    292
    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    I noticed the difference in shot-to-shot time originally at f/8. I have not tried testing each lens at wide-open, as the wide-open aperture is different for each (and "wide open" changes depending on the focal length).

    Thanks.
     
  8. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
    In High Speed mode, there is not focusing after the first image.
     
  9. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
    Man I love this little camera! But I had to test this condition for myself.

    I compared the frame rate in "H" between the 12-35 and the 100-300. They performed the same for me. I didn't time them, but I got nine frames in each of three test sequences at just about 1 second per sequence. I tested the 12-35 once and then the 100-300 once at 100mm and again at 300mm. I know I set the 12-35 for f/2.8, but I don't recall what the 100-300 switched to after changing lenses (I assume wide open in both cases). ISO was set at 2000 for all sequences.
     
  10. CaptZoom

    CaptZoom Mu-43 Regular

    48
    Apr 11, 2013
    No. I was wondering if the lenses were set to auto or manual (assuming the lenses have that toggle). I though the different AF speeds may have to do with they delay, but apparently the lenses don't try to follow focus in the mode you mentioned.