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OM-D Exposure Question

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by csnoel, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. csnoel

    csnoel Mu-43 Rookie

    19
    Apr 21, 2012
    I must first start off by saying that I am relatively new to photography. I am spending what time I have to better understand how everything works and relates to each other.

    I took some shots outside yesterday and noticed when I imported them into Lightroom 4 I am noticing that the shots seem a little over exposed by .30 - .40. It was a sunny clear day and the sun was behind me.

    I know that I can make the adjustment on the exposure in the camera but is this typical if the camera is telling me that the exposure is correct?

    I hope this makes sense. :)

    Thanks
     
  2. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    Depends on the metering mode you selected. You should refer to page 47 in the manual, it shows examples and explains the metering modes.
     
  3. csnoel

    csnoel Mu-43 Rookie

    19
    Apr 21, 2012
    I believe that it was set to Digital ESP.
     
  4. Jman

    Jman Mu-43 Veteran

    475
    Apr 20, 2011
    Columbus, OH
    Your camera doesn't know what 'correct' exposure is. It meters to make the overall tonality of your image middle gray (at least, the area you're metering...if on evaluative, it'll be the whole image, if on spot, the area you meter). If you shoot lighter subjects, it will underexpose them (you need + exposure compensation). If you shoot dark subjects, it will overexpose them (you need - exposure compensation). After a while you will get a good idea about how much EC you need for a given scene given the scene's tonality.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. csnoel

    csnoel Mu-43 Rookie

    19
    Apr 21, 2012
    Thanks

    Thanks JMan. That helps me better understand. So much to learn. :)
     
  6. crsnydertx

    crsnydertx Mu-43 Top Veteran

    995
    Dec 31, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Chuck
    Based on your experience, you may want to dial in -1/3 or -2/3 stop of exposure compensation when taking photos in similar sunny, contrasty conditions. That will help preserve highlights (light tones) while possibly introducing some noise in the shadows (dark tones). Lightroom does a pretty good job on shadow noise; when highlights are totally blown, they're gone.
     
  7. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    In the Gears menu D there's an option called "Live View Boost". Make sure it's turned off and you'll be able to see the effect of exposure compensation on your image in the viewfinder/on the screen as you dial it in. Very handy. It allows you to see what adjusting your exposure will do to, and for, the image before you press the shutter.
     
  8. dre_tech

    dre_tech Mu-43 Veteran

    314
    Jan 31, 2012
    Yes, very important. I just turned this off today, had the camera for about 5 days now, hadn't really noticed it before. I just noticed that I was underexposing by half a stop when using highlight/shadow view. Luckily RAW saved the day.
     
  9. csnoel

    csnoel Mu-43 Rookie

    19
    Apr 21, 2012
    Is it turned on by default?
     
  10. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can't remember what the default is, which is why I said to make sure that it is turned off.
     
  11. crsnydertx

    crsnydertx Mu-43 Top Veteran

    995
    Dec 31, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Chuck
    Page 88 in manual for instructions.
     
  12. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    I've found that I fairly consistently need to dial out 1/3 EV on my Olympus cams in bright conditions, and I've actually set it in as a permanent exposure bias (separate from exposure comp) sometimes.
     
  13. M4/3

    M4/3 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    713
    Sep 24, 2011
    As a jpeg shooter I try to take multiple jpegs of the same scene using different exposure settings when possible. Helps improve the chances I'll get a jpeg with ideal exposure and focus. Also sometimes I'll take two photos with different white balance settings; i.e. custom white balance and automatic white balance.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. kenez

    kenez Mu-43 Regular

    125
    Apr 18, 2012
    On a related topic, I have noticed when using the EVF on my E-M5 that often what is displayed just prior to pressing the shutter is not an accurate representation of the actual output. I would have thought that the main advantage of an EVF would be to see an accurate preview of what the sensor is "seeing" and the output would be very similar. It seems to be more of a problem during bright outdoor conditions and when using some of the art filters. BTW, I am able to see the effects of adjusting exposure compensation in the EVF although at times it isn't particularly accurate either. Any thoughts? Thanks.
     
  15. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    Refer to your owners manual page 87 & 92 for adjusting brightness, WB and hue.
     
  16. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    Well, an optical viewfinder on a DSLR shows you what the sensor is "seeing", but it doesn't show you output which can be quite different from what the sensor sees, depending on how you expose and whether you're shooting RAW of JPEG in which case other settings play a part.

    On Olympus bodies with the Live View Boost setting, you have 2 choices: a bright image that doesn't change as you adjust exposure, and an image that does adjust as you change exposure but can therefore become decidedly dim at times. You get the choice.

    Then there's the option to adjust a number of other settings such as sharpness, contrast, saturation, and even a curves adjustment. All of these affect JPEG output and don't affect RAW output, but they also affect how the image looks on the screen or in the viewfinder. There's also brightness and colour settings for the viewfinder and screen. This second set of settings only affect the screen display, not any of your files.

    Depending on how you set all of those options, what you see in the viewfinder may or may not resemble your images to a greater or lesser degree. I shoot RAW but a couple of my settings, e.g. for sharpness and contrast, are there to make it easier for me to judge some things in the viewfinder and result in the viewfinder/screen display looking somewhat different to my images in some ways. but I'm aware of that and it is deliberate because it helps me when I'm composing shots.

    You've got a lot of flexibility in your options and some choices will make your viewfinder/screen look a lot more like what your photo is going to look like than others. The idea is to set it up the way it works for you. That need not be the way others have things set but you don't have to set it up the way others want to see things, and you don't have to have the display look like the photo if that doesn't work the best for you when you're composing your shots.
     
  17. kenez

    kenez Mu-43 Regular

    125
    Apr 18, 2012
    Yeah, I already did that (reduced the brightness, in particular) but that didn't solve the problem.