OM-D E-M5II Halfway Release With IBIS (Battery life)

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by AG_Alex2097, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. AG_Alex2097

    AG_Alex2097 Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Dec 18, 2015
    Alex S.
    Coming from Canon DSLR, i've noticed the rather drastic decrease in battery life on mirrorless systems, so i started fiddling with the settings to see where i could save some energy (what a journey it was haha :D )

    Going through it all, i ended up elongating battery life quite a bit (around 20-40% maybe (it's hard to say)), 1 major factor that increased it is the "Half way Release With IS" setting
    This basically disables image stabilisation when having the shutter button pressed halfway, which i don't really need at the focal lengths i shoot, but i am now wondering, does this take away from the IBIS' performance? As it has to stabilise rather rapidly, just before exposing the sensor. Something in my head tells me that having the sensor pre-stabilised would be better, but i'm not sure what to think of it

    Thx for any input!
    Alex
     
  2. heli-mech

    heli-mech Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Mar 9, 2012
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Andrew
    Actually some people have found the opposite and have found better IS performance with the halfway release off. Most popular theory is that with it on the sensor could theoretically be at or near one extreme of its range and when you go to actually take the shot it will not be able to compensate in that one particular direction. I personally haven't noticed much of a difference either way, but it wouldn't surprise me if with the setting off under a controlled test you would get more consistent IS performance. The downside of course is you loose the stabilized viewfinder which is nice for telephoto or macro work.
     
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  3. AG_Alex2097

    AG_Alex2097 Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Dec 18, 2015
    Alex S.
    Interesting, i never looked at it that way, but that does make sense, I rarely shoot at focal lengths of 100mm or above, so not having a stabilised viewfinder image doesn't bother me too much ^^
    thanks for the info! :)
     
  4. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I certainly appreciate it being on with telephoto lenses for birds etc.
     
  5. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    I'm surprised that it improves battery life TBH. IBIS can never really be off since even if not actively moving the sensor, it still has to suspend it - if you turn off the camera you'll see the sensor assembly drop to the bottom.
     
  6. AG_Alex2097

    AG_Alex2097 Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Dec 18, 2015
    Alex S.
    I think it's due to 1) the gyros continuously being monitored for movement, 2) the continuous calculations being made for the proper compensation & 3) the continuous adjustments to the electromagnets to apply those compensations, that last one is probably what consumes most energy, but i'm no expert, so don't take my words for it

    I also fiddled with a lot of other settings (EVF & display brightness, disabled the eye sensor (manual switching between EVF & LCD), backlit LCD & sleep at minimum time, life view boost (off), disabled "beep", shading compensation (off), quick sleep (on), mostly MF instead of AF (peaking makes MF really enjoyable), AF illumination (off) (i have a custom low light "MySet" that has it in case needed), noise reduction off (except in the custom low light Myset), resetting the lens (off)

    But, the halfway release IS is what, to me personally, was most noticeable (i had it on in the past (after all the changes), but then was searching for something in the settings, came across it and turned it off and have since noticed another positive change in battery life)

    @Ross the fiddler@Ross the fiddler i do too, but i don't usually shoot at such focal lengths, a custom MySet with it turned on could be interesting though :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2016
  7. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    I've read that disabling the touchscreen also helps and you can set the camera to go in review mode in the EVF, in this way the LCD never turns on unless you switch with the button. I did not try so I cannot confirm. Shutter release short (not the default) is another battery drain.
     
  8. AG_Alex2097

    AG_Alex2097 Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Dec 18, 2015
    Alex S.
    Correct, review works in EVF ;) Although it is a bit small to properly review your pictures, but if you have the advanced image info enabled, you can easily check the graphs for blown out highlights or underexposure, just the focus is hard to spot (unless you used auto focus, in which case it should indicate the point of focus), i have image review turned off alltogether though, i use the test picture function button instead (which remains on screen regardless if you have review on or off)

    And i forgot about the touchscreen, that one's disabled as well here :p

    Oh!! And Wi-Fi!! Nearly forgot that one as well, also turned off

    Edit: doing some more searching of the web, it seems someone has already done an extensive test here (although an E-M10): Olympus Battery Life, Measured: Micro Four Thirds Talk Forum: Digital Photography Review
    Which is quite interesting, it confirms what pdk42 said and declares me crazy :D
    Seems like manual focussing might also be worse than AF since you manually focusing probably takes longer than the camera auto focussing
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2016
  9. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I guess that with having the second battery in the grip I'm more concerned with being able to use all the features I want that are available than how quickly I would drain the battery. When the first battery dies it is in the battery grip (E-M5 & E-M1 being set that way by default) & that can be changed at any time before the camera body battery dies with a spare 3rd or 4th battery & with it being changed before the body battery runs out it means I can take many photos without being concerned as to what might drain them quicker. I remember years ago in visiting my wife's uncle we entered a darkened house to find him sitting in the lounge room covered with a blanket in his chair with no light on & no heating, just because he was saving electricity, even though he could afford it. I don't want to be like that with my camera. ;)

    OK, maybe I'm being a little harsh & please don't let my ramblings upset you but I just like to be careful when I need to & enjoy what I am blessed to have when I can. :)
     
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  10. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    I often have the LCD facing inward on my EM5 II. Unfortunately, I used it for the "Singles in January" challenge over on the Photographer's Lounge forum and It's hard to gauge battery life stretched over a few weeks. I'll try the OP's suggestion and see how it goes.
     
  11. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    Personally I'm not concerned with battery life if it requires me disabling features of the camera that could make my shooting easier or helps me in some way. I just carry plenty of spare batteries but have never needed more then 4 batteries (6 counting the two in camera to start)
     
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  12. AG_Alex2097

    AG_Alex2097 Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Dec 18, 2015
    Alex S.
    @drd1135@drd1135 you might not want to bother with that, couple posts above you i mentioned a link to some research that disputes my observation, battery savings are mostly in turning the device off instead of sleep mode, and minimising focussing time, having wi-fi turned off, dimming the lcd brightness and as a side note, the battery grip is less efficient with power than the internal battery compartment

    @Ross the fiddler@Ross the fiddler & @Phocal@Phocal I completely understand what you mean, but just knowing where power is being drawn most seems like a good thing to know so you could potentially adjust your shooting style to save some energy here and there, allowing you to shoot longer, but not at the expense of comfort, it also seems i was wrong about IS consuming lots of battery, so it doesn't matter too much with regards to the original topic (which wasn't really about battery life to begin with, but performance of pre-shutter IS :p )
     
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  13. I disabled this feature for the following reason; if you focus your shot, recompose and get everything level, the sensor will have rotated independently of the camera body. Then, when you activate the shutter the sensor zeroes itself before the shutter releases, resulting in a crooked image that needs to be corrected and therefore also cropped. This is the biggest drawback I have found with IS at corrects for rotation, but it ceases to be a problem if Halfway Release with IS is disabled. If you always focus and release the shutter in one quick motion then Halfway Release with IS can be left turned on.
     
  14. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    That's just it, I don't want to adjust my shooting style to save battery power. I typically carry 10 batteries (including the two in the camera) when I head out. Never really used more then 5, but like to be safe (especially when it's cold which kills the batteries).

    Actually my shooting style is what drains my battery. Watching a bird thru the camera constantly as it hunts and waiting for that perfect moment is what kills my battery. When I'm set up on a bird that is actively hunting my camera is pretty much on the entire time, which can be 1-3 hours.

    Batteries are cheap, light, and take up little room in my backpack.
     
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