1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

OM-D E-M5 video

Discussion in 'Video to Share' started by Terri, Jun 20, 2012.

  1. Terri

    Terri Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Mar 4, 2012
    I recently purchased an OM-D E-M5. I am a total amateur at shooting video but I gave it a try. I used my 45 f1.8 lens for this shoot. I tried different methods of focusing. I think continuous turned out the worst. Trying to video 5 busy kids with a shallow DOF is a real challenge. If any of you have suggestions on techniques I would love to hear them.

    Here is my result.

    https://vimeo.com/44384935
     
  2. dagaleaa

    dagaleaa Mu-43 Veteran

    252
    Jun 4, 2011
    Naples, Fl
    Dawn
    Wonderful video....isn't it so much fun! All of your grandchildren are so beautiful. I have an OM-D too, but have not experimented with the video yet. I also have a Panasonic GH2 and have experimented with it!! Here is a small video I did of my granddaughter Phebe for her first birthday in May of this year!
    <iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/41798562" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/41798562">Happy Birthday to Phebe!!!</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/dawnh">Dawn Harviel</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>
     
  3. Livnius

    Livnius Super Moderator

    Jul 7, 2011
    Melbourne. Australia
    Joe
    Hi Terri.

    I don't shoot all that much video myself so I am sure there will be others here who may have more to offer, but in my experience shooting video with the GF1, GX1 and now the EM5 is that the various AF modes are a little unreliable on all of them. Even when the AF locks onto the subject I want...it'll at times wonder off, even if only momentarily, and I find the result a little distracting.

    I've found that manual focus delivers a better result. It takes a little getting used to I suppose so that when you move from one subject to the other you instinctively turn the focus ring in the correct direction and amount. It's great too because you can control how quickly or slowly you transition from one subject to the next.
    Although I suspect you may already know this I'll add it anyway, a good strong ND filter is a must in daylight to help slow the shutter speed and achieve an even smoother look.

    Have my fingers crossed that at some point Olympus give us a firmware upgrade allowing video IBIS when using adapted lenses.
     
  4. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    Sometimes manual focus is by far the easiest option. And not shooting wide open when it's not necessary.
     
  5. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    I always enter theses threads with trepidation

    but in this case this was pretty damn good... just two suggestions

    1) look into getting a monopod....cuts out a lot of the jerkiness and isn't as restrictive as a tripod

    2) edit out the bad bits...out of focus and jerkiness... be ruthless on editing... most hollywood movies use less than 10% of what they shoot

    or an maybe a third... try some cross dissolves... combined with shorter shot lengths

    cheers

    K
     
  6. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    Nice first effort using video. I appreciate that each cut didn't have some sort of annoying dissolve or wipe. I also appreciated the use of slo-mo replay. The music was distracting -- I felt like I was trapped in a 16-bit video game. You might try using manual focus to eliminate the focus hunting, but I realize that's easier said than done with such fast moving subjects.

    Of course, your subjects were superstars. Thanks for sharing.
     
  7. Terri

    Terri Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Mar 4, 2012
    Your granddaughter is adorable and her video is fun. Thanks so much.
     
  8. Terri

    Terri Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Mar 4, 2012
    Yes, being able to turn the focus ring the right way instinctively will take some practice. I guess I need to practice on some stationary objects first. What strength of ND filter would you recommend? I didn't know that was something I would need, so thank you for the suggestion.
     
  9. Terri

    Terri Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Mar 4, 2012
    I guess I better practice with the manual focusing. Thanks.
     
  10. Terri

    Terri Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Mar 4, 2012
    Thank you for the very practical suggestions.
     
  11. Terri

    Terri Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Mar 4, 2012
    Thank you for watching my show...I agree that the music isn't the best. I've got to find some good low cost or free royalty free music. Do you have any suggestions? Glad you liked my subjects. I appreciate that you liked parts of my show. I realize that I have a lot to learn. I'm a much better photographer than videographer.
     
  12. Livnius

    Livnius Super Moderator

    Jul 7, 2011
    Melbourne. Australia
    Joe
    Hi Terri.

    Shooting at night or in low light situations you more than likely won't need an ND filter, but in order to try maintain slower shutter speeds (ie....smoother video image and shallow DOF effect) you need to try and block out some of that strong light hitting the sensor otherwise your camera is going to want to use high shutter speeds...not usually the nicest video to view as it can appear a little jittery.

    Now there are relatively precise calculations based on tried and tested frame rates,shutter speeds etc that would dictate exactly what strength of filter would be required for a given lighting situation, but that for me and for the type of relatively casual video shooting that I do is frankly a little too much, my videos are mostly off the cuff type captures that I put together with a little soundtrack music and it's job done. On a trip away with friends I may shoot a couple of videos for every 100 still images.

    I just use any one of the filters I keep in my bag for my regular stills photography...B+W 2 or 3 stop filter depending on whether its overcast and cloudy or quite bright. The IDEAL solution is to spend a little more money ($130+) on a good quality variable ND filter and have it all from 1 to 10 stop for example in the one tidy unit.....probably cheaper than having several filters anyway, and that way you can really hone in on the prefect amount of light blocking. But like I said, I'm only a casual video shooter so I'm happy to keep it simple and to put on a 3 stop filter (mostly) knowing that it alone although perhaps not perfect, will certainly will help make my video appear smoother.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Terri

    Terri Mu-43 Regular

    157
    Mar 4, 2012
    Thanks so much for your advice. I will certainly look into getting a filter.
     
  14. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    Yeah, finding good free music is a challenge. I sometimes find myself finding appropriate music for a video than I do actually cutting the video together. Here's one site I like to use which has some nice search features.

    After seeing some of your photographs you've shared, you may need to go to film school to approach that quality with video. :wink: I love to see folks get outside their comfort zone.