Olympus - the rebirth :)

ashburtononline

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Small point and shoot cameras are DEAD. Cellphones have seen to that. Get rid of them. The target audience for any camera manufacturer is enthusiasts and professionals. Not all professionals are equal so lets split that group into Pro - and Pro + (the really successful ones). IF Olympus wanted to survive then the toy cameras need to be axed immediately, I'd scrap the EM10 line too. As much as I HATE to say it, the X line goes as well..

This leaves the EM5 and EM1 (only Mk3) to feed the correct target audience. This would streamline operations and save money. Too many different grips, battery types etc ... Things MUST be standardised. What was wrong with the older flashes ... FL50's etc ? They work great. Olympus management made some shocking decisions and adopted a completely wrong strategy. This has shafted us!
 

Aristophanes

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Small point and shoot cameras are DEAD. Cellphones have seen to that. Get rid of them. The target audience for any camera manufacturer is enthusiasts and professionals. Not all professionals are equal so lets split that group into Pro - and Pro + (the really successful ones). IF Olympus wanted to survive then the toy cameras need to be axed immediately, I'd scrap the EM10 line too. As much as I HATE to say it, the X line goes as well..

This leaves the EM5 and EM1 (only Mk3) to feed the correct target audience. This would streamline operations and save money. Too many different grips, battery types etc ... Things MUST be standardised. What was wrong with the older flashes ... FL50's etc ? They work great. Olympus management made some shocking decisions and adopted a completely wrong strategy. This has shafted us!
I predict they will merge the EM10 with EM5, but if they intend to keep the 150-400/4.5 release, they will require the EM1X. What they could do is rationalize the EM1.3 with no grip. It’s very difficult on the mount and screw to extensively use an add-on grip with long, heavy glass like the 40-150/2.8 with TC and the 300/4. The EM1X would have to be invented if they are able to continue that long glass system.

One of the great things about Olympus is they offer a compete system, like Bodycap FE 9mm lens, EE dot sight, macro flash, the TG system including dive housing (which I’ve seen used in Cuba), backpacks, grips, etc. Sadly, much of that may be cut, left to the third party market better able to gauge demand rather than leave NewCo with unsold inventory. Example:

https://www.krakensports.ca/product/olympus-tg6-waterproof-housing/?v=e4b09f3f8402
 

Paul C

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Oct 29, 2017
Messages
155
What can JIP do to make a change --- and by inference, what can the M4/3 format do to make a change to make themselves relevant to the creative photographer of 2020?

Professionals are a limited market - so to guarantee survival the traditional method has been to offer affordable entry mass market models - they can then work as a stepping stone to a more and more absorbing hobby - with a greater investment!

The problem with much of the M4/3 system has been that Olympus and Panasonic kept M4/3 as a niche market for which it is difficult for amateurs to break out of the basic "2 x Kit zoom lens" packages without paying an arm and a leg - and as the news tells us - that has cost Olympus its camera division in 2020 !

The DXO review of the Lumix "kit zoom" options tells it as it is:
Screen Shot 2020-06-29 at 10.40.58.png
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

and even $549 USD for the Olymous 75-300mm "superzoom" couldn't buy you a bright, sharp picture !
Screen Shot 2020-06-29 at 10.52.07.png
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


While the designers used multiple lens elements to create low distortion lenses - they paid the price in poor transmission and low resolution which the step up from the first-generation 12MP sensors has exposed ruthlessly. Just take a look at what Olympus put into the 75-300mm: 18 elements in 13 groups, including 2 ED, 1 Super ED, and 3 HR elements !

If you progress from snaps to serious creative amateur photography then we know that sensor improvements mean nothing if the lenses aren't equal to the new resolutions. So if zoom lenses are not the answers, where were the "affordable primes?".

The problem has been that the only solutions in term of prime lenses in the 100 - 200mm range have been very big items labelled as "Pro-Lenses" and priced as such. Yet we know that moderate telephoto lenses have traditionally been amongst the highest resolution lenses made by most camera companies. Even with very simple and off-patent designs in the 1980s you could buy high resolution inexpensive telephotos from Vivitar, Tamron, Tokina, Sigma, et al.

Today, Yi manage to sell a 42.5mm F1.8 AF lens in M4/3 mount online for <$50 USD - and as both the MU43 reviews of that lens and I will confirm - the IQ is excellent and way above the abilities of the "kit zoom" range of either Lumix or Zuiko.

Olympus had the solution on a plate with the chance to update their back catalogue of OM lenses to M4/3 format as affordable primes and lost it:

Look, for example at the OM 100mm F2.8 which would have made a great lightweight telephoto prime for keen amateurs:
Diameter 60 mm
Length 50 mm
Filter Thread 49 mm
Weight 230 g - even when made of 1980s metal !
Elements/ Groups 5/5
With a modern polycarbonate lens body and high refraction glass it could have been even smaller and lighter. The penalty would have been slightly more CA - but with a good JPEG correction algorithm or post-processing this is no issue to correct today.

The old OM 200mm F4 lens, in M4/3 a 400mm equivalent, could have been the ideal entry lens for amateur wildlife photographers. Again this in its F4.0 form was a simple design with just 5/4 elements/groups needed to deliver the picture. In its OM metal body it was only 0.5kg - so by using modern plastics, even with a fast AF motor and a tripod mount attachement added, this could have been another lightweight high-resolution model and a fantastic reason for amateurs to buy into the whole Panasonic/Olympus M4/3 system.

Screen Shot 2020-06-29 at 11.15.59.png
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Olympus managed this "stepping stone" market much better in the 1980s film-era. - for every "prime pro lens" in the 28-200mm range there was an excellent resolution and affordable amateur version.

If manufacturing "off-site" can deliver an optically excellent 42.5mm F1.8 AF M4/3 lens with 6 elements and autofocus from Yi at <$50, then the path to affordable prime lenses is clear to us all. How many of us committed enough to sign up to a web-forum such as MU43 would be interested in a 100mm or 200mm AF prime for M4/3 at a similar price point?


Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

PS - this 42.5mm Yi prime lens is not just very good for its price - it is actually very good at any price and weighs only 100g.

So as yet more MP added to each new generation sensor just shows up the optical limits of the affordable lens ranges - can I suggest that JIP goes "back to the future?"and looks that the back-catalogue of designs they have inherited. It will affect their "pro-spec" sales little, but might restore M43 as a format that can let amateurs "grow" within in the years ahead.
 
Last edited:

RS86

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The DXO review of the Lumix "kit zoom" options tells it as it is:

and even $549 USD for the Olymous 75-300mm "superzoom" couldn't buy you a bright, sharp picture !

View attachment 832592

While the designers used multiple lens elements to create low distortion lenses - they paid the price in poor transmission and low resolution which the step up from the first-generation 12MP sensors has exposed ruthlessly. Just take a look at what Olympus put into the 75-300mm: 18 elements in 13 groups, including 2 ED, 1 Super ED, and 3 HR elements !

If you progress from snaps to serious creative amateur photography then we know that sensor improvements mean nothing if the lenses aren't equal to the new resolutions. So if zoom lenses are not the answers, where were the "affordable primes?".

The problem has been that the only solutions in term of prime lenses in the 100 - 200mm range have been very big items labelled as "Pro-Lenses" and priced as such. Yet we know that moderate telephoto lenses have traditionally been amongst the highest resolution lenses made by most camera companies. Even with very simple and off-patent designs in the 1980s you could buy high resolution inexpensive telephotos from Vivitar, Tamron, Tokina, Sigma, et al.

Today, Yi manage to sell a 42.5mm F1.8 AF lens in M4/3 mount online for <$50 USD - and as both the MU43 reviews of that lens and I will confirm - the IQ is excellent and way above the abilities of the "kit zoom" range of either Lumix or Zuiko.

Olympus had the solution on a plate with the chance to update their back catalogue of OM lenses to M4/3 format as affordable primes and lost it:

Look, for example at the OM 100mm F2.8 which would have made a great lightweight telephoto prime for keen amateurs:
Diameter 60 mm
Length 50 mm
Filter Thread 49 mm
Weight 230 g - even when made of 1980s metal !
Elements/ Groups 5/5
With a modern polycarbonate lens body and high refraction glass it could have been even smaller and lighter. The penalty would have been slightly more CA - but with a good JPEG correction algorithm or post-processing this is no issue to correct today.

The old OM 200mm F4 lens, in M4/3 a 400mm equivalent, could have been the ideal entry lens for amateur wildlife photographers. Again this in its F4.0 form was a simple design with just 5/4 elements/groups needed to deliver the picture. In its OM metal body it was only 0.5kg - so by using modern plastics, even with a fast AF motor and a tripod mount attachement added, this could have been another lightweight high-resolution model and a fantastic reason for amateurs to buy into the whole Panasonic/Olympus M4/3 system.

View attachment 832599

Olympus managed this "stepping stone" market much better in the 1980s film-era. - for every "prime pro lens" in the 28-200mm range there was an excellent resolution and affordable amateur version.

If manufacturing "off-site" can deliver an optically excellent 42.5mm F1.8 AF M4/3 lens with 6 elements and autofocus from Yi at <$50, then the path to affordable prime lenses is clear to us all. How many of us committed enough to sign up to a web-forum such as MU43 would be interested in a 100mm or 200mm AF prime for M4/3 at a similar price point?


View attachment 832603
PS - this 42.5mm Yi prime lens is not just very good for its price - it is actually very good at any price and weighs only 100g.

So as yet more MP added to each new generation sensor just shows up the optical limits of the affordable lens ranges - can I suggest that JIP goes "back to the future?"and looks that the back-catalogue of designs they have inherited. It will affect their "pro-spec" sales little, but might restore M43 as a format that can let amateurs "grow" within in the years ahead.
Are you sure the 75-300mm can't take sharp images? Do you understand the compromises with small design and affordable price?

Btw. If you put the lens on E-M1 II, the sharpness goes from 5MP->7MP. Also if you put Olympus 45mm f/1.8 on E-M1 it says 9MP, and on E-M1 II it says 11MP. With PL 42.5mm it is 12MP vs 16MP. So according to this logic even the PL doesn't resolve the 20MP sensor (and it is the sharpest lens they have tested thus far), but I think someone who knows more could explain if there is something more we have to consider.

My girlfriend got Olympus 45mm f/1.8 from Olympus Finland last year, for 115 € new. I certainly would buy that rather than some Yi for any price (that I can't even find proper review of).

Here is an 100% zoomed example of 75-300mm shot at 300mm, EXIF is on the right of the screenshot. It is certainly sharp enough for me for a compact long-tele lens for which I paid 475 € new, in 2017. Of course different people have different requirements, but for sure there aren't many better alternatives for this price and size in the market.

Can you give some example for alternatives (in any system) as you critique it? How could they make it better exactly? Or something like the excellent and affordable 45mm f/1.8 which certainly is a better lens than the Yi one?

Screen Shot 06-29-20 at 01.55 PM 75-300mm.PNG
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
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exakta

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I suspect their biggest sellers are the E-PL and E-M10 lines - remember the Japanese market is by far their biggest and these cameras are its rump.
I have to agree. The E-M10 is one of the great bargains out there. All three versions have routinely gone on sale at $500 with a 14-42 lens and $600 with both the 14-42 and the 40-150R. That's right at the sweet spot of Canikon entry level DSLRs.
 

Erich_H

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.....
Do you understand the compromises with small design and affordable price?
.....
My girlfriend got Olympus 45mm f/1.8 from Olympus Finland last year, for 115 € new. I certainly would buy that rather than some Yi for any price (that I can't even find proper review of).
.....
Can you give some example for alternatives (in any system) as you critique it? How could they make it better exactly? Or something like the excellent and affordable 45mm f/1.8 which certainly is a better lens than the Yi one?
.....
The original list prices of the lenses in question:

Olympus 45 mm approximately US$ 300:-
XiaoYi 42.5 mm approximately US$ 100:-

For three times the price the Olympus should be better, or something is wrong in the world, considering the compromises you mentioned.

The current price of US$ 40:- for the XiaoYi is the fire sale, everything must go, price, after the closing of the YI M4/3 camera project.

I will not mention Olympus and fire sale in the same sentence.
 

Aristophanes

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I have to agree. The E-M10 is one of the great bargains out there. All three versions have routinely gone on sale at $500 with a 14-42 lens and $600 with both the 14-42 and the 40-150R. That's right at the sweet spot of Canikon entry level DSLRs.
It‘s also the sweet spot for the Canon M series, which is the top mirrorless seller worldwide with much faster AF than Olympus. Fewer lenses, but it‘s not sure that this category upgrades lenses much anyway.

Canon’s made very sure that one can buy into an APS-C system at $400-$700, and then buy into FF at $1,000. Sony, too. Nikon not far behind. They are designing their product tiers with little to no overlap based on sensor size (D500 excepted).

With Olympus you don’t make a sensor jump as you go up the price tier. Sensor level IQ is replaced by in-camera stuff. Then you get to body party at the $1,500 range where the EM1.3 is $50 more than the Nikon Z6.

This is the source of the Olympus failure. The actual gap between the EM10 and EM1.3 is not $1,000, but maybe $600. Maybe. And this is especially true if there is only one 20MP m43 sensor available.

You don’t have to look any further than Panasonic introducing FF mirrorless who pretty much said just that at their introduction. Higher price points require bigger sensors. This likely why the Panasonic G9 is much cheaper than the EM1.3. Panny figured this out. Olympus did not. The alarm bells were likely ringing when the EM1.2 was released at $1999 with the “over-engineered” bragging. Investors and reviewers slammed the price point and within 2 weeks it was dropped $200. The market was already in a downturn. Management then doubled down with the EM1X. Their arrogance has been replaced by JIP and activist investors at the Board table.

This puts Olympus/JIP in a problem space of either massively reducing EM1 series costs and prices, or eliminating the line altogether. And they’d still have to reduce the EM5.3 from its current $1,000 (on sale!) price point as it is now intruding into FF space.

But if Olympus/JIP eliminates its Pro offerings, all of this goes away...

https://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/development-announcements

...and the NewCo entity will only have what we currently see below that series, where margins and profits are pretty much non-existent. Canon and Sony have both readily admitted they make profit off their bigger formats, and lose buckets on the lower-end. The closer a supplier gets to smartphone prices and sensor size, the worse it is. I cannot see NewCo and the m43 mount surviving with product diversity limited to EPL, EM10, and a trimmed down, less tech EM5 (basically a WR EM10), the TG series, and only consumer grade glass. Only the lower half of the lens roadmap would survive, so maybe 3-4 “splash proof” lenses. The entire m43 system is just a smaller sensor version of the Canon M series, put there by Canon and the other FF manufacturers.
 

Mack

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Zuiko means "Light of the Gods" in Japanese so maybe the Bell & Howell flashlight idea is a good fit for the new Zuiko JIP outfit. You know, those "Taclights" Bell & Howell sells on TV and Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Bell-Howell-1176-High-Powered-Flashlight/dp/B01GSCMZTW

Could get into competition with the Bell & Howell "Tacglasses" too. https://www.amazon.com/Bell-Howell-...074SZGW7T/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8 After all, Nikon got into the eye wear craze in case their camera division goes belly up: https://www.nikonlenswear.com/

Perhaps the Bell & Howell hearing aid idea too: https://www.amazon.com/Bell-Howell-7912-Sonic-Earz/dp/B000O3T6HG Opps! They quit making those. Too many ear-buds came out via Apple and Samsung.

Time to go wax my old Saturn I can't get parts for. Still runs...sort of...aside from the smoke. Duct tape on plastic bumper adds some class to it.

:hiding:
 
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RS86

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It‘s also the sweet spot for the Canon M series, which is the top mirrorless seller worldwide with much faster AF than Olympus. Fewer lenses, but it‘s not sure that this category upgrades lenses much anyway.

...

The entire m43 system is just a smaller sensor version of the Canon M series, put there by Canon and the other FF manufacturers.
What do you mean with "not sure this category upgrades lenses much anyway"?

And what do you mean "entire m43 system is just a smaller sensor version of Canon M"? It might be one day when they build a "system" around it, which for example means great lens line-up.

If you look at Sony APS-C I think they have similar problem for lens line-up, because they focus much more on FF.

"Rumors also suggest that we’ll see several new EF-M lenses debut before the year is out, which is a welcome development given the relative scantiness of the EOS M lens lineup."

https://digital-photography-school.com/new-eos-m-cameras/
 

pdk42

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What can JIP do to make a change --- and by inference, what can the M4/3 format do to make a change to make themselves relevant to the creative photographer of 2020?

Professionals are a limited market - so to guarantee survival the traditional method has been to offer affordable entry mass market models - they can then work as a stepping stone to a more and more absorbing hobby - with a greater investment!

The problem with much of the M4/3 system has been that Olympus and Panasonic kept M4/3 as a niche market for which it is difficult for amateurs to break out of the basic "2 x Kit zoom lens" packages without paying an arm and a leg - and as the news tells us - that has cost Olympus its camera division in 2020 !

The DXO review of the Lumix "kit zoom" options tells it as it is:
View attachment 832591
and even $549 USD for the Olymous 75-300mm "superzoom" couldn't buy you a bright, sharp picture !
View attachment 832592

While the designers used multiple lens elements to create low distortion lenses - they paid the price in poor transmission and low resolution which the step up from the first-generation 12MP sensors has exposed ruthlessly. Just take a look at what Olympus put into the 75-300mm: 18 elements in 13 groups, including 2 ED, 1 Super ED, and 3 HR elements !

If you progress from snaps to serious creative amateur photography then we know that sensor improvements mean nothing if the lenses aren't equal to the new resolutions. So if zoom lenses are not the answers, where were the "affordable primes?".

The problem has been that the only solutions in term of prime lenses in the 100 - 200mm range have been very big items labelled as "Pro-Lenses" and priced as such. Yet we know that moderate telephoto lenses have traditionally been amongst the highest resolution lenses made by most camera companies. Even with very simple and off-patent designs in the 1980s you could buy high resolution inexpensive telephotos from Vivitar, Tamron, Tokina, Sigma, et al.

Today, Yi manage to sell a 42.5mm F1.8 AF lens in M4/3 mount online for <$50 USD - and as both the MU43 reviews of that lens and I will confirm - the IQ is excellent and way above the abilities of the "kit zoom" range of either Lumix or Zuiko.

Olympus had the solution on a plate with the chance to update their back catalogue of OM lenses to M4/3 format as affordable primes and lost it:

Look, for example at the OM 100mm F2.8 which would have made a great lightweight telephoto prime for keen amateurs:
Diameter 60 mm
Length 50 mm
Filter Thread 49 mm
Weight 230 g - even when made of 1980s metal !
Elements/ Groups 5/5
With a modern polycarbonate lens body and high refraction glass it could have been even smaller and lighter. The penalty would have been slightly more CA - but with a good JPEG correction algorithm or post-processing this is no issue to correct today.

The old OM 200mm F4 lens, in M4/3 a 400mm equivalent, could have been the ideal entry lens for amateur wildlife photographers. Again this in its F4.0 form was a simple design with just 5/4 elements/groups needed to deliver the picture. In its OM metal body it was only 0.5kg - so by using modern plastics, even with a fast AF motor and a tripod mount attachement added, this could have been another lightweight high-resolution model and a fantastic reason for amateurs to buy into the whole Panasonic/Olympus M4/3 system.

View attachment 832599

Olympus managed this "stepping stone" market much better in the 1980s film-era. - for every "prime pro lens" in the 28-200mm range there was an excellent resolution and affordable amateur version.

If manufacturing "off-site" can deliver an optically excellent 42.5mm F1.8 AF M4/3 lens with 6 elements and autofocus from Yi at <$50, then the path to affordable prime lenses is clear to us all. How many of us committed enough to sign up to a web-forum such as MU43 would be interested in a 100mm or 200mm AF prime for M4/3 at a similar price point?


View attachment 832603
PS - this 42.5mm Yi prime lens is not just very good for its price - it is actually very good at any price and weighs only 100g.

So as yet more MP added to each new generation sensor just shows up the optical limits of the affordable lens ranges - can I suggest that JIP goes "back to the future?"and looks that the back-catalogue of designs they have inherited. It will affect their "pro-spec" sales little, but might restore M43 as a format that can let amateurs "grow" within in the years ahead.
Hmm - not sure what point you're trying to prove here. Here's my take:

- In declining markets in general, the middle is always the worst impacted. The bottom goes cheaper (or changes), and the top goes specialised and higher price.

- In the camera world, the bottom has already been killed by increasingly sophisticated smartphones. The bottom has gone and it's fatally undermined many of the camera companies' business models.

- Cameras like the E-M10 line and the sort of lenses you mention are classic middle market. Not only is it under pressure, but it's also very tight margins. There's really not much future in it.

Given all this, Olympus (correctly in my view) identified the need to go up-market. However, the problem Olympus has is the sensor size. It's really tough, as we know, to convince people that an E-M1iii is worth more than a Sony A7iii simply because it's got a smaller sensor. Of course, the cognoscenti know that sensor size isn't everything and in fact the camera and its lens range are at least as important. The cost of designing and manufacturing an E-M1iii is surely no different to an A7iii, but everyone expects the Oly to be cheaper. In essence, the E-M1iii has been relegated to "mid tier" but with a high-end price tag. Bad news! Olympus should have done what Panasonic did and designed an FF camera, keeping m43 for the mid-tier.
 
Last edited:

Aristophanes

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What do you mean with "not sure this category upgrades lenses much anyway"?

And what do you mean "entire m43 system is just a smaller sensor version of Canon M"? It might be one day when they build a "system" around it, which for example means great lens line-up.

If you look at Sony APS-C I think they have similar problem for lens line-up, because they focus much more on FF.

"Rumors also suggest that we’ll see several new EF-M lenses debut before the year is out, which is a welcome development given the relative scantiness of the EOS M lens lineup."

https://digital-photography-school.com/new-eos-m-cameras/
EOS M outsells all other mirrorless formats...with a limited lens line-up.
Proving you don’t need the extent of the Olympus system to move units and get more customers.
The data suggests a manufacturer doesn’t require the breadth of the lens line-up to stay in biz.
It’s Olympus losing the most $ and in financial and management crisis. Not Panasonic with fewer lenses. Not Sony with fewer lenses. Not Canon with fewer lenses. Fuji, too.
What you assume as a positive may actually be a cost centre liability contributing to Olympus’s poor performance.
FF is where the profits are, and at least more forgiving margins in a declining aggregate market. Panasonic went FF precisely because of that.
 

RS86

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EOS M outsells all other mirrorless formats...with a limited lens line-up.
Proving you don’t need the extent of the Olympus system to move units and get more customers.
The data suggests a manufacturer doesn’t require the breadth of the lens line-up to stay in biz.
It’s Olympus losing the most $ and in financial and management crisis. Not Panasonic with fewer lenses. Not Sony with fewer lenses. Not Canon with fewer lenses. Fuji, too.
What you assume as a positive may actually be a cost centre liability contributing to Olympus’s poor performance.
FF is where the profits are, and at least more forgiving margins in a declining aggregate market. Panasonic went FF precisely because of that.
Great lens line-up is now a liability? :) Wonder why Canon is planning to release more lenses for M after so much time then. They must be stupid.

I have seen speculation if Canon might drop the M-line, because of so little support in lenses for that system. But this year they seem to focus on it.

One part why it probably sells so much that you can adapt older Canon lenses (people have these from DSLR days) on it and they have very big (biggest?) customer base. But not the new lenses I think, at least the link said so.
 

pdk42

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It‘s also the sweet spot for the Canon M series, which is the top mirrorless seller worldwide with much faster AF than Olympus. Fewer lenses, but it‘s not sure that this category upgrades lenses much anyway.

Canon’s made very sure that one can buy into an APS-C system at $400-$700, and then buy into FF at $1,000. Sony, too. Nikon not far behind. They are designing their product tiers with little to no overlap based on sensor size (D500 excepted).

With Olympus you don’t make a sensor jump as you go up the price tier. Sensor level IQ is replaced by in-camera stuff. Then you get to body party at the $1,500 range where the EM1.3 is $50 more than the Nikon Z6.

This is the source of the Olympus failure. The actual gap between the EM10 and EM1.3 is not $1,000, but maybe $600. Maybe. And this is especially true if there is only one 20MP m43 sensor available.

You don’t have to look any further than Panasonic introducing FF mirrorless who pretty much said just that at their introduction. Higher price points require bigger sensors. This likely why the Panasonic G9 is much cheaper than the EM1.3. Panny figured this out. Olympus did not. The alarm bells were likely ringing when the EM1.2 was released at $1999 with the “over-engineered” bragging. Investors and reviewers slammed the price point and within 2 weeks it was dropped $200. The market was already in a downturn. Management then doubled down with the EM1X. Their arrogance has been replaced by JIP and activist investors at the Board table.

This puts Olympus/JIP in a problem space of either massively reducing EM1 series costs and prices, or eliminating the line altogether. And they’d still have to reduce the EM5.3 from its current $1,000 (on sale!) price point as it is now intruding into FF space.

But if Olympus/JIP eliminates its Pro offerings, all of this goes away...

https://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/development-announcements

...and the NewCo entity will only have what we currently see below that series, where margins and profits are pretty much non-existent. Canon and Sony have both readily admitted they make profit off their bigger formats, and lose buckets on the lower-end. The closer a supplier gets to smartphone prices and sensor size, the worse it is. I cannot see NewCo and the m43 mount surviving with product diversity limited to EPL, EM10, and a trimmed down, less tech EM5 (basically a WR EM10), the TG series, and only consumer grade glass. Only the lower half of the lens roadmap would survive, so maybe 3-4 “splash proof” lenses. The entire m43 system is just a smaller sensor version of the Canon M series, put there by Canon and the other FF manufacturers.
I think this is a very good analysis, especially this point:

Higher price points require bigger sensors.
It's perhaps unfair, but it's true.

What's worse, Olympus invested nothing in improving the sensor for the last four years. Going to market with flagship cameras in 2020 (EM1x, EM1.3) that cost more than a entry-level FF needs something more than a 2015, non-BSI, m43 design. Of course, for the committed users like us, we can live with it because we can still see the benefits of the wider system and we know how to get the best out of the existing sensor. But, playing to your captive audience alone isn't enough.
 

RAH

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That's a good summary article, I think. I never heard of that magazine, so I looked into subscribing to the digital edition, but it only had a "UK only" offer, which I think is very strange. I mean, what else could I do - have a physical magazine delivered to me in the USA from the UK?!? Too bad...
 

Aristophanes

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pdk42

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That's a good summary article, I think. I never heard of that magazine, so I looked into subscribing to the digital edition, but it only had a "UK only" offer, which I think is very strange. I mean, what else could I do - have a physical magazine delivered to me in the USA from the UK?!? Too bad...
Amateur Photographer (AP to the cognoscenti) was by far the biggest and most successful of the UK photo mags in the print era. It carried, literally, thousands of ads from retailers and manufacturers in every issue. The editorial content was good with excellent contributors. Like most print media though, the internet has not been kind to it and it's now a shadow of itself in its hay-day. Another example of how the internet has changed the face of some industries!
 
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