Olympus specials - B&H

Darmok N Jalad

Temba, his aperture wide
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Is the extra $300 worth it to get the E-M5 Mark III with the 14-150mm Lens? $1199 with, $899 body only
I think it depends on what you think of that lens. I tried it since it's a superzoom, but I wasn't terribly happy with it, so I wouldn't personally go with the 14-150 option. I did, however, get the 12-45 f4, which is considerably more money, but it pairs quite nicely with the EM5iii for size/weight. Just my opinion here. Maybe I didn't give that lens a fair shake. Altogether possible since it took 3 tries for me to hang on to the 75-300.
:daz:
 

spdavies

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I love my 14-150 and I have almost every lens available in that range, both Oly and Panasonic.
It is my every day lens with my E-M1 and I have more finished shots with it than any of my other lenses.
 

Carbonman

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oddly most people with interchangeable lenses do not like changing their lenses on the fly
Yes, what's with that? One of the members of the camera club I'm a member of has a Nikon 850, another body and several lenses plus a large Olympus lens collection and a couple of E-M1 II bodies. He told me that he puts the lenses he's going to use on the bodies he'll be shooting with and doesn't change lenses until he's back home and has wiped down his equipment.
I figure out what I'm planning to shoot and pack the lenses I think I'll need, changing lenses and teleconverters as I go. Did this in the film era too.
 

ac12

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Totally off topic but why do you say that? It's really close to 85mm on a full frame which is probably the most popular portrait focal length. I'm just surprised to hear it because probably 20-30% of my images are with the 45mm.
Back in my day it was the 105.
So I guess it depends on era and what the norm is at that time.
 

ac12

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Yes, what's with that? One of the members of the camera club I'm a member of has a Nikon 850, another body and several lenses plus a large Olympus lens collection and a couple of E-M1 II bodies. He told me that he puts the lenses he's going to use on the bodies he'll be shooting with and doesn't change lenses until he's back home and has wiped down his equipment.
I figure out what I'm planning to shoot and pack the lenses I think I'll need, changing lenses and teleconverters as I go. Did this in the film era too.
IF you have the funds to buy a 2nd body, it is something that I was jokingly told is the "New York reload."
It is faster to switch to camera B, than to change lenses, and I agree with that.
But, I draw the line at two cameras. I have enough trouble using two, I can't see how I could use three. The straps would require planning, and maybe dedicated straps.

Now if he is shooting in a DUSTY environment, I understand that approach. Digital is more sensitve to dust on the sensor than film.
 
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IF you have the funds to buy a 2nd body, it is something that I was jokingly told is the "New York reload."
It is faster to switch to camera B, than to change lenses, and I agree with that.
But, I draw the line at two cameras. I have enough trouble using two, I can't see how I could use three. The straps would require planning, and maybe dedicated straps.

Now if he is shooting in a DUSTY environment, I understand that approach. Digital is more sensitve to dust on the sensor than film.
It varies for me. If I anticipate using only two lenses or if the weather looks iffy, I might use both my EM1.3 and 5.3. It is quicker to switch bodies than to switch lenses. It's a typical wedding technique too. If I don't anticipate having to make quick changes or take three or four lenses and one or two bodies, then I'll swap lenses as I go. It all depends. A dusty or wet environment almost guarantee no lens switching. Or, let's say I'm doing BIFs with the possibility of some close shots. I might set up the 1.3 for BIF with the 100-400, and put the 12-100 on the 5.3 for general shooting with a regular setup. For some it may be a hard and fast rule, but most of us are probably flexible.

I have a friend who likes to use three different camera bodies and lenses and wear them all with neck straps. And, I mean different, like a Nikon, Fuji, Canon, or an Olympus, plus maybe even a high-end point&shoot on a wrist strap. Plus two camera bags. (He's a compulsive GAS addict) I would never do that, besides we look dorky enough as is without making ourselves look like a Christmas tree with camera ornaments.
 
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Darmok N Jalad

Temba, his aperture wide
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Yes, what's with that? One of the members of the camera club I'm a member of has a Nikon 850, another body and several lenses plus a large Olympus lens collection and a couple of E-M1 II bodies. He told me that he puts the lenses he's going to use on the bodies he'll be shooting with and doesn't change lenses until he's back home and has wiped down his equipment.
I figure out what I'm planning to shoot and pack the lenses I think I'll need, changing lenses and teleconverters as I go. Did this in the film era too.
I used to be scared about switching on the fly, but now I just do it. My main concern now is not dropping either lens in the process or losing a cap.
 

ac12

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One example of using two cameras was at an athletic awards presentation.
12-100 on the EM10 shooting the athlete getting their award at the award table. I was about 30 feet away from the table.
12-40 on the EM1 shooting the AD with the athlete. I was standing in front of the AD.
I was bouncing back and forth between the two cameras.
I was expecting one of the students to shoot one of the positions. Well I ended up shooting both :(

As for changing lenses, I got this idea from "somewhere." So no claim to have discovered this.
I use a duty belt, which is supported by suspenders.
The suspender eliminates the problem of making the belt so tight that my back hurts, especially since I have a bad back. And I don't have to worry about the weight of the loaded belt pulling everything down from my waist.​
On the duty belt, I have 3 lens pouches. Depending on the shoot I select which and how many of the 3 pouches to use.
This looks and works similar to the military ALICE system.

This is the lens change process:
Remove lens from camera, put on rear cap, place into empty pouch.​
Pull out lens from pouch, remove rear cap, mount onto camera.​
It works pretty well, but fully loaded up, I cannot walk very fast.

The only bad part is putting the blasted thing on, as the suspender is not secured to the belt, and moves around the belt, making it a real PITA to put on. That is the problem with a "cobble together" kit. I would like something where the suspender is SECURED to the belt.
 
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I shot during a wedding ceremony (not professionally) and there were only 3 photographers allowed, so I opted for carrying two cameras - something which I usually do not do because I only shoot for fun, and don't need to get every shot 'right'.

I used the 12-40 Pro on the E-M1 and the 40-150R on the E-M10 Mark ii.
With the former, I was able to get the wide shot of the newlyweds walking down the aisle, the group shot as well as some nice portraits of friends and family close to me.
I used the latter to get a couple of shots of the band and close-ups of family seated on the other side.

I was wearing formal clothing so I wanted the most minimal setup, no harness or suspenders for me (not that I would have anything like that, either).
The lighter E-M10 ii combo I kept on a slim shoulder strap so I could carry the camera behind me when not in use. This is my favorite way to carry a camera on most trips, because it frees both hands.
I carried the 'heavy' E-M1+12-40 kit with a thick wrist strap for optimal grip, but from time to time holstered the camera on my belt using the PeakDesign Capture Clip, which also enabled me to free both hands to access the other camera.

After the ceremony, I stashed the E-M1 and walked around with only the E-M10 ii + grip + 12-40 Pro until the light ran out, when I switched to the PanaLeica 15mm f1.7

Conclusion, shoot the scene without lens changes, change lenses when the scene (and/or the light) changes!
 

PakkyT

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Yes, what's with that? One of the members of the camera club I'm a member of has a Nikon 850, another body and several lenses plus a large Olympus lens collection and a couple of E-M1 II bodies. He told me that he puts the lenses he's going to use on the bodies he'll be shooting with and doesn't change lenses until he's back home and has wiped down his equipment.
Now if he is shooting in a DUSTY environment, I understand that approach. Digital is more sensitve to dust on the sensor than film.
I used to be scared about switching on the fly, but now I just do it.
I blame it back when the first interchangeable cameras came out and people acted like the sensors had their pixels directly exposed to the world and were super delicate and even THINKING about touching it, let alone cleaning it, would cause the sensor to explode and you were a fool if you didn't have it done by a "professional" Couple that with no automatic dust clearing systems like the ultrasonic cleaning we have always had on every Olympus since the E-1 were the early Nikons and such would tend to pick up a little dust now and then. Everyone acted like, well if you are foolish enough that you must change your lens in the field then you need to throw a tent over your head, hold your breath, change it in no more than 3 seconds flat, only hold the camera opening down, sacrifice a chicken, etc. and so anyone new to such a system were scared to death to interchange a lens on the interchangeable camera without a clean-room.

The reality is sensors are tough. The pixel part of the sensor are under several layers of glass/filters, you won't hurt them at all with gentle cleaning when needed, and most of the time when you do get a little dust or something on your sensor it likely won't be noticed on 90% of your shots until you get that one shot of a blue sky photographed with a closed down aperture and then you notice a little blob. A quick blow of air is often enough to take care of it. When you have the right supplies on hand, wet cleaning is simple if needed. The same people who freak out about this are probably the same people that clean their lens front element every time they see even a spec of dust or a tiny spittle of dried liquid on it. As if a tiny bit of dust on the lens is going to affect their photos.

I actually think if people got over these irrational fears they would actually enjoy their cameras a lot more when they are now free to change lenses willy nilly without fear anymore instead of agonizing about which ONE lens to take out that day because once out of the house it can not be removed.
 

PhotoCal

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I blame it back when the first interchangeable cameras came out and people acted like the sensors had their pixels directly exposed to the world and were super delicate and even THINKING about touching it, let alone cleaning it, would cause the sensor to explode and you were a fool if you didn't have it done by a "professional" Couple that with no automatic dust clearing systems like the ultrasonic cleaning we have always had on every Olympus since the E-1 were the early Nikons and such would tend to pick up a little dust now and then. Everyone acted like, well if you are foolish enough that you must change your lens in the field then you need to throw a tent over your head, hold your breath, change it in no more than 3 seconds flat, only hold the camera opening down, sacrifice a chicken, etc. and so anyone new to such a system were scared to death to interchange a lens on the interchangeable camera without a clean-room.

The reality is sensors are tough. The pixel part of the sensor are under several layers of glass/filters, you won't hurt them at all with gentle cleaning when needed, and most of the time when you do get a little dust or something on your sensor it likely won't be noticed on 90% of your shots until you get that one shot of a blue sky photographed with a closed down aperture and then you notice a little blob. A quick blow of air is often enough to take care of it. When you have the right supplies on hand, wet cleaning is simple if needed. The same people who freak out about this are probably the same people that clean their lens front element every time they see even a spec of dust or a tiny spittle of dried liquid on it. As if a tiny bit of dust on the lens is going to affect their photos.

I actually think if people got over these irrational fears they would actually enjoy their cameras a lot more when they are now free to change lenses willy nilly without fear anymore instead of agonizing about which ONE lens to take out that day because once out of the house it can not be removed.
This made me laugh. It reminded me of the early days of the pandemic, when people talked about wiping camera bodies with Lysol and not opening new packages for three days in case the UPS driver coughed in the truck.
 
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I blame it back when the first interchangeable cameras came out and people acted like the sensors had their pixels directly exposed to the world and were super delicate and even THINKING about touching it, let alone cleaning it, would cause the sensor to explode and you were a fool if you didn't have it done by a "professional" Couple that with no automatic dust clearing systems like the ultrasonic cleaning we have always had on every Olympus since the E-1 were the early Nikons and such would tend to pick up a little dust now and then. Everyone acted like, well if you are foolish enough that you must change your lens in the field then you need to throw a tent over your head, hold your breath, change it in no more than 3 seconds flat, only hold the camera opening down, sacrifice a chicken, etc. and so anyone new to such a system were scared to death to interchange a lens on the interchangeable camera without a clean-room.

The reality is sensors are tough. The pixel part of the sensor are under several layers of glass/filters, you won't hurt them at all with gentle cleaning when needed, and most of the time when you do get a little dust or something on your sensor it likely won't be noticed on 90% of your shots until you get that one shot of a blue sky photographed with a closed down aperture and then you notice a little blob. A quick blow of air is often enough to take care of it. When you have the right supplies on hand, wet cleaning is simple if needed. The same people who freak out about this are probably the same people that clean their lens front element every time they see even a spec of dust or a tiny spittle of dried liquid on it. As if a tiny bit of dust on the lens is going to affect their photos.

I actually think if people got over these irrational fears they would actually enjoy their cameras a lot more when they are now free to change lenses willy nilly without fear anymore instead of agonizing about which ONE lens to take out that day because once out of the house it can not be removed.
Swapping lenses does take time and, depending on the environment (e.g., you are in the audience at an event), can be inconvenient as well. When I take pictures at a concert, I usually have a telephoto (or telephoto zoom) on one body for individual band member pictures and a wide angle on the other body so that I can get a shot of the entire band. The time it takes to swap lenses can make the difference between getting a great shot or not, especially for live events. Also, where possible, I try to use an Olympus lens on an Olympus body and a Panasonic lens on a Panasonic body. This isn't a big an issue now that Panasonic has IBIS, but when Panasonic had just OIS, I wanted to have some form of IS.
 

PakkyT

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Swapping lenses does take time and, depending on the environment (e.g., you are in the audience at an event), can be inconvenient as well.
Sure, there are times where it isn't convenient or there are some like yourself who will carry two cameras around with you or one might miss the next shot fast changing scenes, but those are all more the exceptions. My comment was more of a general statement towards most people who carry ONE camera around with them and are not in time critical situations who simply refuse to change a lens "in the field" for no other reason than the don't want to carry other lenses with them or are afraid to change on the fly.
 
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