Review Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III first impression (from E-M1 Mark I upgrade) (Updated: 03.05.2020)

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Disclaimer:
1) This is the most high-end camera I ever had, so I have very little comparison information to other brands or models that I could give besides the E-M1 Mark I.
2) This is the first brand new camera I have since I started photography ( 11 years ago, one year with Pentax K200D, and 10 years of Micro Four Thirds, Panasonic G2, G1, GX-7, Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II, E-M1 Mark I) so that should tell you what budget and limitations I had before.
3) I am doing this post because I want to collect my thoughts and experiences with the E-M1 Mark III for future references when I will write a review as well as have a conversation with the community on different aspects of the camera.
So on to it:

Day 1 & 2:
*Packaging (the boring stuff first), haven't noticed anything special or extra. Just the usual cardboard box and default options are given with cameras. What I have noticed is that the E-M1 Mark III does not come with any flash attachments (compared to previous models). At least that little flash was useful for commanding other wireless flashes or a bit of Fill-in-Flash from time to time. On the paperwork, it comes with a basic manual which gives an average Joe some steps on how to use the camera ... in more languages than most people could come up on the spot, as thick as a pinky finger. For the UK I would have preferred a decent manual if they are going to give you a manual just in English.

*Build ... compared to E-M1 Mark I: it feels very impressive so far. The grip is chunkier and more comfortable to hold. With my finger on the shutter, my pinky is sitting about 2/3-1/2 (depending on how well I grip it) on the body, which is an improvement where the first model my pinky would fall under the camera. I don't feel the extra weight, quite well distributed around the body to make it feel stable and dense. The weather resistance seems to be just as resilient, going home from work this morning I got the typical West English weather (rain so dense and thick I could feel my throat and lungs getting hydrated and moisturized), the camera broke no sweat against the wind and heavy rain. (One of the big reasons why I love and trust Olympus so much, the only other manufacturer who does proper weather resistance is Pentax).
The EVF ... it feels a lot better than the first E-M1, it looks sharper (especially in motion) and the 120 Hz feels very smooth. I do see the pixelation when using the Digital 2x TC (I use it for framing for cropping later since I shoot RAW) and it makes it more difficult to judge AF accuracy, same issue was with E-M1 Mark I and I wished Olympus would have gone with 3.6 Milion Dots or maybe even 5.4 Milion Dots. Stranger still is that using the Digital Magnification and half-pressing the shutter gives a sharper image in the EVF but at lower FPS, so that makes me think there are some processing sacrifices to display the data through the EVF at 2x TC.
Update: I have noticed that the EVF still has the same bug/issue after 7 years (possibly more), I have noticed this since I had the Panasonic G1/G2. If you have the EVF active (looking through it) and the camera does a processing job (like applying Long Exposure Noise Reduction, High-Resolution Stacking, Focus Stacking, etc) the progress bar and screen will be stuck on the EVF if you pull back from the camera. The back-screen will not activate from the EVF if there is a processing/busy task is in ... well ... progress. And this applies fro the back-screen if you want to look through the EVF. I don't know if it's a hardware or software limitation, maybe Olympus is putting 100% of the camera processing power into that task and everything else in the camera as input is being ignored. Not a huge issue but a slight annoyance that I am surprised they haven't dealt with for such a long time. (Don't know if any of the other brands have this issue or dealt with it, I would see Sony being the only one capable of fixing this their crazy A9 processing power).

Update #2 (03.05.2020): With the camera in hand at waist level until I raise it to my eye the Startup time is not fast enough, and the same with the EVF auto-switch it has a lag that will make you miss 1/2 sec to 1 second of action until the EVF is on (including the time to raise the camera to the eye). Both could and should be improved in the future (not sure a firmware can help).
The Build Quality is very re-assuring, has used it in heavy rain, wind, muddy, and some foliage scrubbing on the camera and lens (from getting in a low position, hiding in the foliage, getting as close as I could, etc). I was worried about the change of location of the AE/AL button but the new grip makes it easier to use it as Back Button AF (but I would still prefer the location closer to the EVF because my hand and thumb fall more naturally on it as it was on the Mark I). The grip is very comfortable and reassuring of my hold on the camera, from the 660 grams Panasonic Leica 50-200mm f 2.8-4 (the heaviest and longest lens I have) to the Sigma 60mm f 2.8 at 160 grams (the lightest AF lens I have). I can even fit about half my pinky on the bottom, but I am thinking of adding an L bracket to extend the bottom part for a more comfortable hold with big lenses.

The backscreen looks very beautiful, sharp, and accurate colors. Going back to the full flip-out screen was an easy and quick transition (thanks to the E-M5 Mark II).

*Shutter Mechanism: It's so dampened. I was impressed when I switched to E-M5 Mark II, it felt a lot softer and gentler than Panasonic's GX-7 clickety-clack shutter. E-M1 Mark I is quiet enough compared to DSLRs but it still has a higher pitch mechanical sound to it and it has some force behind it (when you have the eye to the EVF). The E-M1 Mark III has softened the force it uses to close the shutter, it makes slow shutter speeds feel more comfortable (the force needed to push down the shutter button feels higher then the actual shutter mechanism moving around. The burst modes do feel a bit stronger, probably because the force starts accumulating as you rack those shots, but in single shots, I can barely feel it.
I have not tested the rolling shutter yet but that will come with the time of usage with high-speed subjects, most likely birds in flight.

*Battery Life: (I don't know how I forgot about this one) I wasn't overly impressed by the new battery, but that might be because of the upgraded TruePic 9 processor needing a lot more power. The battery went from 100% to 33% from one hour of looking through the Menu system (trying to set up the way E-M1 Mark I is) and about 2 hours of shooting pictures (in the rain and about 10 C outside). Some light usage of HHHR and Pro Capture as well. I'm happy that I bought the camera with 2 extra batteries since I was expecting this might be the case (as is with most mirrorless cameras). At least one extra battery is absolutely a must.
Update: The camera can charge through USB-C but not while it's on. A bit disappointing for those who need very long fieldwork, making multiple batteries still a necessity. At least you can charge 2 batteries at the same time with the stock charger and in-camera. I ordered the Hanhel Dual Cube charger for Olympus so I could charge 2+1+1= 4 batteries at the same time if I really need to. I will need to add an external Dual USB charger for convenience and less charging units needed to work with while traveling (one high powered 4 USB output charger could charge my phone, the camera and 2 extra batteries and my tablet).

Update #2 (03.05.2020): The battery life seems to be improved but not impressively so. I used 3 batteries (to 37%, 25%, and 11%) in an 8-hour trip (I was far from any humans, out in fields) with around 2.500 images made (Burst mode, HHHR, single shot, mechanical and electronic shutter). Depending on usage I'm getting around 3-4 hours per battery. I feel happy about purchasing 2 extra batteries when I bought the E-M1 Mark III. If you need Charging and using it in real-time it seems that only ONE power bank can do that (tested and confirmed by Olympus and Olympus users): Anker PowerCore+ 26800 PD (the camera needs very specific voltage to charge and stay on).

*Physical controls. I was expecting some differences to make it a bit annoying to get used to but that will go away with time. I for the 3 hours I have tested it so far I keep pressing the INFO button on E-M1 Mark III because that's where the Playback button used to be on E-M1 Mark I, constantly changing my information displayed. The new position for the Menu button doesn't seem to bother me at all.
What I was more worried about was the location change for the AEL/AEF button and switch for using Back-button Focus for wildlife. This button feels a tiny bit bigger (same responsitivity) but farther from the EVF making the thumb move closer to the edge of the back grip and distance the palm of the hand from the grip. SO FAR it hasn't been too much of a problem because the grip is deeper and more sculped for the hand to wrap around, but on the E-M1 Mark I I always had big problems using AEL/AEF button for Back Focus because it would cramp my hand so hard after a few minutes I would have to stop using the camera (and I have quite average to smaller than Medium size hands).
The swapping of right to the left side of the Mode 1/2 Switch hasn't felt too strange and I was soooooo tempted to put the switch to On/Off so I can turn the camera on one-handed (and making my reaction to instant moments just that a bit quicker) but WHY OLYMPUS can't we swap the function of the original On/Off so we don't lose any control options that we can use (just add *1 and *2 to the ON and OFF writing on the body with a / between).
The new AF joystick is lovely ... I just never had one before and I keep forgetting it's there for me to use. Well, that's what it means to go from mid-range to high-end cameras, some features feel alien for a while.

*In-camera controls and menus: Looks like I will have to re-learn once more (when I went from Panasonic GX-7 to Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II) as there are quite a bit more, and new, menu options and some of the old one reshuffled positions. The amount of AF options and functions are so much bigger now it will take me some time to learn how they apply to my usage (tutorials can help only so much until you realize how you prefer to use your own camera). My Menu is very useful but it will take some usage to get to build it to your needs, right now most of the options I added is Autofocus related.
Update: A slight annoyance, when using the Drive Mode button on the top left side of the camera it gives me different Flash modes options on top row and Drive modes on the bottom and you can change the Flash modes even though you don't have any flash attached or connected. The problem is if you put some Flash modes on the Drive mode options get blocked (like the HHHR option being grayed out). I wish Olympus would gray out the Flash modes IF you don't have any flashes attached or connected. Slight annoyance until I get used to which dial turns which settings instinctively.

Update #2: (03.05.2020): I am noticing some issues that are becoming a bit frustrating until they are engraved in my daily usage: The camera can't change modes while writing to the card (I do not know if this is a limitation of UHS-I, since I don't own UHS-II cards yet, or if it's a OS/Processing limitation), for example:
*if I shot a burst and the camera is writing the images I cannot change the drive mode like HHHR or Costume modes. I had a few times where I heard a kestrel and a crow fighting in mid-air and I quickly put the camera in my C4 (where I have made settings specifically for birds in flight, AF-C, 9x5 AF grid, AF Limiter On with 5-250 meters, AF Speed -3, Shutter Priority, 1/2.000 Sec, Auto ISO, 15 FPS Mechanical Burs) and shoot until they are out of reasonable size in the frame at 400mm Equiv. 35mm (which is about 7-10 seconds) and I cannot change out of C4 until the buffer is cleared.
*I was shooting an HHHR image of a bunny (it was standing extremely still) and right after the big hedge on my left there was an opening so I was heading through to get to work and in a field of grass about 50 cm tall with 2 huge tractor tracks that cut the grass down there was a doe running towards me until it realized I was there, I raised the camera to my eye and I forgot it was in HHHR and I realized it took 16 images of a moving subject (so the image was useless) and I tried changing out of this mode (which I assigned as C1 to top Fn button) and it wouldn't respond until the HHHR stitching was done AND write the file to the card, to which the doe already fled even though I was standing as still as I humanly could but I missed one epic shot. I would attribute this to human error but the camera is not helping much in this situation.


*IBIS: It's too early for me to tell how much improvement there is or in what circumstances to expect better performance. Right now, I and the IBIS (for this camera) are like 2 dancers who don't know each other at all so we keep stepping on each other. It will take some time to find the rhythm. I got sharp images at 4 seconds/19mm and got blurry shot at 1/8 second at 12mm ... let's call it user error :)
Update: IBIS seems to be crazy good with the Olympus 7-14mm f 2.8 Pro, no doubt because of the wide-angle nature of the lens. But 2 to 6-second handheld seems all but guaranteed sharp images. I managed to do a couple of HHHR at 2 seconds each (of the stitching final) image and it looked quite sharp on the back-screen of the camera. I need to verify this potential a bit more.

Update #2 (03.05.2020): I have tried to use IBIS over OIS on the Panasonic Leica 50-200mm f 2.8-4 and the IBIS has a hard time keeping up at the 200mm end. The IBIS engages but after about 3-4mm (in the viewfinder) of movement in either direction and the IBIS resets itself as it doesn't have the space to stabilize more. It makes the view at 200mm feel very wavy and a bit difficult to use in less than ideal conditions (wind, cold, tiredness, unstable ground). Switching back to lens priority (OIS) made it easier to handhold at 200mm. I can see why Olympus is putting Sync IS on longer than 150mm FL but it also makes it even more disappointing that there is no co-operation between Olympus and Panasonic for Sync/Dual IS with both brands, for longer than 150mm it is sorely needed.

*HHHR: Do not try to fool the IBIS by limiting the movement variation of the camera to do HHHR (like, let's say, putting the camera on the ground and moving it just slightly thinking you can get sharper high-resolution images). HHHR only really works when it has up+down+left+right micro-movements to add the necessary information to stitch those images. My personal conjecture is that, while High-Resolution stacking does 16 images in a specific order of movement to give you the output, the Hand Held High-Resolution stacking does 8 images taken with out of order movement from the randomness of being imperfect biological meat-sacks (Star Wars: KOTOR reference :p ) to give a smaller output, hence HHHR gives only (?!? isn't that enough really) 50 Megapickles RAW OR JPEG while HR gives up to 80 Megapickles RAW images. I will do side by side comparison between HR and HHHR from both E-M1 Mark III and E-M5 Mark II (but don't expect perfect scientific results, I am a biological meat-sack with a sh*^%y tripod and displeasure towards these 3 legged creatures).
Update #2 (03.05.2020): The HHHR works quite well even in more difficult or complicated situations. So far I managed to get very good images from 2 Second exposures to 1/8.000 second and subject movement should be minimal IF your subject is big in the frame, small subjects like foliage, leaves, trees, can accept some movement (BUT the more you sharpen the image in post the more the movement errors will show up AND the RAW files will need a lot of sharpening to brink them to good levels, from 66 to 125 Sharpness, 1.5 Radius and 50 Details in Lightroom). The noise is so well controlled in HHHR that I feel very comfortable with even ISO 6.400 if the situation needs it. I would agree with others that it's around 2 stops lower noise compared to single shots.
For landscapes, HHHR has become my default mode of making images not because of resolution but noise control and options for cropping.


*AF-S/AF-C: Daaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaamn Jesus Christ (and I'm an atheist). AF-S is a lot snappier, especially in dark and low contrast. It can still hunt but now it's more of a rare occasion compared to E-M1 Mark I. It gives me a lot more confidence in the camera and I noticed it made me a lot more trigger happy with the shutter. On the E-M1 Mark I, I could start to tell when it was too hard for that camera to get the focus so I would either just forgo the shot or try to work the scene to help the AF (like get the brighter background or wait for more light if the light wasn't constant).
AF-C is a beast as well. It would track the small birds with a lot more confidence and commitment and that's at fairly default settings and complete user ignorance of more advance features from the menus. I still have to look through the images I made this morning to confirm more of what I have seen in the EVF. The only strange behavior I have seen so far was just about at the end before getting home I found a Eurasian blackbird perched on a 1.5-meter tall live fence with windows in the background and when I tried to put the AF-C (with the AEL/AFL button) on it the AF was shaking so hard back and forth in a micro-adjustment maneuver that it felt like the epileptic broken game physics that games used to have back in early 2000 (think of broken body physics in Half-Life 2 when it would get stuck in objects). It lasted about 2 seconds and stopped when I let the button go and I couldn't recreate the issue after that.
I tested a bit the Pro Capture but only the High setting because I have only (and I love it to bits) Panasonic Leica DG-Elmarit 50-200mm f 2.8-4 as a telephoto option. The speed is bonkers and it can be hard to judge how long to burst it because the EVF slows down enough that I don't know where the subject went from the frame. Being stuck in AF-S at this speed is a disappointment but I think if using it at f 4 at distance longer then 5-10 meters the DoF would be enough to keep the subject sharp IF moving sideways ONLY. Now I don't know who to blame for this annoyance, Panasonic maybe doesn't want to share the AF algorithm of their lenses to keep up with the data such a mode would require or maybe Olympus is like that cousin who wants the girl even though the party has enough girls (aka customers) and even though they could go for the twin to make everything work for everyone :p (bad analogy?)
Update/edit: I just tried my Olympus 14-54mm f 2.8-3.5 and it performs very poorly. It hurts like crazy with racking focus from minimum to infinity multiple times. It is indoor with poor light but E-M1 Mark I do it quicker then E-M1 Mark III. Very strange and I wasn't expecting this since the E-M1 Mark III has better PDAF sensors, I need more investigation (until I sell the lens because I got the Olympus 12-40mm f 2.8 as a replacement for it) as I have a curiosity and interest in Olympus 150mm f 2 (I think Olympus will take their sweet time to come with a successor for it).

Update #2 (03.05.2020): AF-C is improved a lot and it makes it a breeze to use in great to good light and in more difficult light it can be managed but it does seem to have a character that needs to be learned to get the most out of it. In low light (ISO 3.200 - 6.400) the AF-C has a tendency to move back and forward a lot more than being sure it found the subject. I have seen it go beyond the subject (birds, foxes, and deer) no matter the depth of the subject. But if the contrast gets higher the AF-C is more stable and shorter in its travel. I have seen this in a forested situation where the light was bouncing through foliage and on the subject changing its level of contrast every second. I do wonder if there's any room for improvement in future firmware updates. This does not give me confidence that AI Recognition and Tracking for wildlife will come or be functional to E-M1 Mark III with a single Processor and current AF generation (more likely it will be more usable and possible in E-M1 X Mark II with Dual TruePic 9 and potentially better AF sensors).

*Image Quality. This is absolutely speculative since I saw the images only on the back screen but the images looked a bit sharper (just enough to be noticeably better) and the noise was just a bit better (range ISO 1600 to 6400). I will try to go through the images and post some samples here later (I have to go back to work tonight and I'm left with 7 hours to sleep until then).
Update: I'm adding 3 pictures made with HR and HHRR modes on the Olympus 7-14mm f 2.8 Pro. The images are one-stop overexposed to test the highlight retention at ISO 64, 100 and 200. There is a different composition, it's not easy to frame exactly handheld.

https://1drv.ms/u/s!AksBB2IBTehLg-RiRRkM9DPqLrMRrg?e=1tQKUr
Update #2 (03.05.2020): After getting a handle on how the 20 Megapickles files react to my preferred edits and look I am loving the IQ of the sensor and it is an improvement over 16 MP. With local brush adjustments of -33 Clarity and 50 Noise Reduction, I can get rid of noise very well even at ISO 6.400. Under good light, there's a lot you can get out of RAW files but in mediocre or low light the files definitely need good treatment in post.

*
Four Thirds Lenses. At the moment I have only the Olympus 14-54mm f 2.8-3.5 I can test but I am going to get some more in the future.
Olympus 14-54mm f 2.8-3.5 Mark I: The AF is quicker then CDAF only Olympus cameras as well as E-M1 Mark I. It's not to the level of native Micro Four Thirds but for landscapes and portraits it is good enough. The IQ seems to be lower than 16 MP sensors, wide open the images seem softer on 20 MP (I don't think this lens was designed to work with such high-resolution sensor, this lens came out when 6 MP was considered high-end). Stopping down to f 4 or f 5.6 improves the sharpness a bit but I would argue that at that point the Low to Midrange Olympus and Panasonic lenses offer you better value, they are as sharp or sharper, smaller and lighter, the AF is better, Chromatic Aberrations and Vignietting is better controlled.

I will keep updating this post through the next few weeks as I am gathering more experience with it ... but so far I am very excited and dare I say beyond happy (please to remember it's an upgrade from a 7-year-old camera). I have a growing excitement for photography after having such a dark and depressing winter and I will be pumped for better weather and more staying outside.
I will put the newest updates in Italic and the old text in Bold.
 
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PakkyT

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Update/edit: I just tried my Olympus 14-54mm f 2.8-3.5 and it performs very poorly. It hurts like crazy with racking focus from minimum to infinity multiple times. It is indoor with poor light but E-M1 Mark I do it quicker then E-M1 Mark III. Very strange and I wasn't expecting this since the E-M1 Mark III has better PDAF sensors, I need more investigation (until I sell the lens because I got the Olympus 12-40mm f 2.8 as a replacement for it) as I have a curiosity and interest in Olympus 150mm f 2 (I think Olympus will take their sweet time to come with a successor for it).
This is where my interest in your review lies. I have the E-M1.1 as well and a few old 4/3rds lenses, so I am looking forward to eventually upgrading from my current linear PDAF points to the cross types on the newer models. I am always interested in hearing experiences with the new bodies and the old lenses.

One thought, is your ZD 14-54 the mark 1 or the mark 2? As the mark 2 was CDAF optimized, if you have that one could it be some sort of conflict with the camera switching between the two types of AF methods or something of that sort? If you have the original version, then nevermind.
 

Mack

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Regarding the back button focus comment, could be with the newer camera you won't need it if you can trust the better E-M1 III AF + Tracking.

I found with the E-M1X it seems to miss more by using BBF as the DOF is just too shallow, maybe 1/2 inch or less, with m43 and me trying to get closer to BIF or using a strong tele with its shallow DOF. BIF just move to quick for me to double-up on buttons so I ignore the BBF and just set up a tighter Focus LImiter range in the menu for the lens to spin off in.

Anyhoo, have fun with the new camera! At times I wish I had one as the E-M1X is pretty heavy, imho. I have the older E-M1 II and really do notice thee weight difference between them.
 

ac12

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I have the EM1-mk2, but similar points as you
  • On the mk1, AF point would briefly light up green, then go back to light grey. That light grey outline is often hard to see, when the action is moving fast.
    On the mk2 (and probably the mk3) the AF point stays green, so it is MUCH easier to hold the AF point on a moving subject.
  • I found the EVF on the mk2 much better for fast/eraticly moving subjects. For me that was a BAD problem on the mk1.
    • This was the #1 reason that I got the mk2, and why I use the mk2 for sports.
  • AF-C. Agree, the mk2 is much better than the mk1.
But these issues was primarily in sports photography, where I was pushing the limits of the mk1.
For general photography, the mk1 was/is just fine, for me.
 
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  • #5
This is where my interest in your review lies. I have the E-M1.1 as well and a few old 4/3rds lenses, so I am looking forward to eventually upgrading from my current linear PDAF points to the cross types on the newer models. I am always interested in hearing experiences with the new bodies and the old lenses.

One thought, is your ZD 14-54 the mark 1 or the mark 2? As the mark 2 was CDAF optimized, if you have that one could it be some sort of conflict with the camera switching between the two types of AF methods or something of that sort? If you have the original version, then nevermind.
I have the Mark I version. Tonight and tomorrow I want to stick with Olympus 7-14mm f 2.8 Pro to see what kind of images I can make, I never had a lens wider than 14mm before. After tomorrow I will slap on the ZD 14-54mm until Friday and see if I can test it more rigorously, maybe it was just a fluke. I don't have any other Four-Thirds lenses to give you more information, my old (and beloved) ZD 50-200mm f 2.8-3.5 Mark I is still broken (the 2nd front element inside the lens has detached itself and is freely floating and flipping inside the lens) and it's not reliable to give accurate AF or image quality. Maybe if I can find some dirt cheap lenses online or at LCE in Taunton I could make an article specifically for Four Thirds users. I have the Olympus MMF-3 as well as Panasonic's DMW-MA1 so no shortage of adapters here.
 
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Regarding the back button focus comment, could be with the newer camera you won't need it if you can trust the better E-M1 III AF + Tracking.

I found with the E-M1X it seems to miss more by using BBF as the DOF is just too shallow, maybe 1/2 inch or less, with m43 and me trying to get closer to BIF or using a strong tele with its shallow DOF. BIF just move to quick for me to double-up on buttons so I ignore the BBF and just set up a tighter Focus LImiter range in the menu for the lens to spin off in.

Anyhoo, have fun with the new camera! At times I wish I had one as the E-M1X is pretty heavy, imho. I have the older E-M1 II and really do notice thee weight difference between them.
That might be a possibility. E-M1 Mark I and more specifically ZD 50-200mm Mark I pushed me to learn to use Manual Mode instead of the preferred Aperture Mode I was using for the past 8 years, as well as moving to Back Button Focus for most of the wildlife in AF-C and a more reliance of AF-C, compared to AF-S. It would be, at least, a bit strange to go back to shooting on Shutter Button alone or more AF-S.

While E-M1X was very tempting for wildlife and birds in flight, I realized that Olympus has been using the Pen line to introduce new sensor technology:
*Pen E-P5 was the first one to have the 16 MP sensor before the OM-D E-M5 Mark I was introduced with the same sensor
*Pen-F was the first one to have the 20 MP sensor before the OM-D E-M1 Mark II was introduced with a similar sensor
While the OM-D E-M1 Mark I and II were the first ones to add PD-AF to their respective previous version of sensors, I think the E-M1 X versions will be the first ones to get new sensors from now one because Olympus has pretty much killed the Pen premium/high-end line. With the introduction of basically the same sensor on E-M1 Mark III, the next version that is in line for an upgraded sensor is E-M1 X Mark II, probably dual Pic 9 processor to be able to push the performance they want from a higher megapickles sensor. So I would wait for a bigger improvement to justify the cost difference and size, at least more features then 10-15% more AF performance (maybe bring AI and animal recognition tracking, I'm not a ciu ciu and vrum vrum fan :p )
But all of this is just pure speculation on my part :)
 
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I have the EM1-mk2, but similar points as you
  • On the mk1, AF point would briefly light up green, then go back to light grey. That light grey outline is often hard to see, when the action is moving fast.
    On the mk2 (and probably the mk3) the AF point stays green, so it is MUCH easier to hold the AF point on a moving subject.
  • I found the EVF on the mk2 much better for fast/eraticly moving subjects. For me that was a BAD problem on the mk1.
    • This was the #1 reason that I got the mk2, and why I use the mk2 for sports.
  • AF-C. Agree, the mk2 is much better than the mk1.
But these issues was primarily in sports photography, where I was pushing the limits of the mk1.
For general photography, the mk1 was/is just fine, for me.
Same here, it was only with birds and animals that I was finding myself frustrated, quite intensely at times, with E-M1 Mark I. For everything else it was perfectly enough. But with the promise of Hand Held High Resolution and Live ND the Mark III was tempting enough to upgrade even for the landscape part of my photography.

I have noticed there's a menu setting in E-M1 Mark III (and I think the Mark II as well) where you can "force" the AF point to stay light 100% of the time of usage (during half-press shutter/BBF and full-press as well) and it stays green as you said. I never noticed any annoyance or hindrance of lack of this in E-M1 Mark I, probably because the AF couldn't manage to AF for too long on anything moving.
 

comment23

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I have the EM1-mk2, but similar points as you
  • On the mk1, AF point would briefly light up green, then go back to light grey. That light grey outline is often hard to see, when the action is moving fast.
    On the mk2 (and probably the mk3) the AF point stays green, so it is MUCH easier to hold the AF point on a moving subject.
  • I found the EVF on the mk2 much better for fast/eraticly moving subjects. For me that was a BAD problem on the mk1.
    • This was the #1 reason that I got the mk2, and why I use the mk2 for sports.
  • AF-C. Agree, the mk2 is much better than the mk1.
But these issues was primarily in sports photography, where I was pushing the limits of the mk1.
For general photography, the mk1 was/is just fine, for me.
Same here, it was only with birds and animals that I was finding myself frustrated, quite intensely at times, with E-M1 Mark I. For everything else it was perfectly enough. But with the promise of Hand Held High Resolution and Live ND the Mark III was tempting enough to upgrade even for the landscape part of my photography.

I have noticed there's a menu setting in E-M1 Mark III (and I think the Mark II as well) where you can "force" the AF point to stay light 100% of the time of usage (during half-press shutter/BBF and full-press as well) and it stays green as you said. I never noticed any annoyance or hindrance of lack of this in E-M1 Mark I, probably because the AF couldn't manage to AF for too long on anything moving.
(Mark II/III) Menu—>Gears—>D3–>Grid Settings—>Display Color

This setting allows you to change the colour of the focus box (and grid).
 
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