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Olympus lenses: where is the aperture blade lever?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by astrostl, Oct 19, 2014.

  1. astrostl

    astrostl Mu-43 Veteran

    358
    Oct 4, 2014
    St. Louis, MO
    Justin Honold
    This forum has intensely detailed inspection advice at https://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=23559 , mentioning "traditional" aperture levers.

    Looking at a used 17mm, 45mm, and 75mm, I can't figure out how I can move the aperture blades to check for oil and such. Any tips?
     
  2. EarthQuake

    EarthQuake Mu-43 Top Veteran

    833
    Sep 30, 2013
    There is no aperture blade lever on native AF M43rds lenses, if you want to check the aperture, mount the lens on a camera, set a long exposure and set the aperture on the camera and look through the lens.

    Additionally, I think it would be extremely rare to find a native M43 lens that has oil on the blades, this is typically a defect that shows up after many years of use, 15+ or so generally. So there simply aren't M43rds lenses old enough to really show the problem. Not to say that its impossible, but its unlikely. Oily blades is much more common on vintage manual focuses lenses, where the oil from the focusing helicoid gradually seeps onto the aperture assembly.
     
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  3. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    Of the modern mounts: Nikon F, Sony/Minolta Alpha, and Pentax K have aperture levers.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. EarthQuake

    EarthQuake Mu-43 Top Veteran

    833
    Sep 30, 2013
    Yes and of those only Minolta MA/Sony A mount was a new mount, F and K having existed for decades before autofocus was a thing. Minolta was first to market with an AF system, which wasn't that much different to their existing MD lenses but with a different flange distance/mount and a gear in the lens for the body to focus, which Nikon and Pentax followed with similar implementations, but all three have gone to in-lens AF motors since, like Canon did in the late 80s when they introduced their AF based EOS EF system. Pretty much every AF camera system introduced after 1990 has had both in-lens focus motors and electronically controlled apertures.

    Sorry for the tangent, I just think the history of this stuff is interesting.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. astrostl

    astrostl Mu-43 Veteran

    358
    Oct 4, 2014
    St. Louis, MO
    Justin Honold
    Thx all!
     
  6. Reflector

    Reflector Mu-43 Veteran

    406
    Aug 31, 2013
    You can also set aperture preview to a button (Or just do a long exposure) and quickly demount the lens to check the backside blades if needed. It'll be like playing with Canon EF lenses and presetting the apertures.