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olympus epm2-menu diving

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by newfie, Jan 19, 2015.

  1. newfie

    newfie Mu-43 Veteran

    211
    Jan 15, 2015
    Canada
    Ian
    i watched a video where by olympus stated this camera was aimed at those stepping up from a point and shoot. What about someone looking for the functions a dslr in a small package? How's the Aperture, Shutter and ISO adjustments for real world? Too much menu diving?
     
  2. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    My first mirrorless camera coming from a dslr was the E-PM1. I found the lack of controls frustrating. If the controls on the E-PM2 are similar, you may as well. I usually shoot in A mode and like to easily be able to change both aperture and exposure compensation. I didn't like how I had to do that on the E-PM1. When the G5 went on a fire sale after the release of the G6 I picked one up dirt cheap and I have been much happier. As nice as the size is on the E-PM cameras, I just didn't enjoy shooting with it as much as I thought I would. You can still control everything, it just takes more steps to do some things and that frustrated me. But everyone is different and it may not bother you.
     
  3. Aegon

    Aegon Mu-43 Veteran

    334
    Nov 3, 2011
    Portland, OR
    I've used an E-P2 for years now. I use aperture priority with face detect, so that metering is done from the face and therefore I don't need exposure compensation. So I find a single control to be adequate. I also have the up arrow programmed to change modes so that up and down control aperture and left and right control shutter, which I use occasionally in manual mode.

    I love mine.
     
  4. slmoore

    slmoore Mu-43 Regular

    43
    Feb 15, 2014
    Oklahoma
    You will want to turn on the super control panel - that will give you a ton of settings when you push the OK button on the back. You still have to use the LCD, but it brings a lot of stuff up to the top level instead of having to dig for it.
     
  5. phigmov

    phigmov Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 4, 2010
    Seconded - Super Control Panel is a godsend. I used a E-P1 (full set of controls & dials) then went to an E-PM1 and initially found it frustrating but adapted quickly (I mainly use Aperture Priority so tend not to fiddle much).

    I'd try and get your hands on one and see how it feels for you.
     
  6. Evan614

    Evan614 Mu-43 Regular

    109
    May 6, 2014
    BuckeyeState
    I got my PM2 for $200... it was as cheap as a P&S and can handle my studio strobe and shoot in RAW.
    So I am loving it-- even though it lacks manual knobs to adjust things.
     
  7. RickinAust

    RickinAust Mu-43 Regular

    119
    Feb 9, 2013
    Australia
    Agree with previous posters. I have a E-PM2 as a second camera and though the controls are not as good as my EM5 once you activate the super control panel it is not too bad to use. It will not give you the ease of access that a DSLR style body would but it is certainly usable. I usually shoot with a 12mm on the E-PM2 and one of my other lenses on the EM5. Don't have any problem swapping between the two bodies.
    I have set up the fn button for back button focus and the movie button for HDR.
     
  8. janneman

    janneman Mu-43 Veteran

    414
    Dec 6, 2012
    Netherlands
    Jan (John) Kusters
    I use a PM2 as second camera to my E-M5. As far as possible (which is a lot) I copied the settings of the E-M5 onto the 'MySets' of the E-PM2 (one for quality colour, one for quality black and white, and one for low light fast 'getting a picture, no matter what quality'). In general I use both set to P, where the front top dial of the E=M5 and the rotating ring on the back of the E-PM2 function as program shift (change both aperture and shutter speed, keep the same exposure. The top back-dial on the E-M5 functions as exposure compensation (+ and -) On the PM2 this means press the top of the rear dial to change its function to exposure compensation, then turn the dial to whatever over or under exposure I want, and press the top of the back dial again to leave exposure compensation. On both camera's, pressing the centre button on the back dial enables me to change ISO from auto ISO to something I prefer with the left and right buttons od the back dial. That centre button remembers its last use, and will be on ISO setting the next time I press it. All in all for my use fast enough.

    During shoots I rarely have to go to menu or use the super control panel; most settings I can change in those are locked into the MySets.