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olympus em10 mkii

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by hyy, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. hyy

    hyy Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Apr 18, 2016
    hi all. i am totally new to photography and just bought my em10 mkii couple of days ago.

    was playing with A-mode around and set my f point to about 22 and took a few shots. every time i have to wait for a minute or two for noise reduction and the result of the image is blurring yet the EF and LCD is showing a clear image. nothing is changing when i was changing the f point from high to low or low to high.

    i have turned off Live View Boost.
    this happens with changing of exposure as well.

    how do i have my EF and LCD display what my image is going to be taken look like?
     
  2. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    With it set to f/22 you're going to get either severely underexposed images, or as you've found exposures lengths that are really long. Also if your shot is too slow in shutter speed exposure preview doesn't work. Set it to f/4, auto ISO - what exposure setting does that actually result in?
     
  3. hyy

    hyy Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Apr 18, 2016
    i am on a mode. so i guess my shutter speed is auto? my iso is on auto but it is showing as 1600 on the side. isnt it too high on a morning room with sunlight?

    the image came out blurry and whiteish.

    so here is the problem. what i am looking at is not what i am getting. i am a beginner. so i have no idea when i am getting under or over expose. the VF and LCD is not showing under or over expose.

    also. can you explain why when i set my f to 3.6 or f22. nothing is changing?
     
  4. bomo

    bomo Mu-43 Regular

    95
    May 7, 2014
    Hudson Valley, New York
    Wayne
    Try taking a shot with the camera in iAuto and see if you get a proper exposure.
     
  5. hyy

    hyy Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Apr 18, 2016
    shots in auto is fine.
    nothing is wrong. it is just that when i am changing the f point there is no change in the VF or LCD. either a f3.6 or f22, there is no change in the lcd or ef. but the image came out is not exactly what i have seen.
    searched about this and was told to off live view boost. but it isnt helping.
     
  6. bomo

    bomo Mu-43 Regular

    95
    May 7, 2014
    Hudson Valley, New York
    Wayne
    Try this - take a pic in iAuto mode. Look at the exposure that was used - shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Switch your camera to Manual mode. Dial in the same values including the ISO. Your LCD should display a proper exposure. Now try moving the aperture up and own a click at a time. You should observe the exposure change in the LCD.
     
  7. bomo

    bomo Mu-43 Regular

    95
    May 7, 2014
    Hudson Valley, New York
    Wayne
    Something to keep in mind -- The LCD/EVF will show changes in exposure but only to a point. Once you're about 5 stops away from proper exposure, the display will no longer change.

    If you're in Aperture mode, changing the aperture may not show a change in exposure. The camera will be changing the ISO/shutter speed as it tries to maintain a proper exposure.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
  8. hyy

    hyy Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Apr 18, 2016
    thanks for the info. that explain to me clearly why the camera isnt changing. now i can understand it.

    so how does i know my image taken will not be the same as i see from the camera? is there any indication? because i will need to wait for a minute or two for the noise reduction everytime.

    i dont have my camera with me now as i am at work.

    i tried to take a blurry background by zooming out to max and kept at lowest f point which is f5.6. using the kit lens.

    iso and shutter is on auto since i am at a-mode.

    the image taken doesnt have a blurry background. i focused on my softtoy face. but the background is still quite clear. tried further from the background but it isnt blurry. it just not so clear but still have the background.

    is there any tips.
     
  9. bomo

    bomo Mu-43 Regular

    95
    May 7, 2014
    Hudson Valley, New York
    Wayne
    To get a blurred background, you need a shallow DOF (depth of field). DOF is controlled by several things:
    - Focal Length (Longer equals shallow DOF)
    - Aperture (Wider (lower f stop) equals shallow DOF)
    - Distance from the camera to the subject (Closer to the subject equals shallow DOF)

    It is possible to blur the background with the kit lens which is I assume the 14-42 zoom. Set your camera in Aperture mode and set the aperture to the lowest possible number. This will be f3.5 if the lens is at 14mm. Zoom the lens all the way out to 42mm. At 42mm, your aperture will change to f5.6. This is OK. Focus the camera as close as you can to the subject. This will involve getting as close to the subject and still having the camera acquire focus. Take the picture. If the background is sufficiently far away, it should appear blurred.

    I've attached a sample photo taken with a Panasonic GM1 and a kit lens. Not the same equipment but it gives you an idea. The base of the candle that is in focus was about a foot from the camera. The blurred camera in the background was about 3 feet away. The lens was set to max zoom which was 32mm for the kit lens with an aperture of 5.6.

    Test image by W B, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016
  10. bomo

    bomo Mu-43 Regular

    95
    May 7, 2014
    Hudson Valley, New York
    Wayne
    In the menu system, you should have the noise reduction option set to AUTO. This will invoke noise reduction only when necessary (very long shutter speeds) typically used when shooting on a tripod. For normal hand held shots, no noise reduction is required.

    I typically shoot in Program mode and use Aperture or Shutter mode only when looking for a certain effect. In these modes, you can use exposure compensation to change exposure on the fly and you will see the effects in the EVF/LCD.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. hyy

    hyy Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Apr 18, 2016
    thanks for the tips. will try with my camera once i get home. so it is impossible to take a portrait/full body of a person with blurry background with kit lens since i have to be very close and my aperture is not wide enough?

    also in olympus is there any option to show in the camera that my settings iscurrently over/under expose and the image taken will not be the same?

    thank you for your patience n help.
     
  12. algold

    algold Mu-43 Regular

    29
    Apr 8, 2016
    Alex
    even with your kit lens you can shoot portraits with a blurred b/g. Indoors it will be tricky, but possible if you have enough room, outdoors it will be easier to achieve. You need to be quite close to a person with a good distance to the b/g. Headshots are easier, full body shots need more distance for blurring the b/g. And shoot wide open with f/5.6 at the long end of your zoom.
    Depending on the shooting mode you will see blinking shutter speed or aperture values with a gross over/underexposure.
     
  13. hyy

    hyy Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Apr 18, 2016
    i am using a-mode. everytime i change any value, apeture or exposure,to max or min. nothing is blinking.

    will try your advise for outdoor once i have the chance.
     
  14. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    Another thing very important for the background blur is the distance of the background itself from the subject, from about 50-100 meters and over behind the subject is where you get the maximum blur (10-20 meters as a minimum). This means outdoor of course.

    A full body portrait with blurry background is hard for about any lens on any camera, then it really depends on how much blur you are looking for. As you say, to get the whole body you need to go very far or to use a wide lens and these two things both work against the background blur. So it is better to try with an headshot or a medium shot or with a sitting subject.
    To get a really blurry background you need a "long" fast prime. For example the Oly 45/1.8 or even the small 40-150 zoom at 150mm with a distant background. But before buying other lens I'd try to find the limits of your current gear.

    For your other question you need to understand the "exposure triangle" first. There are several articles and videos about this, it's worth spending some time on this. You need to look for three values: aperture, shutter speed and ISO and you do not have complete freedom in choosing these if you want a properly exposed, non blurry picture. So the first thing to do is to check these three values during the shot and when you review the pictures.

    The EVF will do it's best to show you what you will get, and will show blinking numbers warnings, etc. but if the values are too off for the current light you'll get something different. Then you can also muddy the waters with the Exposure compensation (the +/- bar in the middle bottom), maybe forgotten there from a previous attempt.
     
  15. hyy

    hyy Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Apr 18, 2016
    tried playing with the manual mode. set my dial to fn and shutter speed.
    whenever i adjust my aperture, i can see clearly that the lcd and vf is getting darker. same goes to whenadjusting shutter speed.

    i thought changing the f.no will get a more blurry/clearer image and not darker/brighter?

    also, i dont see a 1/125 or any shutter numbers in my screen. the only numbers that change is the EV and x", a number with " on the right.

    is it suppose to work this way? how do i know i have a fast or low shutter speed?
     
  16. bomo

    bomo Mu-43 Regular

    95
    May 7, 2014
    Hudson Valley, New York
    Wayne
    As you can see from the responses, you need to take some time to learn your camera and get some basic knowledge of exposure and how the combination of shutter/aperture/ISO effects the final image. You can get a blurred background with a full body shot even with the kit lens, but you need to work at it. Many combinations of camera to subject and subject to background distances will make it a challenge. In some instances it just will not be possible given the constraints you are working with. In the M43 world, the 45mm f1.8 lens is considered a great portrait lens. But you will be dealing with a 35mm equivalent focal length of 90mm so it may preclude getting a full body shot if your distances are too constrained.

    You really need to spend some time with the manual to learn the camera and check out some other resources for basic photography information. The linked video gives some basics on the exposure triangle.

     
  17. c5karl

    c5karl Mu-43 Regular

    144
    May 31, 2011
    Fairfax, Va., USA
    Before digging into the owner's manual, which explains the settings but not what they're used for, you might want to consider a good book on the principles of photography and how they apply to a digital camera.

    Bryan Peterson's Understanding Exposure is very approachable and assumes no previous knowledge -- but also has enough detail to keep you learning more about photography and your camera for quite some time.

    Understanding Exposure, 3rd Edition: How to Shoot Great Photographs with Any Camera: Bryan Peterson: 0884798534707: Amazon.com: Books
     
  18. CWRailman

    CWRailman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    564
    Jun 2, 2015
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Denny
    From your original post with the camera set to f22 it sounds like each shot was a long exposure which would result in a long time to write the data to the card and if it was hand held would produce a blurred image. For indoor shots, as a starting point, expect to be around f2.8 - f4 with a shutter speed of around 1/30 - 1/60 at ISO 1600.

    I always suggest to folks getting into photography or getting familiar with a new camera, that they start out with all the settings set to MANUAL. This is also how it is taught in every photography class.

    Working indoors under normal room light, with everything, ISO, Shutter Speed, Aperture (except focus which can stay in auto mode) set to manual, set your aperture to f2.8 –f4 or whatever you have that is close to that. Set the shutter speed to 1/30 and the ISO to 100-200. It is best to do such tests while sitting down. Aim at something and take a photo, then increase the ISO one step at a time while aiming at the same item and take another photo and do so at every ISO all the way to 3200. Keep reviewing the shot image on your LCD screen. At some point you will see an image that is close to acceptable. Like I said if indoors that will be around ISO 1600 with the image shot at ISO 200 being really dark and the one at 3200 a bit overexposed.

    Next go back to ISO 1600 and with the camera manually set to that ISO adjust the aperture and see what you get at every aperture setting from 2.8 or whatever is you largest opening till you get to f16 or f22 whichever is the smallest opening. This will demonstrate what changing the aperture does to the photo. Now without changing that ISO setting, go back to your f2.8 or whatever the largest you have and for the next experiment you are going to increase the shutter speed one adjustment at a time starting at 1/30 and going up to 4000 and see how that impacts the image.

    Once you see how these settings impact your image you will start to understand how your camera works. There is not just one setting to do what you want to accomplish and that is where years of experimenting which results in experience comes in. At some point you will want to maintain a preset aperture to control focus and depth of field so you will use the A mode. At other times you may want to control the shutter speed to blur or stop action and yet at other times you may want to get the highest quality lowest amount of noise in the image possible so controlling the ISO will be of the most importance to you.

    However, the other option, which I see way to many shooters do, is to just set everything to automatic and use the camera as an expensive PHD camera. I’ve seen some very expensive cameras used in that manner because the owner did not take the time to learn the basics of photography.

    As has already been suggested, you should spend time reading the camera manual and getting familiar with the basic components of the camera and then go to Youtube and watch some of the videos demonstrating the features of that camera. If this is your first serious camera, it will take you a few evenings to get through the manual and it does require some patience. You're not going to become another Ansel Adams over night.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016
  19. hyy

    hyy Mu-43 Rookie

    20
    Apr 18, 2016
    i was on manual, but i cant find any shutter speed value in my lcd. the only value that change is EV.

    thanks all for the guidance. guess i was too quick to want to know-it-all. i will definately spend some time reading the manual and book by c5karl.

    will try your advise too cwrailman, thank you.

    thanks bomo for your many replies and knowledge will look at the video.
     
  20. ChrisN

    ChrisN Mu-43 Regular

    51
    Jul 13, 2015
    The "number with [quotation mark] on the right" is your shutter speed. The quotation mark denotes shutter speeds in seconds .

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Mu-43 mobile app