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Olympus 75-300, Panasonic 100-300, or adapted legacy prime

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by rklepper, Mar 10, 2013.

  1. rklepper

    rklepper Mu-43 Top Veteran

    733
    Dec 19, 2012
    Iowa, USA
    Robert
    I have really been struggling with this decision. I need one of these and now with the olympus coming out soon, it is time. The Panasonic can have a tripod ring and not sure about the olympus.

    What would you do?

    What should I do?
     
  2. Jonathan F/2

    Jonathan F/2 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 10, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    If you have a Panasonic body or an Olympus body that's not an E-M5, I'd get the 100-300. If you have the E-M5, the new 75-300 should be nice.
     
  3. steve barnett

    steve barnett New to Mu-43

    4
    Mar 10, 2013
    long lens choice

    If you have a G5 or GH3 get the 100-300. IS is at times very helpful. Stick to AFS.

    If you have a EM5 get the 75-300, as it has a much faster autofocus than the 100-300, which makes up for the slower action of the camera than the G5 or GH3.

    AFC works best with the combination G5 + 75-300, but you don't have IBIS or IS and will not easily get a critically sharp result (stop down!). It also works some of the time with the EM5 + 75-300 combination with very sharp results (IBIS is really effective on the EM5).

    Don't worry about a tripod ring, it's completely unnecessary with these light and physically unimposing lenses.

    A legacy lens will work very well with the EM5 due to the excellence of IBIS. Something like the Nikon IFED 400/5.6 or the Leitz 400/6.8 will work better than it ever did in film days at a much longer effective length, handheld. this doesn't replace the native lens but strongly supplements it.
     
  4. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    rklepper, could you tell us what kind of shooting/subject you hope to be using a long tele for?
     
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  5. rklepper

    rklepper Mu-43 Top Veteran

    733
    Dec 19, 2012
    Iowa, USA
    Robert
    Grizzly bears, eagles, anything that I find interesting. No sports as my kids are now out of school. I am traveling a lot which is why I went with this system in the first place. I look at whatever I do now as a stop gap measure. None of these options appeal to me completely, but are the only real options.

    Thanks

     
  6. rklepper

    rklepper Mu-43 Top Veteran

    733
    Dec 19, 2012
    Iowa, USA
    Robert
    Oh and what I have right now is the EM5 and the Panasonic 12-35 and 35-100. Great lenses, but very limited on the long end.

    Sorry I should have included that.
     
  7. riverr02

    riverr02 Mu-43 Veteran

    258
    May 2, 2011
    New York
    Rafael
    As far as I know, there haven't been any major reviews of the NEW O75-300 lens, so to say it's got faster AF is not guaranteed. If you can wait, I'd do so until several reviews are out, especially since the O75-300 is more expensive and slower (aperture-wise) than the P100-300 AND doesn't include OIS for use on Panny bodies (including for resale). The aperture of 6.7 in particular for the long end is already on the edge where diffraction starts to rear itself. All that said, if the reviews describe a lighter lens with better IQ and faster AF than the P100-300, then maybe the price differential and lack of OIS would be offset by the benefits.
     
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  8. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Bob
    If you don't want to wait then I would certainly reccomend the 100-300. I have been very pleased with mine and the built in OIS makes it easier to sell later if something faster/better comes along.
     
  9. Jonathan F/2

    Jonathan F/2 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 10, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    Unless you really need the 300, I'd also recommend the 45-175 X lens. End-to-end it's the sharpest consumer telephoto lens I've used. It's also very compact, has a fixed length barrel and very good contrast/low CA.
     
  10. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    I think I'd start with a legacy prime. Perhaps a Canon FD 300 f/4?
     
  11. juangrande

    juangrande Mu-43 Top Veteran

    805
    Dec 2, 2012
    COLORADO
    Grizzly bears not in a zoo, you might want some reach! 400 f5.6
     
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  12. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    rkeppler, I've faced these same decisions, photographed grizz @<50' (w/ bear spray at my side) & shot numerous large birds. Recently finished a wonderful tropical trip w/ EM5 & 6 lenses. On that trip, used O75-300 70% of the time & @ 300mm 90%. Another 20% of shots were divided between P45 macro (your 2 pana lenses are great but not much close focus) & O9-18. Everything else was 5%

    The pana & oly 300 zooms seem to be about equal IQ & both have 1.5m close focus - but I wanted closer several times & have now bought extension tubes. Some users on this forum have found the OIS on the P300 works a bit better than IBIS in the EM5. The O300 is reported to have faster AF but it doesn't really matter. Neither the IS nor CDAF work all that well @ 300mm - they help but to get critically sharp IQ, ALWAYS use a mono/tri pod & manual focus except in perfect?? conditions. For me the added cost of the O300 was neutralized because I already had several 58mm filters.

    I have the EM5 set up w/ the smallest AF focus target, the focus peaking hack described elsewhere on this forum & a button to activate 5x view mag.

    If your travels allow you the time to get close to the critters, getting out to 300mmm or more is less essential. If you are traveling w/ others and need to keep moving, 300mm will often not be enough cause you can't get close enough.

    All the legacy long-teles are big & heavy. Few are really sharp & fewer still will focus close. I own a couple but find them too soft. The large size does reduce shake but also makes them slower to use especially the manual aperture. You'll be manual focusing even w/ the native lens anyway so that's not an issue. The Canon FD 300 is good but min. focus is just under 3m. The Nikon ED-IF 300mm F4 is terrific, still sharp w/ a 1.4x TC & will focus to 1.5m. But it is 51oz & big $$.

    All that said, I'll buy a 400mm close focusing prime one day perhaps the Sigma apo macro.

    Good luck!
     
    • Like Like x 3
  13. rklepper

    rklepper Mu-43 Top Veteran

    733
    Dec 19, 2012
    Iowa, USA
    Robert
    Thanks. Since most have not retired most of my travels are alone to visit friends. Plenty of time for mono- tripod.

    I do have 58mm filters too.

    Decisions, decisions.

    Ed


     
  14. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    Lucky you have the opportunity to concentrate on your photography while traveling.

    The current Pop Photo has a good section on wildlife photography you might check out.

    My tropical trip had a very high portion of small & very small subjects. That pushed the close focus issue. Also mostly I shot in deep forest so mono/tripod was required. A different location would present completely different conditions. So you might think about where you want to go on your next few trips.

    Big critters in AK or Yellowstone could favor say the 4/3 50-200mm f2.8-3.5. But you'd still want to have a 300 or 400 for hard to approach fox or wolf. Close focus would rarely be an issue. Long primes almost always have better boken than long zooms. The 50-200 is really sharp but not so nice boken.

    Mono/tripods slow you & make it harder to get very low positions. Don't use one if lighting is good enough to shoot at 1/500 & iso 400.

    Also consider buying a camo-smock. They are light enough to part of what you carry in your day pack.
     
  15. dave92029

    dave92029 Mu-43 Regular

    157
    May 7, 2010
    Escondido, CA
    standing up


    I don't know if it's my age or my physical condition, But I use a Monopod all the time with my E-M5 / 100-300mm combo.

    The monopod serves several purposes:
    a) stabilizes the photo equipment
    b) acts as a walking stick as I walk around
    c) acts as support, and makes it much easier for me to stand after kneeling down! :wink:
     
  16. fsuscotphoto

    fsuscotphoto Mu-43 Top Veteran

    819
    Feb 15, 2013
    St. Cloud, FL
    Ron
    Carrying a long lens, over 300mm at APS-C without at least a monopod is a recipe for blur in my hands. If I were to get a 75-300, even if very light, I would use the monopod.
     
  17. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    Sounds like i should say more about my recommendation to leave the pods behind. Mobility is frequently critical to success in wildlife photography. If you've got the light, ditch the pod in favor of mobility.

    Most of the time in the tropical forest, I had no choice but to use a pod. And I missed plenty of shots as a result while adjusting the pod to get into another position.

    Critters are very active & best shot from their level. Pods slow you getting to their level or getting past obstructions to get closer.

    But it takes lots of practice developing soft shutter release technique so you don't shake the camera even on a pod while trying to capture the fleeting moment. That's why I suggested 1/500th as the slowest speed to consider w/ 300s.
     
  18. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    BTW, at my age hand holding is much harder than it was 40 yrs ago too.

    But lots of practice on test shots has helped me improve - I recommend it.

    I get really excited when something starts to come together w/ a critter & fall back into slamming the shutter button down to catch the moment. So I remind myself of my well practiced soft shutter press & breath control.

    Some find that the 1/8 sec Anti-shock setting helps reduce camera shake - doesn't help me but try it, maybe it will work for you.
     
  19. dave92029

    dave92029 Mu-43 Regular

    157
    May 7, 2010
    Escondido, CA
    Agree...that is why I carry a carbon fiber mono"Pod". Very light weight, and if I need to react to a photo opportunity quickly, I just lift the camera and shoot. The mono"pod" plus the E-M5 w/100-300mm really doesn't weigh that much.

    My really sharp images have All been when I use my mono"pod". The sabilization on the OMD is really good but 300mm on a M43 really needs a mono"pod" imho.
     
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  20. zapatista

    zapatista Mu-43 Top Veteran

    668
    Mar 19, 2012
    Denver, Colorado, USA
    Mike
    What Dave said here...Monopod+Old heavy lens with tripod collar=more stability than IS for me. I use an old 85-300mm Canon FD. I would love to get rid of it for smaller auto focusing glass that produced better files.