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Olympus 75-300 or Panasonic 100-300 on E-M10, 3 axis IBIS vs Mega OIS

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by davidzvi, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    Based on reviews it seems image quality is almost down to sample variations between the 75-300 and 100-300. And it's easy to say the Panasonic on a Panasonic body and the Olympus on a E-M1/E-M5/E-P5 with the 5 axis IBIS.

    But I had a 45-200 on my E-M10 for a little while and it seemed real close, 3 axis vs Mega OIS. To the point were even slight subject movement, not using a tripod, anything could just as easily be why one shot looked better than another. There are several threads on 5 axis versus Mega and Power OIS, but not much that I see on the 3 axis.

    Any idea which would be better?
     
  2. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    I have the 75-300 MKII and there is no difference in IBIS performance between my E-M1, E-M10 & E-M5. The IBIS performance isn't all that great either. To get consistent, critically sharp images (300mm) requires shutter speeds above 1/1000 sec. Since the lens is only f6.7 @ 300mm, it's a bright sunny lens. I wouldn't be surprised if OIS was better. I have the 12-32 lens and I find OIS more effective than IBIS. A plus with the E-M10 is that it can be configured to use either IS method as the default.
     
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  3. TassieFig

    TassieFig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    534
    Oct 28, 2013
    Tasmania, Australia
    I disagree. I just got the 75-300 and I'm practicing handhold shooting with this at different speeds at 300mm. I can get pretty consistent sharp results at 1/320 with E-M5 IBIS (compared to tripod shots). At 1/250 I get about 50% of them sharp. Granted, this is when I have time to concentrate on shooting static objects but without bracing against anything. And I know I get a quite shaky after about 1.5 seconds...For anyone with a steady hand and some good techniques, you can get great results. I have no experience with the other cameras or the 100-300 so can't say anything about that.
     
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  4. ManofKent

    ManofKent Hopefully still learning

    789
    Dec 26, 2014
    Faversham, Kent, UK
    Richard
    Generalizing IBIS has an edge at short focal lengths but at long focal lengths OIS is more effective.The point at which the effectiveness swaps depends on the system used, but with those sort of focal lengths OIS is almost certainly going to have the edge. Having said that at longer focal lengths no stabilization system is that great - the movements are so magnified. Fast shutter speeds and good technique are the big things to focus on.
     
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  5. sdb123

    sdb123 Mu-43 Veteran

    249
    Jul 25, 2014
    Northants, UK
    Steve
    As above, technique and fast-enough shutter speeds. I have an E-M10 and use the 100-300mm....at the longest end, I tend to use OIS, but there's really not much in it. As for 3 vs 5 axis IBIS, from all I've read the additional axis are utilised for video. Either way, either system should enable you to get more handheld keepers than without but technique is king.
     
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  6. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    Personally I wouldn't have any worries about 1/320th in normal usage, however it still remains a daylight only lens.

    bearhead.
    bearheadcrop.
    f/8, ISO 400, 1/80th of a second @ 300mm using an E-M1 hand held.
    Metadata is present on the 100% crop, no extra sharpening in PS however normal sharpening in adobe RAW. It's not tack sharp, however I would suggest that it's generally the level of performance I expect from my copy regardless of shutter speed and if you're looking that close you're missing the point. The picture before it was just as sharp, however I had front focused (the tree in front of the bear was sharp, and the bear was out of focus), in the picture after it the bear had started to move so it had motion blur.

    I haven't used the 100-300mm however the 70-300mm is a decent performer for what I use it for (it could never compare to a prime or high end zoom in sharpness however I consider it a good small secondary lens that can hide in the corner of my bag if I desire to reach out and touch something), the IBIS functions as advertised and better than I expect the majority of the time (this body was sent back to Olympus because of errors at one specific focal length(35mm) however I don't know if they actually changed anything, the repair notes say no changes made).


    I can show dozens of examples of what I would call sharp images, however it doesn't really matter what people on the internet can show. I would suggest that either lens would be a fantastic choice and that the emphasis should be which becomes available at a good price rather than which between the two is more stable/sharper/whatever metric you want to use. The difference between the two is probably not measurable in real world use (did you have a cup of coffee earlier in the day? something minor like that is going to introduce more of a difference in real world use).
     
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  7. Halaking

    Halaking Mu-43 Top Veteran

    667
    Dec 17, 2012
    Los Angeles
    Morris
    I have EM5 and Gx7, I think 5 AXIS IBIS is better on slower shutter speed, but I think the GX7's OIS + electronic shutter is little sharper.
     
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  8. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Another issue with long lenses is IS on at long focal lengths. The EM5 can provide a stabilized view. I don't know about the EM10, but at 300mm with a non-stabilized view -- that's just a headache.
     
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  9. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    Electronic shutter would give rolling shutter artifacts if there were any movement... since it takes something like 1/30th to cover the whole sensor?
     
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  10. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    OIS can provide a stabilized view... which is why the view on canikon DSLR's can be stabilized and the E-series 4/3 cameras could not.
     
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  11. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    The E-M10 does as well.

    Thanks for all the comments so far. Both lenses seem to be in the 300-400 range with the Pan being a little less. So if I base it mainly on that then the Panasonic wins I guess. I also expect it would be used more in the 200-300 end then in the 100-200 range.

    I had the 45-200, it was OK. I had the Oly 40-150 R. Again OK but a little short so I would hit the converter more often. The Digital Tele Converter on the Olympus bodies isn't too bad, certainly a world of difference from the old digital zoom on P&S cameras of years past. I considered getting the 45-175 and continuing to to do that. It would be cheaper, much smaller, and it has the Power OIS which is suppose to be better than the Mega OIS. The 45-175 would have the advantage of being able to be used on my table top tripod. I could sit it on my desk aimed at the feeders out side and just touch the screen to fire (darn Cardenal moves every time I pick up my camera).
     
  12. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    While the other lenses are larger, I suspect they're still light enough that you can use a small gorilla pod or something like that without too many troubles(especially sans lens hood).

    With a few other lenses for scale (Samyang 7.5 on left, 12-40mm f2.8 and 45mm f1.8 on the right).
    75300c.

    75300c2.
    Inside a 35-100mm f2.0 lens hood for scale... (OK, that one's more for giggles).

    Without going out to the car to get a second body I can only take a picture with it mounted using a camera phone...
    76300cem1.
    They say camera phones are replacing large clunky cameras... although I can't see mine achieving it any time soon :smile:
     
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  13. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    I use camerasize.com to check scale. They don't have all the lens option, but they do have a lot.

    The table top one I have has a 2.2 pound limit but balance is a bigger issue than total weight. Right now I think I'm leaning toward the Panasonic 100-300. There is also a lens collar available for it, another plus.
     
  14. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    The online size things are good. I just figured I would offer a few pictures just in case, I don't have all the lens options either :smile:

    The 75-300 balances on the groove on front of the zoom collar/grip when fully extended and 1/3rd back from the groove along the collar/grip when fully collapsed so it is a pretty front heavy lens(without lens hood, the lens hood skews it even further), you're right that the lens collar is the real winner here.
     
  15. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Shoot a resolution target hand holding, then mount the camera on a solid tripod, shoot the target again and see if they are equally sharp. The bear shots are soft. They may be good enough for what you use your images for, but not for the prints I make.
     
  16. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    I would agree it's soft.

    BUT, but 600mm angle of view at 1/80?!?!?

    And that kind of shot is really all I'm looking for out of this lens. Hence why I also have been thinking of the 45-175 and just continuing to use the digital converter.
     
  17. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    For me, soft is soft and the shot isn't useable. The 75-300 worked okay for an air show where I could keep the shutter speed at 1/1600 or faster. It may also be good for some wild life shots on a bright day.

    I also ordered a 45-175 and it should be here next week. I'm taking a trip in a few months where a longish light lens will be handy for some shots.
     
  18. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    Not owning a resolution target and never having printed one to be sold I cannot say if my shots of resolution targets would be as sharp as yours, I would agree that pictures of said target would be sharper taken with a tripod and I'm sure the clients you sell pictures of resolution targets to would thank you for use of a tripod.

    The picture in question was perfectly adequate for the output it was used for, viewing it at a pixel level on screen is akin to taking a loupe to a smaller print (8x10) or looking from a foot on a larger (42" etc) and is far greater scrutiny than would be afforded it by normal viewers.
     
  19. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    Another thing just occurred to me, in future you may change to a Panasonic body which may not have IBIS - which is another point in the Panasonic's favor.
     
  20. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    While that may be possible I'm much more of a fan of the Olympus bodies. I had a GX1 and did not really like the interface (buttons, q-menu, etc.)