Showcase Olympus 75-300 f/4.8-6.7 II

Darmok N Jalad

Temba, his aperture wide
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What is this zoom-to-focus feature - tell me more!
On Olympus cameras, there is a “Magnify” option you can set to the custom buttons. I use the front button on my E-M5iii, and when I tap it, it zooms to the focus square, and the front dial allows you to increase the magnification up to 14x. Whatever is in this Magnify area is what the camera will focus on, so you can use it to find your focus spot. It requires a very steady hand at 300mm, but if you can manage, it can really help you nail the focus on the right spot. In this case, the eye of the animal is what I zoom to, and when it looks sharp, I hit the shutter. I use silent shutter with the 75-300 to reduce the potential for shutter shock.
 

Quadna71

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Delaware, USA
On Olympus cameras, there is a “Magnify” option you can set to the custom buttons. I use the front button on my E-M5iii, and when I tap it, it zooms to the focus square, and the front dial allows you to increase the magnification up to 14x. Whatever is in this Magnify area is what the camera will focus on, so you can use it to find your focus spot. It requires a very steady hand at 300mm, but if you can manage, it can really help you nail the focus on the right spot. In this case, the eye of the animal is what I zoom to, and when it looks sharp, I hit the shutter. I use silent shutter with the 75-300 to reduce the potential for shutter shock.
Ah, okay. Yes, I have a button programmed on my em1iii for just that reason. I used it for all the pictures I took yesterday morning from work while using a tripod. When you first mentioned it for some reason I thought it was a technique or trick that involve a feature of the lens.
 

Darmok N Jalad

Temba, his aperture wide
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More squirrels. Well, this is just one squirrel.

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Darmok N Jalad

Temba, his aperture wide
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While this is not a squirrel, this raptor was on the hunt in my backyard and landed in the bushes. Not kidding, one of the resident squirrels had nothing of it, and actually attacked this hawk twice until it flew off. I've never seen anything like it before. I guess maybe the squirrel had a nest nearby?
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John King

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John ...
It does seem to get the job done. I think I've figured out how to shoot with it better too. :D
I think that latter comment is extremely pertinent, mate.

There are good reasons why 'standard' FLs are 12 to 150 mm. These FLs don't really require special techniques to get acceptable results from them, although some of us need to concentrate more than others do to get acceptable results as we approach those end limits.

The UWAs and long telephotos definitely require careful attention to technique, and some level of ability.

My own ability to handhold at over 200mm has deteriorated noticeably over the last ten years, so I have to pay particular attention to my technique nowadays. Routinely chimping at 7x (E-M1 MkI) and 5x (E-M1 MkII) helps a lot too ... ;) :rofl: .

These magnifications are roughly equivalent to an A2 print.
 

Darmok N Jalad

Temba, his aperture wide
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A couple birds in flight: ;)
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Edit:
The forum keeps nuking the brown in the plane photo. A close-in crop reveals it's a UPS cargo plane, though it's still bluish. It was not a super clear day.
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Darmok N Jalad

Temba, his aperture wide
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Tanagra (not really)
Tried to get a HR shot of the moon with this lens. My tripod isn't exactly the most stable thing.
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JLGF1

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Tried to get a HR shot of the moon with this lens. My tripod isn't exactly the most stable thing.

I was intrigued with the pic and ran it through an AI PP filter that tries to improve on focus...before/after.

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Darmok N Jalad

Temba, his aperture wide
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oggie

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Jeff Ogden
Hi, I'm new to this forum but I have lurked from time to time and found excellent advice. I use an OMD EM1 mk 1 as my travel camera but since there isn't much traveling going on these days I have begun to shoot birds in the back garden. I have a Canon FF and crop bodies and have been shooting a kit 70-300 on the crop body with pretty good results but wanted some additional reach. I remembered the 2x crop factor with the m43 and read up on the many birding/wildlife posts on this site. Since I have the mark 1 camera I just wanted to try out a longer lens without breaking the bank. I narrowed it down to the PL 100-400 and the Olympus 75-300. I was set to buy a second hand copy of the PL, but read about more than a few issues with the mount on an Olympus body. B&H had a $150 discount on the 75-300 so I decided to give it a go. I just received the lens a couple days ago and I've taken a few shots. So far, I am pretty impressed. I'm a landscape shooter at heart and have no experience shooting at 600mm equivalent and there is indeed a technique to learn.

I am attaching a couple of shots. Both are hand held, one at 300mm the other at 140mm. The subject was approximately 20 feet away. Both are jpegs very lightly processed on my phone--no sharpening or noise reduction applied. The one on the feeder is 100% crop (square) and the one in the tree is cropped in just slightly. I really am impressed with the image quality and looking forward to digging in to some raw files to see what I can manage. I did take these hand held, but braced my elbows on a railing. I'm not sure I could shoot this at 250-300mm without some sort of support. I'm not really after BIF at this point, so this should keep me busy for a while. Thanks to all who have posted and inspired me to get to this point. Cheers, Jeff
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Joined
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Hi, I'm new to this forum but I have lurked from time to time and found excellent advice. I use an OMD EM1 mk 1 as my travel camera but since there isn't much traveling going on these days I have begun to shoot birds in the back garden. I have a Canon FF and crop bodies and have been shooting a kit 70-300 on the crop body with pretty good results but wanted some additional reach. I remembered the 2x crop factor with the m43 and read up on the many birding/wildlife posts on this site. Since I have the mark 1 camera I just wanted to try out a longer lens without breaking the bank. I narrowed it down to the PL 100-400 and the Olympus 75-300. I was set to buy a second hand copy of the PL, but read about more than a few issues with the mount on an Olympus body. B&H had a $150 discount on the 75-300 so I decided to give it a go. I just received the lens a couple days ago and I've taken a few shots. So far, I am pretty impressed. I'm a landscape shooter at heart and have no experience shooting at 600mm equivalent and there is indeed a technique to learn.

I am attaching a couple of shots. Both are hand held, one at 300mm the other at 140mm. The subject was approximately 20 feet away. Both are jpegs very lightly processed on my phone--no sharpening or noise reduction applied. The one on the feeder is 100% crop (square) and the one in the tree is cropped in just slightly. I really am impressed with the image quality and looking forward to digging in to some raw files to see what I can manage. I did take these hand held, but braced my elbows on a railing. I'm not sure I could shoot this at 250-300mm without some sort of support. I'm not really after BIF at this point, so this should keep me busy for a while. Thanks to all who have posted and inspired me to get to this point. Cheers, Jeff View attachment 872849 View attachment 872850
Jeff welcome.
You've no doubt read up and made a choice which I'm sure you won't be disappointed with.
As an owner of both lenses I can attest to the brilliance of both and the misery of both.
Don't be put off when things look mediocre. It happens.
Play with the different settings, particularly the f no.
I've got used to hand holding and never use a tripod. It grows on you and is so liberating. I appreciate not all can do that.
Keep them coming and enjoy your acquisition.
 

Phocal

Mu-43 Legend
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
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Mars
Hi, I'm new to this forum but I have lurked from time to time and found excellent advice. I use an OMD EM1 mk 1 as my travel camera but since there isn't much traveling going on these days I have begun to shoot birds in the back garden. I have a Canon FF and crop bodies and have been shooting a kit 70-300 on the crop body with pretty good results but wanted some additional reach. I remembered the 2x crop factor with the m43 and read up on the many birding/wildlife posts on this site. Since I have the mark 1 camera I just wanted to try out a longer lens without breaking the bank. I narrowed it down to the PL 100-400 and the Olympus 75-300. I was set to buy a second hand copy of the PL, but read about more than a few issues with the mount on an Olympus body. B&H had a $150 discount on the 75-300 so I decided to give it a go. I just received the lens a couple days ago and I've taken a few shots. So far, I am pretty impressed. I'm a landscape shooter at heart and have no experience shooting at 600mm equivalent and there is indeed a technique to learn.

I am attaching a couple of shots. Both are hand held, one at 300mm the other at 140mm. The subject was approximately 20 feet away. Both are jpegs very lightly processed on my phone--no sharpening or noise reduction applied. The one on the feeder is 100% crop (square) and the one in the tree is cropped in just slightly. I really am impressed with the image quality and looking forward to digging in to some raw files to see what I can manage. I did take these hand held, but braced my elbows on a railing. I'm not sure I could shoot this at 250-300mm without some sort of support. I'm not really after BIF at this point, so this should keep me busy for a while. Thanks to all who have posted and inspired me to get to this point. Cheers, Jeff View attachment 872849 View attachment 872850

It really is a good lens. Here is a comparison I did between the 75-300 and 300/4, and here is one between the 75-300, 50-200 SWD w/ EC-14 and 300/4. I carry it with me on my daily bike rides because I never know what I will run into while riding even local bike paths through the city.

Any questions don't hesitate to ask.

Phocal
 
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