Olympus 50-200 on E-PL5

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by jmrf, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. jmrf

    jmrf New to Mu-43

    Feb 2, 2013
    I recently bought one of these on e-bay after reading many highly positive reviews. Consensus seemed to be that it is very sharp. I however can't seem to get anything but mediocre shots. Now, I'm no pro but I have been known to take a few good pictures. I'm not saying this can't be my fault but I expected to be able to take some good shots and have only failed. They seem dull and lifeless. Sharpness is Ok but not praiseworthy. Could it be the lens? Does anyone else use this combo? How does it work for you? Thanks.
  2. MAubrey

    MAubrey Photographer

    Jul 9, 2012
    Bellingham, WA
    Real Name:
    Mike Aubrey
    I haven't used the lens on the E-PL5, but I've enjoyed it on the OM-D. Are you using the original version or the SWD version? I can't speak for the former, but the SWD version pretty consistently misses focus, so much so that I only shoot it in manual focus mode. It's too much of a hassle otherwise. If I were to guess anything, I'd bet that the lack of sharpness if simply a result of images being out of focus.

    Maybe upload a couple images, too. That might help us decipher the problem.
  3. BarefootPilgrim

    BarefootPilgrim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Dec 23, 2009
    Westchester, IL
    Real Name:
    I've used the older, non-SWD version of this lens on several Olympus DSLR and mirrorless cameras including the E-PL2, E-PM1 and the E-M5 always with stunning results.

    On mirrorless bodies it is slow to focus and will hunt occasionally, but most of the time it will lock on to something in your shot. It may not always be the element you want it to lock onto, though. Best way to use it (for me) is as a manual focus lens. I'm told that the older version is better at AF on mirrorless bodies than the SWD version is, but don't have any first-hand experience comparing the two.

    I also find that, because it's such a heavy sucker, I need to use it with good support from a monopod or tripod. I've used it hand-held occasionally, but when I do, I'm very conscious to keep the shutter speed at least twice as fast as the focal-length-reciprocal.

    As Mike suggested, showing us some of the images you're getting could be helpful.
  4. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Real Name:
    Unless you've got examples with another telephoto lens under similar conditions that look good, most likely the problem is not the lens. Anything that would impact image quality in the fashion would be immediately visible just by looking at the lens.

    One problem with long telephotos, particularly for landscapes, is haze. Pollution and moisture make it very hard to get crisp shots at longer distances. Another problem is slightly missed focus where the subject isn't completely out-of-focus but will seem a little blurred - and AF with the 50-200 on m4/3 does miss rather frequently.