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Olympus 45mm filter flare ghosting

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by Toddster, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. Toddster

    Toddster Mu-43 Veteran

    205
    Aug 7, 2013
    Florida
    Todd Cleaver
    I just received my O45 1.8, this is truly a beautiful lens. The question that I have for the many of you that use this lens has to do with attaching a UV filter. I prefer to keep a decent (Hoya HMC) filter on my lenses. I know that any filter ads to the risk of ghosting but, in general, I don't have much of a problem with my other lenses. On this lens however the filter pics up the reflection of strong light sources bouncing off of the sensor as though it was an uncoated cheepy filter.

    Is this behavior a symptom of a fast lens? (I don't have anything else this fast). Or maybe a symptom of this specific lens? Would a better filter help or is this lens best left without a filter?

    Any advice from owners of this lens will be much appreciated.

    Todd
     
  2. Timmy

    Timmy Mu-43 Regular

    110
    Dec 3, 2013
    Wiltshire - UK
    I have a similar issue with my 45mm & hoya UV filter - sometimes bright lights indoors seem to ghost across the image. I'd be interested to know if this is normal.
     
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  3. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    When I bought my PL25 and O45 used they both had Hoya Slim HMC UV(c)s in them. I found they both caused internal reflections with strong light sources so I stopped using the filters.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    I use only B+W MRC filters and have no internal reflections.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. verbatimium

    verbatimium Mu-43 Veteran

    204
    Jul 17, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario
    Martin
    Don't bother putting a cheap protective filter on a sub $300 lens like this. The lens is incredibly sharp but you are just are degrading the sharpness and introducing flare with a filter. Just buy a cheap JJC lens hood and that is all the protection you will ever need. I would say if you have a $600+ lens then it is worth protecting, but only with a really good filter.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. wei

    wei Mu-43 Rookie

    11
    Oct 24, 2013
    I found flare problem on most of my M4/3 lenses with UV filter on. Panasonic PZ 14-42mm pancake zoom with nano coating being the worst. Even with B+W MRC. The only lens doesn't have this problem is the old 14-45mm and the 20mm first version, strange.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    Same here.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. DoofClenas

    DoofClenas Who needs a Mirror!

    943
    Nov 9, 2012
    Traverse City, MI
    Clint
    Only notice it when shooting christmas lights close up...I removed it and bought the JJC hood.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    Those Hoya HMC filters are a pain to keep clean. They have a very obvious "tooth" to their coating.
    I dare you to put your finger print on it and try dearly to remove it.

    I find that the B+W UV0 MRC filters don't ghost - they're also much easier to keep clean.
    Also, the Nikon L37C series filters don't seem to have ghosting issues on most lenses.

    That said, if you are going to use a filter, it's often a good idea to still use the hood. The filter, since it creates an air-glass space can cause the lens to flare more easily without the hood.

    I use both filter and hood mainly because I'm a bit of a butter fingers, or sometimes my nephew grabs the lens and likes to put his fingers all over it. I even have a mildly chewed up Canon lens hood I use as a "decoy" because he finds its shape so fascinating!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    I recommend the B&W MRC filters as well, I have one on every lens.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. rstrader

    rstrader Mu-43 Regular

    96
    Apr 12, 2012
    Colorado Springs
    I have a multi coated Heliopan on mine and have never seen any flare or ghosting. Of course the filter is probably worth as much as the lens!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    Good advice. My 45mm has a screw on hood that almost never comes off.
     
  13. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    I just can't understand this thing about putting UV filters on to protect lenses. Anything you put in front of your lens will degrade the IQ to some extent - even an expensive B+W filter. If it was adding real protection, then it might be worth it; but unless you're shooting in dusty or corrosive spray environments (seaside), then a filter will probably make things worse.

    If you bash the lens into something hard, then chances are that you won't scratch the front element - it's actually pretty hard. Do the same with a filter and because the filter glass is fairly thin, there's a much higher chance that you'll break it. The result will be shards of broken glass being showered onto your lens - which stand a good chance of scratching it during removal. Then there's always the chance that the filter ring will deform during impact meaning it'll be jammed onto the lens causing further issues.

    A lens hood will likely offer more protection against bumps and what's more, it can only improve your IQ!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    I did tests with my B&W MRC filters with all of my lenses and not one suffered in any visible way because of the filter. I have to regularly clean the filters and would rather do that than clean the front element of the lens, regardless of how hard the coating may be and the MRC filters are optical glass and similarly coated anyway. I actually did break one filter when I dropped my Nikon 300mm and the front lens element was completely unharmed. It might not have been so without the filter, as the filter ring took most of the force and deformed before the lens front did. Also, I have been in situations where the filter has been spattered with sap and the like and to clean it you have needed copious quantities of water. With the B&W MRC filter, it's simply been a matter of repeated soaking and gentle wiping, and the MRC coating being hydrophobic, makes cleaning and drying a breeze. I would not go anywhere without the filters on my lenses.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  15. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    I've actually had this happen, and it wasn't the case. I know of many lenses that have extremely soft glass on their outward-facing elements.

    The whole point of the B+W MRC line is to augment the coating with a very very hard anti-scratch coating. I'm sure it's a compromise somehow, but however it may be, it's not something I can see.
    Hoya filters, on the other hand have been nothing but frustration because of the type of coatings they use. Their interference coating is very deep - once you get dirt of a finger print on them it's virtually impossible to clean them.

    I have a Zeiss lens that was bought for parts and to tinker with (it was a complete write-off) and the outer facing lens is so soft, you can scratch your initials into the front element with a chewed fingernail!