Showcase Olympus 300mm f/4 PRO

PeHa

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Skylark, MC-20 attached
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Davidof_CR

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Trying to capture the Supermoon, but there were always some obstacles.

I hope I did not overdo the vignetation ...

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Carbonman

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Is there a specific technique of holding these long lens when shooting handheld? Ie. normally my left hand is underneath the barrel and usually closer to the body than the lens hood. Would I get more stability with hand fire the out towards the end of the lens?
I put the tripod ring back on the 300mm. I rest the tripod plate on the palm of my left hand with my elbow tucked against my ribs. I push my head forward so my nose is braced against the (usually flipped in) LCD screen just below the EVF/LCD button. My left foot is forward and turned in slightly, right foot back at a 45 degree angle. This gives me a stable platform for the camera and lens, plus it's a position I can maintain for quite a while.
 

SteveAdler

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the near far nord, eh!
I put the tripod ring back on the 300mm. I rest the tripod plate on the palm of my left hand with my elbow tucked against my ribs. I push my head forward so my nose is braced against the (usually flipped in) LCD screen just below the EVF/LCD button. My left foot is forward and turned in slightly, right foot back at a 45 degree angle. This gives me a stable platform for the camera and lens, plus it's a position I can maintain for quite a while.
Thanks Graham @Carbonman
So if if I’ve got this right do you actually have the tripod plate resting on your left hand, and not any part of the lens itself? I currently have the tripod ring turned 90° to the left, and yes, it is kind of in the way there.
Left elbow tucked against your ribs?
Makes sense about the nose stabilizer! 😊 👃 📷
The footwork sounds similar to my own, something I do in windy conditions as well.

Btw... how are things in Vancouver. Sounds like your province has worked hard to keep things under control. We’re currently dealing with a lot of returning snowbirds here in Ontario so our numbers are spiking a bit, but for the most part people are doing their part to stay home except for essentials, and keeping a safe distance when they do have to go out. Hope they can keep this up so we can plank the curve and get back outside again.
 

Bristolero

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I spent an hour this morning standing on a rocky point near our home. After two years I finally decided to give the AF Limiter a work out (DUH!). So far it seems like I should have done this two years ago. Currently I'm enjoying that I can use a smaller focus point for more precision. Prior to using the limiter, when I used smaller point and it would wander off the target, I tended to have a harder time refocussing with the smaller focal array. With the focal range now much less, it returns to focus quicker. Probably not telling many of you anything new, but for simple minds like me......
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Davidof_CR

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I wish Olympus made setting the AF limits more user friendly. Why can´t we let the camera set the limits by pointing it at some subject in the desired distance ?

The distance that we input in the camera has actually nothing to do with the real distance (if you measured it exactly). In fact, there is a big difference.

There is one trick how to make the camera measure the distance - using PreMF you can read the virtual distance how the camera sees it and then you can set it yourself.
 

Davidof_CR

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Use the PreMF to "measure" a distance to a subject.

You will see that if you, for example, stand two meters from your subject, the camera will "measure" three meters.

So, the real distance to the background is not importand. More importand is what the camera thinks is the distance to the background.

To determine that, you can use the PreMF function.
 

Phocal

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Use the PreMF to "measure" a distance to a subject.

You will see that if you, for example, stand two meters from your subject, the camera will "measure" three meters.

So, the real distance to the background is not importand. More importand is what the camera thinks is the distance to the background.

To determine that, you can use the PreMF function.
I don't know about the PreMF thing but I do know that the distance the EM1's report to exif is almost exact (within inches at close distances and within a foot or so at longer distances like 100 feet). Not sure why it would be different using the PreMF function as I would assume the distance is measured the same way.
 

Davidof_CR

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Still, when you are in the field, and you want to limit the focus to some trees in the background, how would you measure it ?
When you aim the camera at the trees and use the PreMF and Info, you get the distance measured directly by the camera.
Let us leave aside my judging of how exactly the distance is measured, it is not that importand.

The gist of what I wanted to say is that we have an inbuild distance meter in the camera and although it is not very handy, we can use it to limit the CAF :)
 

Phocal

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Still, when you are in the field, and you want to limit the focus to some trees in the background, how would you measure it ?
pull out my laser range finder and get the distance. mostly just to check how accurate I am in doing visually, which I am almost always within 10 feet or so. years of hunting with a bow and/or muzzle loader you get really good at judging distance.
 

Davidof_CR

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But more importand is what the camera measures.

If the camera measures that the trees are, say, 30 m from you and you measure 40 m and thus you set the limit to 35 m, it may focus on the trees, because it will consider it to be within your limits.
 

dirtdevil

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I’m always impressed with the sharpness of the images in this thread, and while I have been able to capture a few sharp ones with decent light, and without any TC attached, I took a shot of a pileated woodpecker (posted over in the Covid weekly challenge thread) that imo was less than stellar. I had the 1.4 Tc on but I’m thinking it was as much my technique as anything... hand held cuz the big guy doesn’t stay around long and I wanted the shot for the challenge. I have captured him/her successfully with the 40-150\2.8 + 1.4 but that was from much closer and he was on the sun side of the branch. This time, not so lucky.

Is there a specific technique of holding these long lens when shooting handheld? Ie. normally my left hand is underneath the barrel and usually closer to the body than the lens hood. Would I get more stability with hand fire the out towards the end of the lens?
One of my tricks, if you have the possibility to do that, is to sit on the floor, and to use the top of the knee as a base to rest the lens (while still having a hand under, just in case it slips, but without having to support the weight with your hand because the knee will do that).

Here is a generic picture I have found online to describe the position, I usually raise the left knee not the right one...you would have to rely on the lcd though, it would be hard to look through the evf.
relaxed-east-indian-man-sitting-floor-tall-middle-age-east-indian-man-sitting-brown-pants-red-...jpg
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Davidof_CR

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Sparrow games (praise the ProCapture :) )

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Mack

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There is a single hair strand visible in the flower petal so I know the lens is sharp!

I was using a couple of Godox AD-600 Pro TTL flash units with a long throw reflector to light the hummer up and give it more feather contrast. There may be a third smaller TT685-O on the ground given the four catchlights (Sun is dimmest on top as it was a cloudy day.).
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JayZay87

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I got a real close look at some Rufous hummingbirds that have been frequenting our feeders. Here are a few portrait shots taken with the 300mm Pro and EM1 mk1.
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Bristolero

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First springtime outing to Gull Island in the skiff yesterday morning.
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