Olympus 150-400 f4.5 IS Pro coming real soon now?

Ross the fiddler

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As to the case above with the 150-400mm f/4.5 lens stored vertically, I'll pass along some info I got from Los Angeles Nikon Service while in there for a lens issue. Fwiw, their manager seems to love working on lenses over the NYC Service Center that prefers bodies to work on.

The guy said not to store the zoom lenses vertically as the weight of the internals pushed against the rollers that are in the slots in the helicals. In time, they'd come loose and the things begin to bind up while zooming. When they would come loose, the threads in the helicals were often stripped and a costly barrel assembly replacement was needed. He said it's better to store them horizontally and as why some of their large Nikon hard cases for their huge lenses stored them that way.
Except 'the helicoils' is only moving internal zoom group(s) for this lens (also for the 40-150mm f2.8 Pro zoom lens). Olympus is showing that in 'their' own bag. Everybody with a backpack or holster camera bag has them vertical.
 
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Except 'the helicoils' is only moving internal zoom group(s) for this lens (also for the 40-150mm f2.8 Pro zoom lens). Olympus is showing that in 'their' own bag. Everybody with a backpack or holster camera bag has them vertical.
I think we have to make the distinction between carrying and storing. It'd be difficult to carry the 150-400 horizontally because it's quite long. Most likely it would be vertical in a bag or backpack. However, storing it horizontally between uses might be a good idea. I store all my long lenses horizontally in my dry cabinet simply because they won't fit vertically anyway. :)
 

Mack

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True, but the internal pieces that move the mass has more thrust against the stationary barrels when put down hard in a vertical position. The threads holding the rollers may only have 2-3 small threads into the thin barrels and why the rollers come out, and maybe too easily, and bind the assemblies up. Nikon repair guy has seen too much of lens abuse and I'll take his word for it.

Roger Cicala of Lensrentals has some blog where he takes a new Nikon 24-70 f/2.8 Z-mount zoom apart. You can see the rollers of the internal group. Plus, he points out the new assemblies Nikon puts small tape over the insides where the rollers screws are. The tape is to prevent the Locktite from chipping off the screws and getting on the elements. Never knew that was a problem, but explains why some see small crystals in their lenses. More of that is explained halfway down in his blog here: https://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2020/01/finally-the-nikon-z-24-70mm-f2-8-s-lens-teardown/

The zoom lens I took into Nikon Service was new and only 3 hours out of the store. It would not focus to infinity for some reason (Found out a shim wasn't present later on.). The service guy's first test was twisting the zoom and focus barrels to see if they are binding and I also got the speech about vertical storage is bad. One girl there said to take it back to dealer for an exchange, but it was the last they had so it had to get fixed. It's been fine since too.
 
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Ross the fiddler

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I think we have to make the distinction between carrying and storing. It'd be difficult to carry the 150-400 horizontally because it's quite long. Most likely it would be vertical in a bag or backpack. However, storing it horizontally between uses might be a good idea. I store all my long lenses horizontally in my dry cabinet simply because they won't fit vertically anyway. :)
Yes, I store my 40-150 Pro horizontally (with MC20), on the camera to be ready for birds in the backyard, but I think the 100-400 will take its place for that shortly. I won't have to think about this 150-400 Pro lens though. It is beyond my justifiable spending. :)
 
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There's at least two makers of super telephoto travel hoods. They're popular due to folding flat and because manufacturers hoods are renowned for breaking in the professional environment. They wrap around the lens and secure with Velcro.
The lens hood (actually, a dew shield) on my f/7 560mm lens (80mm refractor telescope with T mount) is a couple of feet of sewer pipe. I made it to slide back over the OTA for stowage.
 
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The lens hood (actually, a dew shield) on my f/7 560mm lens (80mm refractor telescope with T mount) is a couple of feet of sewer pipe. I made it to slide back over the OTA for stowage.
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I use a 100mm sewer pipe cap as a lens cap.
 
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Good one, Ross ;) .

My telescope was made by a friend who is an optical technician. The objective is one of a pair that came from tourist binoculars at (?) Mt Dandenong.

Hoya doublet, with adjustment screws at the back of the lens cell to allow astigmatism adjustment. Performs about as well as a similar Televue refractor, so pretty decent.
 

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