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oly lens converters only work with mkII kit lens?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by chromadame, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. chromadame

    chromadame Mu-43 Rookie

    23
    Mar 25, 2011
    Does anyone know if and why it doesn't work with the mk1 14-42 lenses? I was hoping I could buy these to encourage me to use my kit lens.
     
  2. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    The mkII kit lens has a filter thread diameter of 37 mm vs. 40.5 mm for the mkI. I suppose you simply can't cover the mkI front lens with a converter.

    Cheers,
     
  3. Spuff

    Spuff Mu-43 Top Veteran

    651
    Dec 5, 2010
    Berkshire, UK.
    The macro converter at least doesn't have a screw thread - it's a bayonet type mount (as is the included adaptor to attach it to the kit lens). And the mark 1 kit lens doesn't have the bayonet reception.
    The macro converter's glass is 52mm wide - so no problem covering the mark 1 lens.
    There may be other reasons they don't want it used/can't be used on the mark 1.

    But I'll let you into a secret - I tried a +4 close up filter just held in front of my 40-150 (I don't have the thread adaptor yet) and that crude test indicated that it might yield a better result than the Olympus macro adaptor. The +4 does significantly improve the macro capability of the kit lens on which I can fit it (well beating the 40-150 with macro (note the +4 doesn't magnify the image by 4 times)). And how much did the +4 cost on Ebay? £2.99 (about £5 all in with the thread adaptor I needed).
    Maybe more on this later after I've tested the 150 lens with the cheap +4.
     
  4. chromadame

    chromadame Mu-43 Rookie

    23
    Mar 25, 2011
    thank you. how do i get the little so-and-so thanked user for this?
     
  5. ddegomez

    ddegomez Mu-43 Regular

    40
    Apr 7, 2011
    Close up filters are very cheap but a major drawback to them is chromatic aberration. The center of the frame may be fine, but in the corners you'll see rainbow artifacts.
     
  6. Spuff

    Spuff Mu-43 Top Veteran

    651
    Dec 5, 2010
    Berkshire, UK.
    Two of the test shots with the Olympus converter I took showed shocking aberration. To the extent it turned the a blue box purple(see below). So I wouldn't count on it for an improvement there over cheap filters.

    Both shots in daylight.
    Here's the shot I took using the cheapo filter on the kit lens:
    View attachment 162558

    And the Olympus converter on 40-150 at full zoom:
    5634874035_e9c84cb0fb_z.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. shoturtle

    shoturtle  

    823
    Oct 15, 2010
    Just get a canon 500D or 250D closeup lens, and mount them on a longer zoom like the 40-150 or 45-200. 58mm thread for the 45-200 and 52mm thread for the 40-150 or 14-150. You can also look at the B+W with 2 or 4 diopter. 4 with the shorter zoom, 2 with a longer zoom.
     
  8. SRHEdD

    SRHEdD Mu-43 Top Veteran

    979
    Feb 24, 2011
    Viera, Florida USA
    Steve
    Why not extension tubes on a legacy lens?
     
  9. robertro

    robertro Mu-43 Veteran

    235
    Apr 22, 2010
    Close-up filters

    The simple 1-element close-up filters are decent, but if chromatic aberration is a concern, you can use higher-end achromatic filters. These are typically 2 bonded lenses in a filter assembly. I'm not sure of which the new Olympus add-on lens is, but there are many other choices.

    Some of the common ones are Canon 500D, Nikon 5T and 6T, and Olympus B-Macro lenses. Many more are listed on this site: Currently Available 2 Element (Achromatic) Close-up Lenses

    These are optically excellent and paired with a good 50mm manual focus lens (or even the kit zoom) they provide high quality macro.

    THey are so small and light that I pack one whenever I don't have my 50mm f2 macro lens with me, "just in case".
     
  10. shoturtle

    shoturtle  

    823
    Oct 15, 2010
    With a 50mm the canon 250D is the better option, the 4 diopter are very helpful to get up close. With the 500D with 2 diopter complement the lens of 70mm or longer with the mag of the lens.
     
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