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Odonata around my garden pond

Discussion in 'Nature' started by f6cvalkyrie, Jun 28, 2010.

  1. f6cvalkyrie

    f6cvalkyrie Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 12, 2010
    Brussels, Belgium
    Hi,

    Odonata is an order of insects, encompassing dragonflies (Anisoptera) and damselflies (Zygoptera).

    Several species visit my garden pond every summer. Sometimes, I manage to shoot pics of the nymphs.

    But here are two different full-grown specimens !

    sized_P1100195.

    sized_P1100202.

    Shot with g1 and Micro-Nikkor 200/4, handheld

    C U
    Rafael
     
    • Like Like x 3
  2. f6cvalkyrie

    f6cvalkyrie Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 12, 2010
    Brussels, Belgium
    I had seen this one yesterday as well, but did not succeed in shooting pics of him.

    Today, I was luckier :biggrin:

    sized_P1100232.

    sized_P1100236.

    G1 with Micro-Nikkor 200/4

    Comments and critique welcomed !

    C U
    Rafael​
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. BBW

    BBW Super Moderator Emeritus

    Raf, I think you've given these "grownups" new careers in modeling - wonderful photos!
     
  4. bilzmale

    bilzmale Mu-43 All-Pro

    Beautiful creatures and hard to find at rest - well done. I guess there are no fish in your pond.
     
  5. f6cvalkyrie

    f6cvalkyrie Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 12, 2010
    Brussels, Belgium
    In another forum, someone suggested that I'd use higher ISO to prevent small unsharpness caused by the continuous and fast shiverring of these insects.

    So I tried a shoot @ iso800 today. Resulting in exposuretimes @ 1/400 with f5.6

    I applied some noise reduction with NeatImage

    Here's an example !

    sized_P1100288.

    G1 with Micro-Nikkor 200/4

    Comments and critique highly appreciated !

    C U
    Rafael​
     
  6. grebeman

    grebeman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2010
    South Brent, south Devon (UK)
    Barrie
    I usually use an iso rating of 200, possibly 400 but certainly no more than that with results such as below.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I would be looking to use an f stop of 8.0 to obtain a sufficient depth of field.

    I'm not aware that damselflies or dragonflies shiver their wings continuously when resting. I have taken many photographs of them in 4/3 format and there are a number of non keepers due to results such as yours. Given the limited depth of field it's very important that the insect is as parallel to the plane of the sensor as is possible. The tail on your subject is out of focus, is that a similar effect with the wings rather than vibration of the insects wings? With respect I really feel you have too small a depth of field for the subject.

    Both above on Panasonic G1 with 105mm f/2.8 Sigma macro lens, iso 200, 1/200 sec, f/11, handheld

    Barrie

    Barrie
     
  7. f6cvalkyrie

    f6cvalkyrie Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 12, 2010
    Brussels, Belgium
    Hi, Barrie,

    there's a lot of difference in shooting conditions between your pics and mine.
    Your's are in full sunlight, my last is in the shade, and late in the afternoon.

    Hence, I absolutely need higher ISO.

    It was impossible for me to position myself in such a way that the plane of the insect would be parallel to the focal plane. This due to the fact that I would have had to stand in the water of my pond, and it's +/- 1 meter deep in that place.

    The shiverring of the insect is in the small hairs on legs, head and breast, not in the wings. It's rather visible in the pics of the Calopteryx. They seem 'wooly'. It's the way the insect keeps itself warm and ready to fly away.

    C U,
    Rafael