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NSFW: Question on Nudes / Posting other togs work

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by slackercruster, Aug 10, 2012.

  1. slackercruster

    slackercruster Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Jul 18, 2012
    NE US
    Am looking for a new home forum. My old forum did not work out. I have a few questions

    Are nude photos allowed here?

    Also I sometime post low resolution pix from other togs with or without their permission. To praise, illustrate a point or review. Is that going to be a problem?

    If it is a problem, is there another photo forum that you think I would fit into better? Would still stay here as a m43 user. But would not use it as my 'home forum'. And would not send you my archival materiel.


    Here is a sample of one of my posts. (NSFW) Show nudes as well as 'other togs' work to illustrate my original question.

    And please don't tell me to use links. Would you like to click on dozens and dozens of link to read one post?

    Links die, every photo can't be linked...links are crap. I already know this stuff, I write this for your benefit not mine and try to make it easy as I can on you to read it. So I post actual pix and use links as little as I can.



    Remembering Dye Transfer Color Printing


    As the old timers die off, the legacy of the fabled dye transfer print
    in our digital age is disappearing. Many young photogs you talk with
    never heard of the process. Dye transfers were the ultimate color
    print up to the early 1990's when Kodak stopped making the materials
    for dye transfer work. As a remembrance to the fabled dye transfer
    print, I thought I'd add my 2 cents to this subject to at least
    memorialize a tidbit more information about it.

    In the 1970's I was very fortunate to have worked for a short time
    with Bob Pace at Graphic Process Co in Hollywood CA. Bob was one of
    the top dye transfer men in the country. When he operated as Pace
    Color Labs in N.Y. he rolled out transfers for the top photographers
    of that time including Irving Penn and Yousuf Karsh. Bob relocated to
    the west coast and was the man to go to for high quality dye
    transfers. Bob was very generous with me with his time as well as even
    giving me materials for my own dye transfer experiments. Bob was
    always ready to help anyone interested in learning about the process.

    To give you a short rundown on how the dye transfer process works, it
    can be summed up in this actual dye transfer print from 1948 salesmans
    catalog for U.S. Color Print in Portland, OR.

    img031-jpeglr.

    An original color chrome / slide would be turned into a color
    interneg. This would be color separated into 3 different color
    separations through reg, green and blue filters onto matrix film. The
    matrix film would be developed in a tanning developer which hardened
    the exposed portions of the matrix film. Any un and underexposed
    gelatin would wash off in warm water. The remaining emulsion would
    absorb dye in proportion to its density. The 3 color separations on
    matrix film were dyed magenta, yellow and cyan and rolled in pin
    registration onto a final support paper. The paper absorbed the dye
    due to an imbalance in PH and after the last matrix was removed the
    dye transfer was ready to be dried.

    That is a simplified version of it. An expert may be able to produce a
    fine dye transfer in 8 hours. But if shadow and highlight masks or
    friskets need to be made, it took a lot longer. The actual rolling out
    of the print from dyed matrices took only 20 min or less.

    The beauty of dye transfer was a fresh set of color prints could be
    rolled off at any time from archival processed matrix separations. But
    the inherent permanency of the dyes Kodak used seldom made this
    necessary. In its heyday, dye transfer prints were the only color
    print a museum would accept in their collection. But since its demise,
    Type C, Cibachromes and Ink Jet prints are what museums are collecting
    now.

    IMAGE DELETED AS PER TOS

    Chromogentic / Type C print from the collection of Solomon R.
    Guggenheim Museum, New York.


    Let me talk a little about these various printing media I mentioned
    before continuing with the dye transfer process.

    Type C or Chromogenic printing is the standard wet developed color
    print we have all known since the late 1940's. In the early days the
    dyes were not very stable. But the makers have improved a lot in that
    dept. The problem with Type C was that many pros shot in chromes or
    slide film and a color interneg had to be produced to make the C
    print. This removed the actual image a generation away from the
    original. In the 1970's Agfacolor printing paper was an excellent
    paper for beautifully rendered color . The problem with Agfacolor was
    it faded quickly.

    Chromogenic color print - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    As an alternative to Type C, Ciba came out with Cibachrome.
    Cibachromes could be made from chrome / slides direct and did not need
    a color interneg made.

    Ilfochrome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I remember Graphic Process having a display of giant Cibachrome in the
    front window. Direct CA sunlight was blasting away at them all day.
    The Cibachromes developed a craquelure to the base...but the colors
    never faded. The bad thing about the Ciba was the plastic look of the
    base material. They also left a lot to be desired in the area of print
    control that masking offered with the dye transfers. Cibachromes
    tended to look like hell after they were handled some. Color wise it
    is very good. And fade resistance it is excellent. But the shiny
    plastic surface ruined it. If it was type F surface they would have
    had a winner.

    Cibachromes reminded me of a shiny black Cadillac. It looks great the
    first day out of the showroom...and it is all downhill from there.
    Just like the black car, the super shiny Ciba shows all defects,
    scratches, fingerprints, dust. In the end, Cibachromes could not
    compare to dye transfers when it came to making a beautiful,
    traditional print.

    Here is a sample Cibachrome print showing some handling wear and tear.

    IMAGE DELETED AS PER TOS

    ciba4.


    In our modern day we do have a replacement to the dye transfer print.
    It is actually a dye transfer print made by machine...the ink jet
    print. Ink jet printing is capable of producing very high quality
    prints with excellent dye permanence and anti fading characteristics.
    Here is a a sample 4 x 5 ink jet print made with a 5 color inexpensive
    ink jet printer from Walmart.

    img045jpeglr.


    I'll leave you with some samples of dye transfer prints from the late
    1940's and early 1950's that were just scanned. They have been stored
    in normal conditions with contact to acid containing boards. No signs
    of fading I can see. Prints were made by Dean Child and a company he
    owned called 'U.S Color Print' in Portland OR.


    img024jpeglr.


    img026-2-jpeglr.


    img028-2-Cjpeglr.


    img029-2-Copy.


    img038-Copy.


    img046-Copy.


    img047-Copy.


    img035-Copy.


    img051.


    img052-Copy.


    img053-Copy-1.


    img049-Copy.


    img048-Copy.


    img0332.


    img030a-2.


    Be sure to check out the dye transfer archives:

    David Doubley - Mostly Photographs

    Lots of great info there including Bob Pace bulletins archived as well
    as videos of Bob going through the dye transfer process.

    BobPacedyeTransferTech.

    If your short on time, just watch the intro and the segment showing
    Bob rolling out a print.

    Dye-transfer process - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia





    Thanks
     
  2. snkenai

    snkenai Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Sep 5, 2010
    Read the rules.
     
  3. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    If the work is out of copyright, you can use it. However, you may not have permission to use the reproduction of a work as that could belong to any copyright holder. As a photographer, I would not want you to use my images without permission. You seem happy to simply steal the images without any effort to contact the copyright holder. I find that disturbing. And then to suggest you would take someone else's work for my benefit and not yours is rather weak justification when clearly you are using the work solely for your purpose.

    As a former dye-transfer, C (RA-4), and Cibachrome printer, it is easy to find information on the process without your contribution so I see no reason to simply take images. You also seem to put links in your article and so you can put links to images just as easy as to Wikipedia.

    Just my 2c from a person that creates photography and believes copyright belongs to the creator.