Night/sky/Moon/Star shot

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by kevinaldo, Apr 17, 2013.

  1. kevinaldo

    kevinaldo Mu-43 Regular

    Nov 30, 2012
    CA, USA
    I am trying to take photographs on moon with stars, what setting/ISO/aperture/len/hardware do you use?
  2. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Real Name:
    Use low ISO and a tripod at a place without city lights at shutter speed of a least 1/2 a minute. If you do not get the effect you want increase the shutter time.
    All the lenses you have can give you nice results.
    For a detailed moon shoot you need a long tele.
  3. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Tripod, shuttershock 1 sec + 2sec timer comes in handy.
  4. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Real Name:
  5. Blastop

    Blastop Mu-43 Regular

    Jun 20, 2011
  6. woody112704

    woody112704 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Dec 13, 2012
    Real Name:
    If you shoot somewhere where some light is in the shot (faint) like to the side it can produce some very nice effects. Look at Dukebnukem's shots. His are absolutely amazing.
  7. arad85

    arad85 Mu-43 Veteran

    Aug 16, 2012
    You will get star trails if you go for longer than 30 seconds. They will be worse pointing towards the equator (and short pointing towards either pole). The effect is minimised the shorter the lens though. Low as you can get away with on ISO, as large an aperture as possible (primes are great for this - 25mm or shorter will give you some nice effects of the sky).

    Deep sky (anything beyond what you can make out with your eye) really needs a tracking German Equatorial Mount. Decent ones start at £several hundred....

    The moon just needs telephoto (as elavon has said) and a fairly fast shutter speed. You will need to set the exposure manually though (last time I did it I had a DSLR attached to a telescope and was using F8-10 and a shutter speed of 1/250th or faster from memory) - auto exposure will not be able to cope with the extremes of light/dark.