Next Lens?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by col902, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. col902

    col902 Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Oct 4, 2011
    So money was tight, and i just bought an e-p1 with the 17mm pancake and the vf1. I was wondering which lens i should buy next? After I get some more money of course :smile: I would like a zoom, and would like it to be $250 or under. I am open to any brand, and dont care about size because i got the 17mm for a small lens. Thanks for help!
     
  2. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    Well what sort of zoom? You've got the ultra-wides (7-14, 9-18), the kits (14-42 O/P or the 14-45), the teles (40-150, 45-200, 100-300), and the full ranges (14-150, 14-140). Of those, only the kits and the smaller teles are really obtainable for your budget. The Olympus 40-150 in particular was available for $100 earlier today on Amazon but it looks like that's gone now...
     
  3. col902

    col902 Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Oct 4, 2011
    what do you think would accompany the the 17mm better, the 14-42 (which is like 28-84) or the 40-150 (80-300)? or is there a better option in my price range?
     
  4. Bokeaji

    Bokeaji Gonzo's Dad O.*

    Aug 6, 2011
    Austin, TX
    Uh oh
    You just missed the 40-150 on sale for $99

    I'd say 40-150. The 17 is covered in the 14-42 already. So id think you'd have tendency to use one or the other. Shrug. Or at least I would :)

    I went from a two zoom kit on my e30, to an all prime kit(so far) on my ep3. I'm loving the all primes and the fun it's brought back to photography. Reminds me of when I took a course in college I guess.

    Wow I sound oooold!

    but with the camera being so small, I'm thinking I'll stick to primes to keep them small.. So I say save up for the 45/1.8 :)
    And then if u need more reach, go for a *-300 lens later

    - Eliot
     
  5. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Look for a used Olympus 14-42 version 2 (~$125 - make sure it's version 2 - much better AF than version 1) for starters. The 40-150 is a good option too. There aren't that many other zoom lenses in the $250 range.

    DH
     
  6. col902

    col902 Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Oct 4, 2011
    are there any other fixed 45 mm that would fit on it other than the oly?
     
  7. yottavirus

    yottavirus Mu-43 Regular

    115
    Aug 13, 2011
    That's not the right question to ask.
    What focal length do you feel is lacking from your bag?

    If you can't answer that, then there's no point in asking others for what you want, they don't know and you're just buying gear for the sake of it.
     
  8. sLorenzi

    sLorenzi Mu-43 Top Veteran

    586
    Sep 15, 2010
    Brazil
    Sidinei
    Nope, the other 45 is way more expensive.
     
  9. col902

    col902 Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Oct 4, 2011
    i want something that i can use to zoom in on subjects when i cant get close to them and use the 17mm, i think the 40-150 would be good
     
  10. col902

    col902 Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Oct 4, 2011
    for just getting closer up on subjects the 40-150 will be beter than the 14-42 if i already have the 17 right?
     
  11. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    Well naturally. It's a longer lens after all. Just FYI, going price for a used 45-200 is only around $200, so you might want to keep an eye for that as well.
     
  12. Bokeaji

    Bokeaji Gonzo's Dad O.*

    Aug 6, 2011
    Austin, TX
    in case yer unaware of places to check for used lenses
    you can check in this forums marketplace, keh.com, bhphoto.com, adorama.com and fred miranda apparently has tons of used stuff, but all ive ever seen there is nikon and canon stuff
     
  13. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yes. There are many wonderful "fast 50" legacy lenses which work wonderfully on PEN cameras, ranging from f/1.2, f/1.4, f/1.5, f/1.8, and f/2. This includes 40mm and 55mm lenses, which still fall under the "fast 50" realm. The f/1.8 lenses are often pancakes, but the f/1.4 lenses are not much larger. The rangefinder lenses are thin and although not flat like a pancake lens they are overall small like the m.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8. Rangefinder lenses are more compact because they do not require a large adapter as they are made for a mirrorless system, and almost all their lenses are high quality.

    These lenses can be purchased for quite cheap. They're not all cheap, but they're all really cheap compared with any digital counterparts. You just need to find which mount you want and get an adapter for it. You will only have manual focus, and you want to make sure the lens has an aperture ring.

    I would highly suggest the OM series Zuiko lenses, as you can hardly find a bad lens in that series. ;) They pretty much all have wonderful, rich colors. Konica Hexanon lenses are very sharp (considered the sharpest for 35mm film), and some other popular brands include Minolta Rokkor and Pentax SMC. There are also wonderful Russian rangefinder lenses which are copied from Zeiss designs and some even use Zeiss parts. They have good optical design but sell for very cheap, such as the Jupiter series from KMZ.
     
  14. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    I would strongly recommend against MF lenses for the OP. The E-P1 doesn't support an EVF, and the low resolution of the rear LCD makes confirming correct focus doubly difficult. Further, for somebody who's just starting out, MF tends to be quite frustrating.

    DH
     
  15. steelerdan69

    steelerdan69 Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Aug 23, 2011
    How do u guys find out about this great low price? Man I would of bought one! I added one to my cart I will keep checking the price.
     
  16. Markb

    Markb Mu-43 Top Veteran

    532
    Jun 9, 2011
    Kent, UK
    Mark
    17/2.8 and an OM 50/1.8 on an E-P1 do it for me at present :thumbup:

    Manual focusing on the E-P1 is mainly a matter of practice and not really so bad if you're stopped down a bit i.e. normal daylight use. Wide open and close up in poor light is harder but doable.
     
  17. col902

    col902 Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Oct 4, 2011
    i would like the zoom of the 40-150, but the size and build quality of the 45 is great! Which would you go with? Are the pictures taken with the 40-150 even close to the 45?
     
  18. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    The 40-150mm focal range is very different from the 45mm focal length. If there were a 100mm or 150mm prime in the Micro Four-Thirds lineup, then it would be difference... Since native primes only go to 45mm at the moment, that means you have only three choices for telephoto - slow native zoom, fast but large Four-Thirds zoom, or legacy (prime or zoom).

    Personally, I prefer legacy primes to retain the compact nature of the system without sacrificing in lens speed or optical quality, and Four-Thirds zooms when I need the very best in speed and performance. I don't bother with slow zooms, native or otherwise... but that's my personal preference. There are advantages to native lenses, but they just don't concern me as much.

    If the fastest AF possible is your primary concern, then you should stick with native lenses and either one of the late-generation PENs or the Panasonic GH2 or G3. That would leave you with only the choice of a slow zoom in the telephoto range. If optical quality and lens speed is more important, then there are better options.
     
  19. col902

    col902 Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Oct 4, 2011
    do you have to manual focus the legacy primes? wouldnt that be hard with the low res screen of the e-p1?
     
  20. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yes, it is! But then, the E-P1 also doesn't take advantage of the fast autofocus of native lenses either... Unfortunately, that body is a compromise in both areas, but still capable in both.

    So in other words, don't worry about the limitations of the E-P1 when choosing what kind of lenses to get. Just worry about how those lenses suit you best, and learn to work with the idiosyncrasies of the E-P1 until you can upgrade to a newer body (and I wouldn't suggest upgrading to an E-P2 or E-PL1 either... not that they aren't great cameras, but they're just not a real upgrade from your E-P1, which is just as capable).