Newbie: Olympus E-PL6

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by Dayam, Jan 15, 2014.

  1. Dayam

    Dayam Mu-43 Regular

    147
    Jan 15, 2014
    Singapore
    Dave
    Hi Guys,

    I'm a newbie to this forum as well as to the photography world. After doing a lot of research with M43's, I ended up with the Olympus E-PL6.

    Below are some of my questions:

    I would like to know if there are any default settings I need to change? When taking pictures in my bedroom with a florescent light, I noticed that the skin tone on the camera is a bit on the Orange side.

    The shop where I got my E-PL6 from also suggested that I get filters which would help a lot. Are these really needed?

    Being a beginner, I find the lens pretty good. But if I was to change my lens if I wanted a faster one, what would any of you recommend? Something that an average shooter can probably use anywhere.

    Thanks a lot!
     
  2. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    a) Skin tone - make sure you turn off "keep warm color" (in the White Balance menu I think - Google it if you're unsure).

    b) Skin tone - try shooting raw and fixing it later (you'll need a decent post processing application such as Lightroom).

    c) Filters - don't start playing with filters until you know what to do with them. For me, I only ever use neutral density (ND) and circular polarisers (CPL) filters. Colour filters are a waste of time with a digital sensor shot in raw.

    d) Lens - if you want a good low-light lens for general shooting, the best options will be either the Panasonic 20mm f1.7 or the Olympus 17mm f1.8
     
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  3. Dayam

    Dayam Mu-43 Regular

    147
    Jan 15, 2014
    Singapore
    Dave
    I did check the option "keep warm color" under WB and set it to off. This fixed the problem!

    Regarding the filters, the sales person I talked to suggested I get the UV filter as well as the ND and Polarizer. So I guess these filters are okay right?

    I checked out both the Lens you suggested and they both got good reviews! Will definitely consider them!

    Thank you!
     
  4. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    The UV filter is useless and even possibly detrimental if image quality is the goal. It can work OK as a protection filter, which is the only reason I own a couple - protecting the front element if shooting in really poor conditions, such as windy beaches with sand blowing everywhere. ND and CPL filters have effects you can't achieve with photoshop, and have a place in my camera bag.
     
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  5. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    +1 to mattia. Filters can only degrade IQ in terms of sharpness, flare, contrast etc. They may have other desirable effects of course and the very best (and most expensive) will degrade IQ the least. UV filters can play a role in improving IQ in some situations, but most people use them for protection. I think that's fine, so long as there's a need for protection (windy beaches etc as mattia says). Some people leave them on all the time in an effort to protect the front element against knocks/falls, but for me that's a bad idea; you'll lose IQ and the protection is a chimera - if you break the filter then you'll shower your expensive lens with tiny shards of broken glass which is probably the best way known to man to scratch the coatings! Some people don't agree with this opinion - choose your poison!!
     
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  6. Itchybiscuit

    Itchybiscuit Photon Mangler

    512
    Dec 10, 2013
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Ivor
    It's very true that you may badly damage your coatings should the filter shatter but if you hit your lens hard enough to do so then I suggest your lens is already Donald Duck'd. I hang a CPL off of mine to prevent scratching the lens itself - I'm sure that it's been said before but I'd rather buy a new filter than a new lens!
     
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  7. Ulfric M Douglas

    Ulfric M Douglas Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 6, 2010
    Northumberland
    He was just trying to make money off you.
     
  8. snkenai

    snkenai Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Sep 5, 2010
    Filters, Hoods

    I keep a hood on my lenses, all the time, for two reasons.

    One: It will take a pretty hard knock, and offers quite a bit of protection.
    Two: For the reason they were made for, to offer flare resistance and gives better contrast. At least those are the ones I'm familiar with.

    I don't use filters, except the Pentax +1 close-up, that I almost always have with me. I keep a hood on it. I should use a CP. I have one, but just don't think about having it with me all the time.
     
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  9. Cruzan80

    Cruzan80 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 23, 2012
    Denver, Co
    Sean Rastsmith
    People are opinionated about UV filters, in both camps. Personally, all mine have higher quality UV filters on them. For now, I would hold off on the ND and PL until you get the hang of general photography, then add to your kit, so you only have to learn one thing at a time. As far as another lens, I would stick with the kit lens for a bit until you get an idea of where you like to shoot. There are several options in the same focal lengths as the zoom covers, so if you find yourself shooting one "zone" (say 22-28mm) then it tells you that you may benefit/use that the most (in this case, a 25mm). Between 15-30mm could be considered "average", and would give either a bit wider or a bit tighter than your eye may normally see.

    Sent from my LG-P769 using Mu-43 mobile app
     
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  10. snkenai

    snkenai Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Sep 5, 2010
  11. Dayam

    Dayam Mu-43 Regular

    147
    Jan 15, 2014
    Singapore
    Dave
    Thanks for all the response. I really like how portable the Panasonic 20mm and Olympus 17mm is. I will have to save up to get one of these two.

    Thanks so much for all the responses.

    BTW, how do you thank a post?

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk
     
  12. Cruzan80

    Cruzan80 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 23, 2012
    Denver, Co
    Sean Rastsmith
    If using the mobile app, clicking on a post will bring up the option. On the web, bottom left of the post.
     
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  13. Gary Ramey

    Gary Ramey Mu-43 Veteran

    240
    Dec 27, 2012
    Aurora Colorado
    Cheap lens no filter, expensive lens I put a good quality filter on for protection.
     
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  14. Dayam

    Dayam Mu-43 Regular

    147
    Jan 15, 2014
    Singapore
    Dave
    Okay. So no filter for my kit lens then! :)

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk
     
  15. Dayam

    Dayam Mu-43 Regular

    147
    Jan 15, 2014
    Singapore
    Dave
    Hi guys,

    Just another question. What is the slowest acceptable shutter speed I can shoot handheld with the E-PL6?
     
  16. Adubo

    Adubo SithLord

    Nov 4, 2010
    Globetrotter
    Andrew
    re: filters...

    both camps have points on whether to put a filter or not... i prefer the latter (and my two cents)

    back when they still used film cameras of old, the films can "see" the UV rays and so they had a bluish cast (some people all it haze - YES, haze and UV filters are the same) on the images.. but in the digital realm, AFAIK, and correct me if im wrong, this doesnt occur anymore.

    ...but of course, a filter infront of your lens, cheap or expensive, is added protection. i just dont bother with them.

    YMMV
     
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  17. Bhupinder2002

    Bhupinder2002 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    EPL6....:confused: when was it launched ?
     
  18. Dayam

    Dayam Mu-43 Regular

    147
    Jan 15, 2014
    Singapore
    Dave
    I think it was somewhere around May of last year. It was initially exclusive for Asian countries AFAIK.

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk
     
  19. HarryS

    HarryS Mu-43 Top Veteran

    919
    Jun 23, 2012
    Midwest, USA
    This depends on the focal length, the capability of any image stabilization, and also the user.

    a) Longer focal lengths magnify small camera movements, so shorter focal lengths are easier to hand hold. A methodology based on film cameras said that shutter speed should be under 1/(focal length). So with your kit lens, that would be 1/14 at the wide end and 1/42 at the longer end.

    b) People are different. Some people throw a ball further than others. So some people are steadier. Also some people have bad technique.

    c) Image stabilization can help, or hurt. Users argue about the effectiveness of IS on the EPL5/6. Just try it out yourself at desk. Experiment with long exposures at 14mm/42mm at your desk, See how long you can go and still have a decent picture. Try it with a 2 second delay. Try antishock at 1/8" second.
    -With my EM5, it's a no-brainer to hand hold 17mm at 1/2 second and get a good image.
    -With my EPL5, I get a "reasonable" image at 17mm over half the time with IS. With IS off, almost never.
    -With my EPM1 which has probably the weakest IS, 1/2" handheld at 17mm can be done enough to make it worth a try, but I need 2 second delay, and the shot isn't all that good,
    Your results will surely be different.

    editted to clarify that 1/2 second is tough without an EM5.
     
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  20. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    The 1/focal length rule applies to full frame cameras. For MFT that would be 1/2xfocal length. And even that assumes good handholding technique.
     
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