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Newb looking for a little help.. :)

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by mix123, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. mix123

    mix123 Mu-43 Regular

    53
    Nov 5, 2011
    Hi. Ive been lurking on here for a while trying to decide which m43 camera is for me. Im looking to upgrade from the world of compacts and buy myself a little graduation gift in December. Originally I was all about the pen-ep3. The touch to focus looks pretty slick and the touch screen in general looks nice to use. Then I started thinking about cost and that I probably dont need a $900 camera to start. So I started looking at the EPM1. Price is good, love the size. Is a built in flash really that important? So I guess Im just wondering if I should grab another lens with the epm1 or will the 14-42 it comes with be fine. What exactly is that lens good for? I want something that works well outdoors for landscapes or pictures while traveling, but also works well indoors in low light situations for portraits, partys etc. Im assuming there is no lens that does both of those extremely well so any recommendations would be extremely helpful!!

    THANKS.
     
  2. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    E-PM1 with m.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8 would be my suggestion, keeping the whole package under $900. Might be a little long for your landscapes, but you could always use your kit lens for that. If it's possible, I would get the 17mm f/2.8 pancake as a kit lens to cover that wider angle and pair with the 45mm f/1.8. However, I know the pancake is only available with the E-P3 in my area, so it would depend on what's available where you live.
     
  3. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    First, if you want an E-P3 and can afford it, why not buy it?

    Second, the kit lens will be good for the things you want. I would use that lens for a bit and get an idea of what you like to shoot and what limitations the lens has for you before buying more lenses. Lenses are really a personal choice coming from experience. I would get some experience.
     
  4. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Flash depends on what you're trying to do. Built-in ones are generally too small and weak to be good for anything that's not very near.

    14-42 is good for outdoors. Some people like more range at the long end, but it's a good starting point.

    For indoors though, you'll want a lens with a wider aperture. For general indoors shots, a normal lens like the Panasonic 20/1.7 is a good option. For portraits, usually a longer lens is preferred (less distortion of nearer features) - something like the new Olympus 45/1.8.

    Best thing to do is to just get the kit, then figure out where it's letting you down, and purchase accordingly.

    DH
     
  5. mix123

    mix123 Mu-43 Regular

    53
    Nov 5, 2011
    Well if I can save myself $400 and not really miss any of the features of the EP3 why wouldnt I? I think the EP3 might be a little much when I really dont even know what i want or need in a camera.

    I will give the kit lens a go and see how well it works. Thanks for the input!
     
  6. Wes7

    Wes7 Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Oct 22, 2011
    Lesotho
    I would recommend any of the current bodies, so long as you get the Panasonic 20mm 1.7 or the new Pana/Leica 25mm.

    I was in the same position as you last Spring and ended up going for an E-P1 with the 14-42mm kit lens and a Panasonic 20mm. I eventually got a 50mm F1.8 Nikon lens for the cost of an adapter that I used for portraits. My photography needs were very similar to what you are talking about. I found I used the 20mm the most, followed by the 50. I hardly ever used the 14-42mm due to the slow aperture. I also just never liked the feel of that lens.

    I recommend the Panasonic 20mm or 25mm over going for something like the Oly 45mm because, if you are going to have a one lens kit, the 20 or 25mm lenses will give you a more versatile field of view. I have found that, when shooting indoors with my 50mm, I can't get far enough away to get anything besides portraits.

    If it were my money, I would pick up a E-P2 body-only for $300 and then buy the Panasonic 20 and the Olympus 45. The E-P2 is not state-of-the-art, but if you are coming from a point & shoot like I was, you won't know what you are missing. That would give you a good body and two great lenses to get started with for just over $1000- not far past the cost of the E-P3. You could also get the body only and the 20mm for just $645 and still save money over the E-P3.
     
  7. krugorg

    krugorg Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jul 18, 2011
    Minnesota USA
    I have the E-P3 and my wife is using the E-PL3.

    I am not a huge touch screen guy, but I do find the E-P3's touch focus, and sometimes even touch shutter, to be helpful and I use the options more than I expected I would.

    But... I also use the find the tilt screen on my wife's E-PL3 to be useful. Not too difficult to select the focus point with the manual controls, or you can just do the focus/recompose thing.

    Maybe the other option would be to go with the E-PL3, but a Franiec grip, and then use the money saved towards either the 20/1.7 or 45/1.8.
     
  8. mix123

    mix123 Mu-43 Regular

    53
    Nov 5, 2011
    The small size of the EPM1 and the 20mm pancake look perfect. I think I will go with that setup and see how I like it.
     
  9. krugorg

    krugorg Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jul 18, 2011
    Minnesota USA
    One other cool thing about going this route, is that if you end up really digging m4/3 and buy another body (e.g., E-P3, GX1, E-P5?), you can always still get a lot of use with the E-PM1 as your super compact body option.

    Heads up - on the 20mm mounted on the E-PM1 or E-PL3 looks a little funny because of the diameter of the lens being more than the lens mount standoff on the body. The Oly lens and the Panasonic 14mm are narrower and so, in my opinion, look better mounted. I am not trying to steer you away from the 20/1.7, it is the lens I use the most, I just wanted to make you aware.
     
  10. mix123

    mix123 Mu-43 Regular

    53
    Nov 5, 2011
    I get what you're saying...Any pics of this?
     
  11. Andrew Riddell

    Andrew Riddell Mu-43 Regular

    41
    Aug 21, 2010
    London
  12. krugorg

    krugorg Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jul 18, 2011
    Minnesota USA
  13. andyw

    andyw Mu-43 Veteran

    410
    Jan 27, 2010
    Surrey. UK
    Sounds to me like you need a Panasonic G3!! Swivel touch screen, Built in EVF, 15.8M pixel high quality images and yours for £480ish (UK Pounds) with kit lens.

    Or the E-PL3 is also a great choice!
     
  14. mix123

    mix123 Mu-43 Regular

    53
    Nov 5, 2011
    G3 looks a little large.
     
  15. Art

    Art Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2011
    San Francisco, CA
    E-PM1 is a solid choice. I love mine, really fun to use. To take advantage of a compact form factor, you'd need to get either Panny 20mm or 14mm prime. If you plan to keep the kit zoom, I suggest getting Panny 20mm for compactness, low light (evenings, indoors, etc) and shallow DoF fun. If you want to sell the zoom (like many of us did), I suggest getting Panny 14mm and Oly 45mm f1.8 prime combo. This prime combo is helluva fast focusing powerhouse.
    The bundled flash which comes with E-PM1 is so tiny and light (1oz) that I just leave it on most of the times so it's not a problem at all. The important thing to do is to set flash exposure compensation to +1EV (only need to do it once). Otherwise pictures will end up being underexposed since the flash is in a semi-bounced position when activated.
     
  16. BAKatz

    BAKatz Mu-43 Veteran

    247
    Sep 9, 2010
    Riverdale, NY
    Regardless of which camera you buy, I personally think, before you start loading up on lenses, buy the EVF. Without this, shooting outside in bright sunlight is extremely difficult. This is by far the best accessory I have. Just the humble opinion of an EPL-1 user.
     
  17. Art

    Art Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2011
    San Francisco, CA
    The OP is coming from P&S and was probably fine using LCD in the sun so I doubt EVF should be a top priority. E-PM1 has double the resolution of E-PL1 and better contrast ratio/refresh rate. The key is to set brightness to its highest level. I've shot with E-PL2 and E-PM1 in Hawaii, California and Florida over the past few months. Even though I did have VF-2 with me I ended up using LCD even in bright sun with no issues. Thankfully, Oly metering (especially E-PM1) is pretty much spot on. EVF should be a priority if using MF lenses.

     
  18. xdayv

    xdayv Color Blind

    Aug 26, 2011
    Tacloban City, Philippines
    Dave
    amazingly it's compact on actual use.
     
  19. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    It's a little thicker and a little wider and a little taller. But remember that if you add an EVF to the Olympus cameras, they will be the bigger ones (EVF sticks out a fair bit).

    DH
     
  20. mix123

    mix123 Mu-43 Regular

    53
    Nov 5, 2011
    Thanks. This is extremely helpful! I think I will start with the 20mm and the kit lens then go from there.