New WD Passport drive could be the perfect travel photo backup solution

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Holoholo55, Jun 21, 2016.

  1. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    • Informative Informative x 2
  2. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    I have the original Passport Wireless, and it works great. I just wish they'd do a version with an SSD...
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
  3. christofp

    christofp Mu-43 Regular

    138
    Jul 21, 2012
    Meh...

    Last year I was searching for a backup solution to take on a longer trip.

    I realized that I can get a very nice Dell 8' tablet for the same price. Much more flexible for sorting and storing photos. I can even run Lightroom on this little gem ...

    Christof
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. gpburdell

    gpburdell Mu-43 Veteran

    248
    Jul 16, 2014
    Please post a link to this $200 Dell tablet with 1TB storage that you mention. I couldn't find it on Dell's website.
     
  5. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Top Veteran

    767
    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    I am sure you were just being facetious, but the poster never mentioned any such thing. I believe his point was that the tablet was sufficient for his needs for backing up on a trip, NOT that it has the same 1TB storage as the WD drive. To his point, I too have found that most of the larger capacity thumb drives & microSD cards are more than enough storage for the purpose of short term backup during a trip.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. jo45800

    jo45800 Mu-43 Veteran

    265
    Aug 23, 2013
    Montreal
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
    Thanks, I just bought the older model a couple of weeks ago. I'm going to return and get the newer one. One of the things that I didn't like about the old one was that there were just two LED for four functions - power, disk access, wifi, and transfer status - and you had to decipher what colors and what blinking speeds meant what. Looks like the new version has added more LEDs, hope they improve usability. The added speed will be nice too. It looks to be thinner and wider, which may or may not be a good thing.
     
  8. gpburdell

    gpburdell Mu-43 Veteran

    248
    Jul 16, 2014
    You are quite perceptive. Yes, I was being facetious. :) My point, albeit subtly made, was to decry his dismissiveness of the WD drive solution.

    FWIW, I don't one one of these drives. On my last trip I carried my 12" Macbook for photo backups; I already owned it and I was able to sync back to my home NAS via hotel wifi each night providing an additional layer of backups.
     
  9. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I think you'd find about zero benefit to that. SSD benefits random file access. Copying and backing up photos is long running sequential work. Regular HDD are rarely the bottleneck for that kind of work.
     
  10. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Top Veteran

    767
    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    They also benefit with much lower power consumption, so that is indeed a possible benefit for a battery operated device. Downside is for the same price point of the device, the storage capacity would be much lower with a SSD version.
     
  11. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
    And you can't crash a drive head onto a platter if you're doing a transfer during lunch and accidentally drop the drive.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  12. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    You might be surprised. Most of those "SSD use less power" comparisons are done vs desktop drives. Those do use a lot more power. However laptop 2.5" drives are extremely power efficient. For example, the WD Blue 1TB 2.5" drive uses 1.4W during activity and .1W in sleep. Samsung 512GB SSD drives uses 3-3.5W while active, but only .05w when idle. SSD takes more than twice as much during activity, but uses half as much when "parked".

    So in this case, the SSD needs a higher wattage battery to handle peak draw, but may use slightly less overall charge depending on percentage of time powered on and idle.

    Can't argue with that one! Don't drop your drives.... :)
     
  13. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
    Just cancelled my order. Too physically big for my needs.
     
  14. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    You may be right about a big thumb drive being enough space. In my experience, the problem has been transferring the photos to an appropriate drive. I used two different models of Kingston's MobileLite Wireless devices and found neither worked. I think the main weakness of those was the WiFi mediation requirement. It had to have a WiFi connection with your smartphone or tablet to mediate the transfer of data with an app. It worked fine at home, but never reliably on travel for whatever reason. I grew to distrust WiFi connections on travel. So, my backup solution has to be self-contained and not be dependent on WiFi. I need something that has a physical SD card reader or a USB cable connection to the camera, and directly transfers the photos to a physical drive. I would use a mobile device to view the photos and make sure they've transferred correctly, but not to mediate the transfer. A big advantage of the WD Passport Wireless models is the smart software that automatically copies any new files to the drive automatically when the SD card is inserted.

    Taking a laptop could work, but would not suit my travel needs. To travel light, I prefer to take only a tablet or smartphone. Therefore, my preference for a compact self-contained backup solution. Hence my interest in the Passport Wireless.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2016
    • Like Like x 1
  15. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Top Veteran

    767
    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    One solution I am looking into, but haven't tried yet, is picking up a larger microSD card for my Android phone. I use a 32GB SD card in my E-M1 and the last two summers used it for summer vacations and never filled the card on either trip. So for my Android phone, a 64GB microSD card should be plenty, about $15-$18. Then pick up one of these card readers...
    https://amzn.com/B01BXSKPES
    only $8.

    On a trip, in the evening back at the hotel, I can pop the SD card out of my E-M1, put it into the reader and plug the reader into my phone. Now I can just copy the days files to the phone's internal microSD card. Fairly self contained with direct transfer from one card to another. When I get home I will still import my shots off the camera's SD card, but until I get home I at least have backups on my phone.

    Plus the microSD card in the phone can be used for other phone tasks as well, so dual purpose.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
    I bought a 200GB microSD for my Samsung Galaxy with the same idea. But then I decided to shoot video on my next trip, and 200GB is not enough. Should work fine for stills though.
     
  17. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    I have a 5" x 3" x 1/4" 512GB SSD LaCie Porsche Design, which they no longer make, that is my mobile storage device for times that I am not using an iPad.
     
  18. PacNWMike

    PacNWMike Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Dec 5, 2014
    Salish Sea
    guess?
    I take a 10" tablet. It has usb ports and card slot so I plug the camera into one and a WD Elements drive into the other. I also copy to a thumb drive which my wife carries, 3x backups counting the SD cards. Short trips I skip the little Elements drive and just use thumb drives. Not really seeing how wifi would be any easier. One more bit of usb cord to schlep but usb3 is faster than wifi anyway. Now I have an EM5ii but haven't used the wifi feature. Not sure I trust the wifi enough to leave the cord at home. I guess I could just pull the card. And the little Elements drive about ½ the size as that new MyPassport wireless drive and 1/3rd the cost. Just talked myself out of it. :)
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  19. gpburdell

    gpburdell Mu-43 Veteran

    248
    Jul 16, 2014
    On my latest trip I took my 12" Macbook. At 2lb it wasn't an issue to carry. Added benefit was that everything copied off the cameras synced to my home NAS via the hotel wifi/internet each night for an added layer of backup. :thumbup:
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. cptobvious

    cptobvious Mu-43 Veteran

    239
    Jan 8, 2013
    Slightly off-topic, but it surprises me that it's 2016 and camera makers still have not incorporated a simple backup function into their cameras (aside from a second card slot, but only in some brands). I'd rather not have to carry a laptop or buy one of these when traveling just to back up my cards.

    I'd like a camera that I can plug any USB drive into and back up that way. Or a camera that can upload directly to cloud storage via Wifi without having to connect via an app (every camera connection app I've used to date has been a letdown with spotty connections).

    /rant
     
    • Agree Agree x 3