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Discussion in 'Welcomes and introductions' started by dymond2102, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. dymond2102

    dymond2102 New to Mu-43

    3
    Jun 18, 2013
    Chelmsford, Essex
    Hi there, I've recently moved across from my point and shoot panasonic DMC-TZ5 to a G5 and would be grateful for any advice/tips you all had on lenses, accessories etc. I currently have the 14-42mm and 45-150mm lenses and also recently purchased a macro attachment. Whilst generally pleased with most shots I am getting I'd like to broaden my ability and also learn more about the camera functions (so that I don't always revert to the iA button!).

    Thanks in advance, Mike
     
  2. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
    Wow Mike, welcome to the forum, but it sounds like you have lots of opportunity to learn. And this is a good place to start but there is a whole world of tutorials and folks ready to offer advice, but you may have to give us a hint of what type of advice you are hoping to get. Just to get you started I would suggest that you Google the web for tutorials or reviews on your G5.

    Good luck,
     
  3. spatulaboy

    spatulaboy I'm not really here

    Jul 13, 2011
    North Carolina
    Vin
    Welcome Mike! The G5 is a very capable camera, but lenses are the other half of the equation. The two you have are very good for photography in good light, such as outdoors. If you plan on shooting a lot indoors or in poor light, I would look at some of the large aperture lenses available. There are some wonderful lenses available for this system that will really maximize what your camera can do.

    Of course this is all advice about equipment. If you need to understand the fundamentals of photography, then I'll have to charge you. Joking. :wink: There are a lot of very talented photographers on this forum, just ask away!
     
  4. nuclearboy

    nuclearboy Mu-43 Top Veteran

    849
    Jan 28, 2011
    Ellicott City, MD
    Chris
    You have the zooms covered for good light situations like the other post stated. I would try to get a fast lens to play with and see if that opens up some opportunities for you in lower light or indoor(no flash) situations.

    I recommend the Panasonic 20mm because it is relatively cheap and has great image quality. If you find one for the going price (say $275), you will be in good shape. If you end up not liking it, sell it for about the same price and you will be richer for the experience.

    rinse and repeat...
     
  5. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
  6. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Bob
    Welcome to the forum!
     
  7. dymond2102

    dymond2102 New to Mu-43

    3
    Jun 18, 2013
    Chelmsford, Essex
    Well I feel welcomed!

    Hi all - thanks so much for the responses!

    Well I tend to favour landscape photography and architecture. I also have a preference for black and white as I think this provides a far more dramatic contrast. I actually have a weeks holiday in Cornwall at the start of July and so I am hoping to have some good opportunities to test the camera out with the lenses I have (and likely come up with more questions!).

    Nuclearboy - I had looked at the 20mm lens and heard that the image quality is good. Do you think the quality would remain if I were to crop photos? I considered buying the 14-140mm lens but at this early stage was a bit put off by the price tag - maybe in a year or so....

    Thanks all for the tips on where to look for advice too. I have found a few good tutorials on youtube but will also look elsewhere.

    As you might have all guessed I am new to this and so starting from the basics - bear with me!
     
  8. nuclearboy

    nuclearboy Mu-43 Top Veteran

    849
    Jan 28, 2011
    Ellicott City, MD
    Chris
    The 20mm is a decent all around lens and is reasonable for some architecture shots. Going wider is typical for architecture (something like the 12mm or 14mm) but I would still strongly consider the 20mm when you are ready for more light than your kit zooms can provide. You can use the 14mm end of the kit zoom for most of your architecture anyway.

    As far as quality remaining after cropping the photos.... That depens on your intended use and how much you crop the photo. A digital photograph is simply an array of individual pixels (a checkerboard) which are each at a single color but together they form the photo. If you have one of the 12M sensors it has 12 million pixels and forms a 4032 x 3024 array. When you crop, you have to think about how many pixels you are left with and what you want to do with it. For email and facebook, 800 pixels of width is plenty. A good high resolution screen image might be 1600 pixels wide. For printing, however, you generally want a large number of pixels and the quality will be reduced if you crop the image too far.

    If the original 4032x3024 image could be printed at 20x16 inches, then if you cut it in half (pixel dimension wise to 2016x1508), you would get the same print quality on a 10 x 8 inch print.

    So cropping is fine but you cannot crop down to 10% of the original pixel count and then expect to print a poster with good results. There are some good guidelines on this at many of the online printing websites and soem of your own trial and error may be needed.

    Have fun.
     
  9. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Mu-43 Top Veteran

    651
    Mar 21, 2013
    N Essex, UK
    Mike
    Hi Mike and welcome from another Mike in Essex! The forum's friendly & covers a very diverse range without quite getting to busy to keep up with.

    IMHO The G series cameras are (even more than micro 4/3 in general) ideal for adapted lenses as well as the excellent native lenses. But perhaps if you've come from a point & shoot it might be best to leave the added complication of manual focusing until a little later.
    My current favorite lenses (cheap c-mounts) would be of little use for your prefered subjects anyway - they get very soft at the edges so are more suited for macro & dreamy portraits.
     
  10. Iansky

    Iansky Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 26, 2009
    The Cotswolds, UK
    Welcome Mike,

    You have joined a great forum full of Mu43 Afficionados who are all willing to help.

    It sounds like you have a good range of focal lengths covered with your current optics and as others have mentioned, there are many posts on here you should find usefuly.

    There has been mixed feeling about the Pany 14-42 and I had one of the early versions that had numerous issues so ended up going back, I understand they have since corrected those and it is now a good little performer.

    If you predominantly lean toward landscape work, you may want to consider a wide angle prime lens and there are numerous choices around that offer good value for money one of them being the Pany 14mm that has certainly become more readily available as a good quality used product at a sensible price ( Mathers of Lancashire - Mathers of Lancashire - Panasonic G-Series Lenses for example have a Pany 14mm f2.5 for £189 so a good choice).

    Depending on how much you like editing, I have personally found that NIK Silver Efex Pro2 is a superb B&W conversion package that produces amazing results that can be tweaked to suit, they do offer a trial version that is worth playing with.

    Good luck and again, welcome to the land of hope and glory.
     
  11. dymond2102

    dymond2102 New to Mu-43

    3
    Jun 18, 2013
    Chelmsford, Essex
    Hi all.

    Nuclearboy - Thanks for the advice on cropping. That makes a lot of sense. At the moment I only print pictures on 8x12" at the most so I'll bear that all in mind when I crop. I've also found that a lot of the print services warn you if the pixel count is too low which is handy!

    Hi Mike - yes the forum seems like just the place to learn and pick up pointers. I've only been on a few days and already had some great advice! What do you mean when you say adapted lenses? Are these the DSLR lenses but adapted to fit m4/3's?

    Hi Ian - thanks, I'm currently weighing up the 14mm and 20mm and trying to choose between the two. I think I might experiment a bit more with what I have first and then make the step. I must admit I've never used any software to edit my photos but now that I've stepped up a level (equipment-wise at least!) I think I'll take a look.

    Thanks again everyone!
     
  12. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Mu-43 Top Veteran

    651
    Mar 21, 2013
    N Essex, UK
    Mike
    Well DSLR/SLR/rangefinder/CCTV... lenses. There's an adapter available for just about all camera lenses. All are manual so it's best to get to grips with the rest of your changes before trying them.
     
  13. spatulaboy

    spatulaboy I'm not really here

    Jul 13, 2011
    North Carolina
    Vin