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New Technology and Old Technology Clash

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by Empireme, Jul 4, 2015.

  1. Empireme

    Empireme Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Aug 25, 2011
    LA, CA
    I purchased an OMD EM1 and was super super excited to check out the pictures in Lightroom. It's been several years since I've had a new camera body - just sold the GH2. But it seems that LightRoom 3 doesn't support OMD EM1's raw files...

    What can I do to resolve this? I heard Lightroom now is a monthly or yearly paid subscription?
     
  2. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Three options, the first two being free:

    1. You can use the Olympus software that came with the camera (olympus viewer).
    2. You can download the latest DNG converter and convert your Olympus RAW files into DNG. These DNG files are compatible with older versions of Lightroom and Photoshop.
    3. Purchase the latest Lightroom version, either standalone for about $150 or as part of the $10 a month Photoshop/LR subscription.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    You have a couple of choices. LR 6 is not subscription, but it does have a new activation/registration scheme. Or, you can use Adobes's stand-alone DNG converter and convert your raw files. I believe that LR 3.x should be able to read those DNG files. given the number of changes from LR3 onwards, you may want to consider an upgrade if your hardware can support it.

    Good luck,

    --Ken
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Or you could use rawtherapee or darktable ...

    Barry
     
  5. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    Adobe does not provide updates to non-current versions of Lightroom or Adobe Camera RAW/Photoshop for cameras released after a new version of those programs is released. Once your Adobe software is superseded by a new version you are going to have to update that software to the latest version if you buy a new camera body. It's as simple as that.

    The Adobe workaround is converting your RAW files from the new camera to DNG format and your current software will work with the DNG files. Adobe's DNG Converter utility is a free download.

    The only other software I have experience with are Apple's iPhoto, Aperture, and the latest Photos application. The situation with them is different. The RAW conversion engine is built into the Mac OS so you can use those applications, including Aperture which has now been discontinued, with new camera bodies for as long as the version of the OS which you are using keeps getting RAW camera updates. At some stage Apple will no longer issue those updates for your version of the OS if you don't keep your OS up to date and then you're faced with the same problem but the difference is that you're going to have to update the OS rather than the processing software. Apple have said that Aperture will continue to work with the current version of the OS but it may not be supported by future versions of the OS. Photos, their current processing app, is a replacement for iPhoto and doesn't have anywhere near the functionality of either Aperture or Lightroom so it isn't an option in my view. Aperture could replace LR3 but it's Mac only which isn't a help to you if you use a PC, and Aperture is also no longer available for sale but you may be able to acquire a copy from somewhere, or someone, if you use a Mac. Sooner or later you'll run up against the same problem if you go that route.

    I don't know about other processing applications but while you may be able to find an application which solves your problem at the moment, the unfortunate truth is that all solutions are temporary. If you don't upgrade your software, whatever application it is, at some point the developer of that application is going to stop providing updates which add new cameras to that version of the software. Alternatively, whatever OS you use is going to be updated and the new OS version will not be compatible with your processing software and you're going to be faced with the need to update both OS and processing software. That problem is likely to become an issue with Adobe's DNG converter at some stage in time as your computer's OS gets upgraded. You'll reach a point where a new version of DNG converter is needed for the new version of the OS and at that point Adobe is likely to stop issuing updates for new cameras for your version of DNG converter.

    Sooner or later, no matter what option you choose, you're going to have to face the fact that you won't be able to process RAW files from a new camera with your existing software and either an application upgrade, an operating system upgrade, or both are going to be required. LR6 has a lot of new features and performance improvements over LR3. Bite the bullet and upgrade because sooner or later you're going to have to anyway.
     
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  6. Jfrader

    Jfrader Guest

    One of the few things I miss from my old Pentax system was the capability to set the camera to record Raw files in either PEF or DNG in-camera. That made things much simpler when dealing with changing versions. I wish Olympus would offer that option but suspect I am dreaming to even hope.
     
  7. Empireme

    Empireme Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Aug 25, 2011
    LA, CA
    David A. Thanks for laying it down! I purchased Light room 6 soon after reading your post.
     
  8. CWRailman

    CWRailman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    562
    Jun 2, 2015
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Denny
    Here’s how that works. You buy the latest version of Lightroom then you find that your machine does not have the resources to properly operate the new version so then you go buy a new machine at a cost of $400.

    Then you find that the operating system on the new machine does not operate the older versions of software that you use/rely upon so you now have to go out and repurchase and reload the software that you normally use for personal or business at a cost of $200-$8,000 ( yes $8,000 if you are like me and have licensed copies of very expensive CAD software programs that you still use.)

    This is all from personal experience hence the reason I opted for Lightroom 5.0 which has now been upgraded to 5.7.

    IMHO, it’s much less frustrating to find a way to work with what you currently have such as using a free converter. It puts a lot less stress on your wallet. And yes, the ability of saving RAW in Adobe friendly formats is one significant benefit that Pentax offers.
     
  9. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    621
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    Correct, except:

    #2 should mention the even with this method, Lr3 users like the OP are limited to the earlier RAW conversion engine used in Lr1-3 and not the newer much improved conversion engine used in Lr4-6 & LrCC.

    #3 should include mention that Lr6, the stand alone perpetual license version, is also available at a discounted upgrade price (~$80USD) for legitimate owners of any earlier version of Lr.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    621
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    +1

    It's now a FOL (Fact Of Life) that any new digital camera purchase requires a review of your image handling software and will likely require some upgrade to software and occasionally hardware. This needs to be figured into the cost of ownership of the camera when making purchasing decisions.
     
  11. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I just always use the free raw converters, so I don't think buying Lightroom is a fact of life.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. CWRailman

    CWRailman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    562
    Jun 2, 2015
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Denny
    Actually JPG engines are getting so good and you can do almost as much in PP with a JPG file as a RAW file that in the near future, for most applications, RAW may become a thing of the past.
     
  13. m4/3boy

    m4/3boy Mu-43 Veteran

    306
    Jul 21, 2013
    Sorry no you don't know what you are talking about.
     
  14. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    While you can tune your camera's jpeg rendering and shoot a spot-on image SOOC, not unlike how we used to shoot transparencies, I am not of the opinion that a jpeg file will render nearly as much as a raw file in post processing. There are just too many setting that are "baked in" to a jpeg file that greatly restrict its post processing capabilities.

    --Ken