Review New Oly 100-400: Impressions and images

RAH

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Dec 1, 2013
Messages
1,431
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New Hampshire
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Rich
He shows what he say...100% captures, the hole frames without any crop.

Not 100% as in full size images or 100% crops.
Ah, OK, I see what you mean. To paraphrase W.C. Fields, I'll pardon his redundancy - he could have simply said that the images are not cropped. That 100% talk threw me off. Certainly it's his prerogative, I just couldn't figure out what he meant.
 

tiago.ereira

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
May 8, 2016
Messages
68
Just to give an update on my situation.
I have contacted the shop where I got my lens so they could give a look on the rotation issue. Passed there last Friday and I was told (as expected) that this is normal and happens in another lenses and systems.
By coincidence, at the same time there was another Olympus shooter in the shop (first time I see one in the wild) and he has the same lens. He showed me that he had the same issue but he didn’t care and was shooting normally in the great irish weather with no problems.

At that moment I realized that, there was no way I could get my situation sorted. Even if I insist with the seller to refund me or send my lens to repair or replace it, the chances of getting one exactly with the same problem are very high according to all reports online and my personal experience on Friday.

Even if not happy (I still believe a lens that cost 1300€ should not show that behavior) I came home and started thinking on another solution.

I decided to do a bit of DIY (again, ridiculous that I need to do that on an expensive lens).
Lens mount unmodified (the problem is that big gap, larger than the camera mount pin):
B2090929-F654-4DA6-9929-3768473ABEE9.jpeg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

I decided to precisely insert a bit of tape on the gap so make it thinner and reduce the rotation.
Lens mount after modification:
9C6D81EA-EE4C-43A9-8369-111A1F2B4680.jpeg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

There is two layers of tape there. Tried to put a third one but the pin would not fix so I had to take it out. With two layer the rotation ins still there but less evident and there is no metallic noise anymore as you can see on this video:

Not ideal but there is a good improvement.

After a terrible day yesterday, I tried my first shoot on a less bad weather.
Very dark and misty weather but got some test shots.

This were the conditions (IPhone picture)
F8A80B0F-07E0-4D0C-B7E7-50BBF7B6788B.jpeg
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Now some details from the other side of the river.
5046F450-F54C-44A0-9C37-64FF5A57357E.jpeg
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0AABB305-3436-4E00-A0E3-5CC364D7EC95.jpeg
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6553A1D7-1825-4960-8689-6689B8D12964.jpeg
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8A0AE1B5-8EAA-409B-966F-BB981F4E906D.jpeg
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To finish, some shoots during a walk by the river.
8388F6D1-9296-4AF6-8A03-D3B0A91A7763.jpeg
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Photo is blurred but liked the colors and the bokeh. A good example of the consequences on a low shutter speed.

8DC48C36-AA5F-4F86-9C6F-B65D39FDE02B.jpeg
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96BA3AE4-AB7C-47BF-93B5-829410D2094A.jpeg
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I like the composition and the almost black and white effect on this one. The focus is not on the bird though.

All photos are jpegs SOOC taken with my EM1.2

My thoughts comparing with the 75-300.

Way heavier. I could walk all day with my 75-300 in casual walks but after a couple of hours with this one I was not comfortable anymore, so they are to completely different lens on this regard. I would not bring this one with me for a casual walk. I was planning to sell my 75-300 but I need to think better.

Apart from that, the 100-400 has big advantages. Even in these bad conditions which forced me to work always on the limit of shutter speed and ISO (visible on the pictures), I could get very decent shots.

Stabilization is a big plus here and even if not syncing with the body, it has clear advantage over the IBIS only with the 75-300. When the subject doesn’t move it‘s possible to get sharp photos at low shutter speeds easily.

The lens at 400 is sharp. With some practice I got very nice shots with my 75-300 (I shared a few on its respective thread), but at 300 the quality is noticeable lower.
With the 100-400 the quality looks perfect at 400mm and the extra reach helps a lot.

I don’t use set ups for bird photography (yet). I normally walk to locations where birds are and slowly approach them to get the shots. I understand the behavior of the birds and could normally get close enough to get an OK shoot with the 75-300, but I always needed an extra couple of steps to get the bird to fill more of the frame and I step forward the bird just flew away. With the 100-400 I can get the bird to fill enough of the frame keeping that safety distance (chaffinch and wagtail photos). This will avoid some crop on post processing and quality will suffer less.

The bokeh is great. A lot better than the 75-300. Autofocus areas look smooth. A good surprise knowing that the aperture is not that different.

Also tested the minimum focus distance and it works great (flower photo). As a close up/macro enthusiast this is a big plus. I’m afraid my 60mm f2.8 macro will leave the bag even less than before. Can’t wait to try this in Portugal with some butterflies and dragonflies next summer.

The autofocus seems faster than the 75-300. Tried some birds in fly and it acquired focus quickly but I have no decent shoots to share (not enough light to keep shutter speed up so they were blurred)

Having weather sealing in the Irish weather is a big plus. It gives me peace of mind when walking outside on a day like today. I know that if it starts raining I don’t need to run to the car or hide the camera underneath the jacket.

Final thoughts:

Cons:
- Mount rotation ( this should not be accepted as normal. That insert should be narrower. If I can fix it with a bit of tape, precision machines could easily do a better job)
- Bigger and heavier than what I thought. Not a replacement for the 75-300. Being this big it could be at least f5.6 at 300mm
-Zoom is bit stiff. It’s hard to get a smooth zoom across the range.

Pros:
-Stabilization is decent. Easy shoots at 1/100. Probably a lot lower being carefully and using some handhold techniques.
-Amazing range.
-Very good quality at 400mm

Overall, I would highly recommend this lens to everyone on m43 system that wants the big range but cannot afford to spend 7000€ on the 150-400 pro.

Can’t wait for a sunny day to get some great shots.
 
Last edited:

Quadna71

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
May 25, 2016
Messages
503
Location
Delaware, USA
In regards to the radial scratches on the entrance ramp leading to the electrical contacts...were those the result of troubleshooting to find the source of the play in the mount? I’ve not seen those similar scratches on any of my lenses.
 

tiago.ereira

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
May 8, 2016
Messages
68
In regards to the radial scratches on the entrance ramp leading to the electrical contacts...were those the result of troubleshooting to find the source of the play in the mount? I’ve not seen those similar scratches on any of my lenses.
Probably a consequence of to much rotation?? I haven’t done anything to the lens.
I did not troubleshoot as it was very clear for me at the beginning the source of the rotation. That insert on the lens mount it’s just to large for the camera pin.

This is one of the reasons I still don’t like that rotation. It might not affect the quality of image now but it will certainly wear the mount parts quickly. Anyone who understands a bit of mechanics knows that friction will cause damage overtime. On the contacts, on the mount and on the seal ring.

This lens was bought new last Tuesday.
 

Ross the fiddler

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
May 20, 2012
Messages
4,237
Location
Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia
Real Name
Ross
Just to give an update on my situation.
I have contacted the shop where I got my lens so they could give a look on the rotation issue. Passed there last Friday and I was told (as expected) that this is normal and happens in another lenses and systems.
By coincidence, at the same time there was another Olympus shooter in the shop (first time I see one in the wild) and he has the same lens. He showed me that he had the same issue but he didn’t care and was shooting normally in the great irish weather with no problems.

At that moment I realized that, there was no way I could get my situation sorted. Even if I insist with the seller to refund me or send my lens to repair or replace it, the chances of getting one exactly with the same problem are very high according to all reports online and my personal experience on Friday.

Even if not happy (I still believe a lens that cost 1300€ should not show that behavior) I came home and started thinking on another solution.

I decided to do a bit of DIY (again, ridiculous that I need to do that on an expensive lens).
Lens mount unmodified (the problem is that big gap, larger than the camera mount pin):
View attachment 860524
I decided to precisely insert a bit of tape on the gap so make it thinner and reduce the rotation.
Lens mount after modification:
View attachment 860525
There is two layers of tape there. Tried to put a third one but the pin would not fix so I had to take it out. With two layer the rotation ins still there but less evident and there is no metallic noise anymore as you can see on this video:

Not ideal but there is a good improvement.

After a terrible day yesterday, I tried my first shoot on a less bad weather.
Very dark and misty weather but got some test shots.

This were the conditions (IPhone picture)
View attachment 860526
Now some details from the other side of the river.
View attachment 860528View attachment 860529View attachment 860530View attachment 860531

To finish, some shoots during a walk by the river.
View attachment 860532
Photo is blurred but liked the colors and the bokeh. A good example of the consequences on a low shutter speed.

View attachment 860533View attachment 860534View attachment 860535View attachment 860536
I like the composition and the almost black and white effect on this one. The focus is not on the bird though.

All photos are jpegs SOOC taken with my EM1.2

My thoughts comparing with the 75-300.

Way heavier. I could walk all day with my 75-300 in casual walks but after a couple of hours with this one I was not comfortable anymore, so they are to completely different lens on this regard. I would not bring this one with me for a casual walk. I was planning to sell my 75-300 but I need to think better.

Apart from that, the 100-400 has big advantages. Even in these bad conditions which forced me to work always on the limit of shutter speed and ISO (visible on the pictures), I could get very decent shots.

Stabilization is a big plus here and even if not syncing with the body, it has clear advantage over the IBIS only with the 75-300. When the subject doesn’t move it‘s possible to get sharp photos at low shutter speeds easily.

The lens at 400 is sharp. With some practice I got very nice shots with my 75-300 (I shared a few on its respective thread), but at 300 the quality is noticeable lower.
With the 100-400 the quality looks perfect at 400mm and the extra reach helps a lot.

I don’t use set ups for bird photography (yet). I normally walk to locations where birds are and slowly approach them to get the shots. I understand the behavior of the birds and could normally get close enough to get an OK shoot with the 75-300, but I always needed an extra couple of steps to get the bird to fill more of the frame and I step forward the bird just flew away. With the 100-400 I can get the bird to fill enough of the frame keeping that safety distance (chaffinch and wagtail photos). This will avoid some crop on post processing and quality will suffer less.

The bokeh is great. A lot better than the 75-300. Autofocus areas look smooth. A good surprise knowing that the aperture is not that different.

Also tested the minimum focus distance and it works great (flower photo). As a close up/macro enthusiast this is a big plus. I’m afraid my 60mm f2.8 macro will leave the bag even less than before. Can’t wait to try this in Portugal with some butterflies and dragonflies next summer.

The autofocus seems faster than the 75-300. Tried some birds in fly and it acquired focus quickly but I have no decent shoots to share (not enough light to keep shutter speed up so they were blurred)

Having weather sealing in the Irish weather is a big plus. It gives me peace of mind when walking outside on a day like today. I know that if it starts raining I don’t need to run to the car or hide the camera underneath the jacket.

Final thoughts:

Cons:
- Mount rotation ( this should not be accepted as normal. That insert should be narrower. If I can fix it with a bit of tape, precision machines could easily do a better job)
- Bigger and heavier than what I thought. Not a replacement for the 75-300. Being this big it could be at least f5.6 at 300mm
-Zoom is bit stiff. It’s hard to get a smooth zoom across the range.

Pros:
-Stabilization is decent. Easy shoots at 1/100. Probably a lot lower being carefully and using some handhold techniques.
-Amazing range.
-Very good quality at 400mm

Overall, I would highly recommend this lens to everyone on m43 system that wants the big range but cannot afford to spend 7000€ on the 150-400 pro.

Can’t wait for a sunny day to get some great shots.
Great photos & glad you've come to realise, this is how the lens has been made, even if you're not happy about the size of the locking pin hole. My guess is they decided they decided to make that a replaceable piece so that it can be replaced if worn excessively (or other manufacturing reason). The weight of the lens is probably greater because it is a Sigma lens elements design that was used for their DSLR lens (Sigma, Canon & Nikon) & also I would think the OIS would be the same as that used in that lens too, to keep costs down for this lens, being in the lower range, although with weather sealing & also being compatible with the teleconverters. I'm very happy with it but only received mine on Friday prior to a very hot 40c weekend (no birds ventured out from their cooler retreats), so I took some photos of cicadas instead with small crops to show how much detail is still possible.
On Sunday I tried for photos of passing waterbombing choppers too.
 

Ross the fiddler

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Messages
4,237
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Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia
Real Name
Ross
A cooler day brought Rainbow Lorikeets to our Red Flowering Gum tree, E-M1 II & 100-400 lens. All photos are original size in Flickr so smaller sizes means it was cropped.
Here is the full image.
50663706113_b4966f2a8b_b.jpg
KB302432-adj
by Ross, on Flickr

And a crop of it.
50663702898_a33f630e99_b.jpg
KB302432-cr
by Ross, on Flickr

50664443906_37959ce235_b.jpg
KB302458-cr
by Ross, on Flickr

A portrait crop.
50664521872_0a79837b76_b.jpg
KB302436-cr
by Ross, on Flickr

:drinks:
 
Last edited:

tiago.ereira

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
May 8, 2016
Messages
68
A cooler day brought Rainbow Lorikeets to our Red Flowering Gum tree, E-M1 II & 100-400 lens. All photos are original size in Flickr so smaller sizes means it was cropped.
Here is the full image.
View attachment 860603
KB302432-adj by Ross, on Flickr

And a crop of it.
View attachment 860604
KB302432-cr by Ross, on Flickr

View attachment 860610
KB302458-cr by Ross, on Flickr

A portrait crop.
View attachment 860611
KB302436-cr by Ross, on Flickr

:drinks:
Great pictures! I’m jealous of that light ( and those birds) but unfortunately I will need to wait a few months before a proper sunlight hit this country and will be lucky if I get a boring grey bird on the frame.

@tiago.ereira , nice pictures and nice review! I am wondering, on the IS, do you have both the lens and the IBIS turned on? I think you do, but just want to know for sure.
Thank you. Yes they were both on and the results are great. I did not try any crazy test on that. I was just walking and taking some snapshots. Not even using trees or walls as support. I believe great results can be obtained with proper technique and, of course, the subject stays still.

The lens will be almost useless until springtime but could not resist to get this last one in stock. We might have some nice cold and sunny mornings during the winter here.
 

PhotoCal

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Aug 18, 2020
Messages
241
Just to give an update on my situation.
I have contacted the shop where I got my lens so they could give a look on the rotation issue. Passed there last Friday and I was told (as expected) that this is normal and happens in another lenses and systems.
By coincidence, at the same time there was another Olympus shooter in the shop (first time I see one in the wild) and he has the same lens. He showed me that he had the same issue but he didn’t care and was shooting normally in the great irish weather with no problems.

At that moment I realized that, there was no way I could get my situation sorted. Even if I insist with the seller to refund me or send my lens to repair or replace it, the chances of getting one exactly with the same problem are very high according to all reports online and my personal experience on Friday.

Even if not happy (I still believe a lens that cost 1300€ should not show that behavior) I came home and started thinking on another solution.

I decided to do a bit of DIY (again, ridiculous that I need to do that on an expensive lens).
Lens mount unmodified (the problem is that big gap, larger than the camera mount pin):
View attachment 860524
I decided to precisely insert a bit of tape on the gap so make it thinner and reduce the rotation.
Lens mount after modification:
View attachment 860525
There is two layers of tape there. Tried to put a third one but the pin would not fix so I had to take it out. With two layer the rotation ins still there but less evident and there is no metallic noise anymore as you can see on this video:

Not ideal but there is a good improvement.

After a terrible day yesterday, I tried my first shoot on a less bad weather.
Very dark and misty weather but got some test shots.

This were the conditions (IPhone picture)
View attachment 860526
Now some details from the other side of the river.
View attachment 860528View attachment 860529View attachment 860530View attachment 860531

To finish, some shoots during a walk by the river.
View attachment 860532
Photo is blurred but liked the colors and the bokeh. A good example of the consequences on a low shutter speed.

View attachment 860533View attachment 860534View attachment 860535View attachment 860536
I like the composition and the almost black and white effect on this one. The focus is not on the bird though.

All photos are jpegs SOOC taken with my EM1.2

My thoughts comparing with the 75-300.

Way heavier. I could walk all day with my 75-300 in casual walks but after a couple of hours with this one I was not comfortable anymore, so they are to completely different lens on this regard. I would not bring this one with me for a casual walk. I was planning to sell my 75-300 but I need to think better.

Apart from that, the 100-400 has big advantages. Even in these bad conditions which forced me to work always on the limit of shutter speed and ISO (visible on the pictures), I could get very decent shots.

Stabilization is a big plus here and even if not syncing with the body, it has clear advantage over the IBIS only with the 75-300. When the subject doesn’t move it‘s possible to get sharp photos at low shutter speeds easily.

The lens at 400 is sharp. With some practice I got very nice shots with my 75-300 (I shared a few on its respective thread), but at 300 the quality is noticeable lower.
With the 100-400 the quality looks perfect at 400mm and the extra reach helps a lot.

I don’t use set ups for bird photography (yet). I normally walk to locations where birds are and slowly approach them to get the shots. I understand the behavior of the birds and could normally get close enough to get an OK shoot with the 75-300, but I always needed an extra couple of steps to get the bird to fill more of the frame and I step forward the bird just flew away. With the 100-400 I can get the bird to fill enough of the frame keeping that safety distance (chaffinch and wagtail photos). This will avoid some crop on post processing and quality will suffer less.

The bokeh is great. A lot better than the 75-300. Autofocus areas look smooth. A good surprise knowing that the aperture is not that different.

Also tested the minimum focus distance and it works great (flower photo). As a close up/macro enthusiast this is a big plus. I’m afraid my 60mm f2.8 macro will leave the bag even less than before. Can’t wait to try this in Portugal with some butterflies and dragonflies next summer.

The autofocus seems faster than the 75-300. Tried some birds in fly and it acquired focus quickly but I have no decent shoots to share (not enough light to keep shutter speed up so they were blurred)

Having weather sealing in the Irish weather is a big plus. It gives me peace of mind when walking outside on a day like today. I know that if it starts raining I don’t need to run to the car or hide the camera underneath the jacket.

Final thoughts:

Cons:
- Mount rotation ( this should not be accepted as normal. That insert should be narrower. If I can fix it with a bit of tape, precision machines could easily do a better job)
- Bigger and heavier than what I thought. Not a replacement for the 75-300. Being this big it could be at least f5.6 at 300mm
-Zoom is bit stiff. It’s hard to get a smooth zoom across the range.

Pros:
-Stabilization is decent. Easy shoots at 1/100. Probably a lot lower being carefully and using some handhold techniques.
-Amazing range.
-Very good quality at 400mm

Overall, I would highly recommend this lens to everyone on m43 system that wants the big range but cannot afford to spend 7000€ on the 150-400 pro.

Can’t wait for a sunny day to get some great shots.

If I were in your shoes, I'd contact Olympus and request a new lens. At the very least they may explain what you are experiencing, which would be helpful to everyone.

Then, consumers can decide if they can live with this lens.

One issue I had with Panasonic (regarding 100-400 problems) was the lack of communication about the problems. Which is why I gave up and waited for an Olympus. My copy has been great. I want everyone to have a similar experience.

I am keeping my Olympus 75-300 for the reasons you describe. Being able to carry lighter gear is why we all enjoy m43!
 

RAH

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New Hampshire
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Rich
Yes, I agree that the 75-300 is a fantastic walk around wildlife lens, small enough and light enough for even a shrimp like myself. I know some folks wish it had more weight for hand-hold steadiness, but for me it is essentially perfect. The 100-400 (which I am anxiously awaiting - no date yet!) will not really affect my use of the 75-300 much at all.
 

Ross the fiddler

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Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia
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Great pictures! I’m jealous of that light ( and those birds) but unfortunately I will need to wait a few months before a proper sunlight hit this country and will be lucky if I get a boring grey bird on the frame.


Thank you. Yes they were both on and the results are great. I did not try any crazy test on that. I was just walking and taking some snapshots. Not even using trees or walls as support. I believe great results can be obtained with proper technique and, of course, the subject stays still.

The lens will be almost useless until springtime but could not resist to get this last one in stock. We might have some nice cold and sunny mornings during the winter here.
Thanks. They landed in a small tree (2m high) & the branches were moving with them climbing around in it, so a number of frames were blurry from the movement. I was about 3-4m from them & although a faster lens would be better for a faster shutter speed, the shallow DoF is still obvious in the last photo.
You might be jealous of the light, but maybe not of the 40c hot days over the weekend & again today (Tuesday). Monday was a nice cool reprieve.
On Sunday I tried some photos of water bombing helicopters passing to control a bushfire not far away. There is some motion blur & not as sharp as I had hoped. The hot hazy day probably didn't help.

KB292327-s.jpg
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KB292329-s.jpg
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KB292335(CaptOne)adj-cr-s.jpg
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This is well cropped.
KB292342(CaptOne)adj-cr-s.jpg
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Ross the fiddler

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If I were in your shoes, I'd contact Olympus and request a new lens. At the very least they may explain what you are experiencing, which would be helpful to everyone.

Then, consumers can decide if they can live with this lens.

One issue I had with Panasonic (regarding 100-400 problems) was the lack of communication about the problems. Which is why I gave up and waited for an Olympus. My copy has been great. I want everyone to have a similar experience.

I am keeping my Olympus 75-300 for the reasons you describe. Being able to carry lighter gear is why we all enjoy m43!
But..... they're all the same, aren't they? That inset is the determining factor for the amount of movement. Most users have noticed there is some movement. If Olympus saw that photo of the back of the lens they would say it is as it was meant to be (or as they were manufactured). Maybe it might be a case of if enough users complained then they may remanufacture that inset to a slightly smaller width & be replaced under warranty. It should be an easy replacement. I'll get my Vernier calliper out & see if I can measure the difference. Maybe you could take a photo of your lens mount & let us see if there is any difference.
 

Ross the fiddler

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Yes, I agree that the 75-300 is a fantastic walk around wildlife lens, small enough and light enough for even a shrimp like myself. I know some folks wish it had more weight for hand-hold steadiness, but for me it is essentially perfect. The 100-400 (which I am anxiously awaiting - no date yet!) will not really affect my use of the 75-300 much at all.
I had been using the 40-150 Pro lens with the MC20 but as I was waiting for my chest to heal (being wired back together), I dug out my 75-300 lens. I was surprised at the level of quality I could get from it again & I wouldn't get rid of mine either, for that time when I do need something light & smaller. I also modified a 40-150 kit lens hood to fit it too, to keep the size down.
 
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A cooler day brought Rainbow Lorikeets to our Red Flowering Gum tree, E-M1 II & 100-400 lens. All photos are original size in Flickr so smaller sizes means it was cropped.
Here is the full image.
View attachment 860603
KB302432-adj by Ross, on Flickr

And a crop of it.
View attachment 860604
KB302432-cr by Ross, on Flickr

View attachment 860610
KB302458-cr by Ross, on Flickr

A portrait crop.
View attachment 860611
KB302436-cr by Ross, on Flickr

:drinks:
Brilliant, Ross.
 

Ross the fiddler

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I have measured the width of other (pro) lenses & its locking pin hole is approximately 1.99mm while the width of 100-400 lens is 2.00mm.
The pin dia. in my E-M1 II appears to be 1.94mm. Not much to lose sleep over, as far as I'm concerned.
 

davidzvi

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Well I got mine the other day, sadly it's going back. For me it's just too big and heavy.

.....Way heavier. I could walk all day with my 75-300 in casual walks but after a couple of hours with this one I was not comfortable anymore, so they are to completely different lens on this regard. I would not bring this one with me for a casual walk.....
I rarely do dedicated outings, but I thought I might make this work. Now that I have it I'm thinking about alternatives again. I did get a few nice shots and on the last one I didn't even know the deer was there until I aimed the lens at the beaver damn behind it. All full sized images, all hand held, a little processing in LR.

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Shortsonfire79

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170
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Bay Area, California
Way heavier than I was expecting and there is an annoying rotation on the mount. I would say it rotates about 1mm so when I grab the lens with my left hand and the camera with the right hand it feels like they are not properly attached. Anyone with the same issue?
Yes, Exact same issue here. First thing I noticed when I got the lens. The rotation is really jarring when you zoom in and out. The torque required to turn the zoom ring is enough to move the lens-body mount. I shot in pre-sunrise fog for a few days and didn't have any issues.

Stabilization is a big plus here and even if not syncing with the body, it has clear advantage over the IBIS only with the 75-300. When the subject doesn’t move it‘s possible to get sharp photos at low shutter speeds easily.
@tiago.ereira , nice pictures and nice review! I am wondering, on the IS, do you have both the lens and the IBIS turned on? I think you do, but just want to know for sure.
I personally keep both IS and IBIS on even if Oly says it doesn't do anything. I did some sitting-with-elbows-on-table tests and at 400mm dual IS was considerably better than only IS or IBIS.

The lens will be almost useless until springtime but could not resist to get this last one in stock. We might have some nice cold and sunny mornings during the winter here.
I'm the exact opposite! Can't wait for spring. All of the birds have left California for now. And it's too cold for me to want to be out there for more than an hour anyways.

Edit: Sifting through two threads on the same subject is confusing me about what is talked about where.
Does this [Lens rotation] annoyance affect your pictures?
A lens this size needs to be held/carried by the lens, not the body.
I know exactly how to old a lens. Left hand on the lens, right hand on the camera. the problem is that, when I try to twist the zoom with my left hand, the lens rotates (the zoom ring is quit stiff) on the mount (yes, is that bad). There is no need to try to force the rotation as it happens normally when operating the zoom ring and this comes together with a metalic click. Clicks when turning left or right all the time as the lens moves and it feels like the lens is not properly attached to the body.
In my month or two of ownership, I haven't had issue with the lens rotation causing negative issue with BIF or C-AF+T. The lens rotation is most noticeable when I need to quickly go from 100mm to 400mm (or vice versa) with a more forceful turn of the wrist.
 
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PhotoCal

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Aug 18, 2020
Messages
241
Yea, the weight does seem to be lighter when you're reading the specs on a website.
I was birding for a few hours over the weekend and my arm was a little sore. I left the tripod collar at home. D'oh.

I haven't experienced any of the looseness that others have described. I'm sorry to hear about that. My zoom ring is very smooth.

It's important for consumers to provide feedback, especially when there is a concern about the quality. If the company responds it's a good way to get information and decide if you want to exchange the product or bail.
I spend months trying to get a good copy of a competing lens and it was frustrating to not be providing with information other than "try again". So I gave up and waited for the Olympus.
 

Shortsonfire79

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
170
Location
Bay Area, California
Yea, the weight does seem to be lighter when you're reading the specs on a website.
I was birding for a few hours over the weekend and my arm was a little sore. I left the tripod collar at home. D'oh.

I haven't experienced any of the looseness that others have described. I'm sorry to hear about that. My zoom ring is very smooth.

It's important for consumers to provide feedback, especially when there is a concern about the quality. If the company responds it's a good way to get information and decide if you want to exchange the product or bail.
I spend months trying to get a good copy of a competing lens and it was frustrating to not be providing with information other than "try again". So I gave up and waited for the Olympus.
hah I totally agree that it gets heavy. I only have a small gorilla pod so I have to handhold this bad boy for hours. Bringing it on its first backpacking trip in a couple of weeks.

Yeah I should have said something. I'm known to complain a lot/nitpick my gear so I've been trying to tone it down. Fwiw no other issues with this lens. ;) My zoom ring is also very smooth, and way more so when compared to the Pany 100-300ii that I borrowed from a friend; that thing felt sticky.
 

RAH

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Dec 1, 2013
Messages
1,431
Location
New Hampshire
Real Name
Rich
hah I totally agree that it gets heavy. I only have a small gorilla pod so I have to handhold this bad boy for hours. Bringing it on its first backpacking trip in a couple of weeks.
I think that this is one of the best reasons for at least using a monopod. I mean, disregarding the steadiness issue, a monopod serves as a good support for your lens/camera while you're standing around waiting for those rare birds to fly within shooting distance. I think that this is why you see all those sport photographers on the sidelines with their giant lenses and monopods (besides taking up less room than a tripod, of course).
 

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