New Monitor - and I'm a bit overwhelmed...

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Roel
But more back on topic:

Because I am working with a monitor that shows so much more color and detail, how will a processed image translate to someone else who has a more generic monitor?
What I worry is that most of my images could be a bit over processed because I had a 'more generic monitor" until now?
In my experience, most generic monitors/screens are way more bright and vibrant out of the box vs a calibrated generic screen.
A specialized photography monitor like your Benq is after calibration even more well-controlled brightness and colorwise.

As mentioned earlier, when processing for web I always proof view the images on a non calibrated screen and just check how they look.
In my experiences, on a generic out of the box screen, the image will be brighter vs on the calibrated screen (and mostly due to the brightness/saturated color some nuance can be lost). But in general, the image is still comparable colorwise. The extra brightness of generic screens can influence an image and I do go back and change the edit accordingly.
But overall I do not feel that I over/under edit on a calibrated screen for web usage, quite the opposite.

Do make sure that you set the correct Color mode on your screen before you start working on your photos. So in my case, I use "Calibration 1" (AdobeRGB calibration) and "Calibration 2" (sRGB calibration) depending on if I edit for print or web. Preferably use the monitor for +/- 30 minutes (in the mode you will be using) before editing (e.g. importing and culling images) to 1. warm-up the monitor 2. let your eyes get used to the color/brightness level of the photo editing monitor.
 

va3pinner

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Thanks to everyone for their input! It has been very helpful.
At this point, I will just stick to sRBG for the entire process. Camera (Lumix G9) is set for that, My monitor will be set for that, and Darktable should pick it up automatically.
I shoot both RAW and Jpg, and I can always go back and mess around in another color space just to see what happens.
The monitor is supposedly calibrated at the factory, but in time I will calibrate using DisplayCal and a SpyderX both my laptop and the BenQ monitor, but for right now I'm just going to run with things as-is, and get used to seeing a lot more detail than previously. Darktable will allow me to output to 16 bit TIFF files and I may do both jpg and TIFF just to see the difference.
Any further suggestions and comments are welcome! This is a lot for an old film guy to wrap his balding head around!
Bruce
 
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The factory calibration is indeed very goo

If you get a monitor calibration tool keep in mind to use the hardware calibration option (using the BenQ palette master) on the BenQ this will provide the best results.

I can indeed recommend DisplayCal for your laptop display (or any display that doesn’t support hardware calibration). DisplayCal is in my experience superior to other calibration software.

In this case you do not rely on the software of the calibration tool and could also pick up a much cheaper tool (e.g. older model Spyder / xRite).
 
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va3pinner

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The factory calibration is indeed very goo

If you get a monitor calibration tool keep in mind to use the hardware calibration option (using the BenQ palette master) on the BenQ this will provide the best results.

I can indeed recommend DisplayCal for your laptop display (or any display that doesn’t support hardware calibration). DisplayCal is in my experience superior to other calibration software.

In this case you do not rely on the software of the calibration tool and could also pick up a much cheaper tool (e.g. older model Spyder / xRite).
Thanks for the suggestion, but I use Linux as my OS, and BenQ palette master doesn't support Linux, so the hardware calibration is not an option for me
 

Replytoken

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A couple of things to remember. Raw files are not impacted by the color space that you set in your camera, so you are correct that you can work on them at any point in any space that your software supports. And, there is no benefit in saving an 8-bit jpeg file as a 16-bit tiff. If for some reason you want to convert a jpeg to a tiff, you might as well save it as an 8-bit tiff.

Good luck,

--Ken
 
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