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Near enough is good enough

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by OzRay, Jan 29, 2015.

  1. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    Following on from the thread about the Australian Open and use of photographers, Petapixel had another article about non-professional photography being used in a newspaper, this time on the front page. I think that this is a sign of the times where 'near enough is good enough' for many media organisations that previously prided themselves in high quality results (I guess it goes with the often extremely poor spelling and grammar, as well as fact checking, you now see in newspapers).

    The interesting thing with using Instagram photos and the like is how are newspapers validating whether the photos represent fact? There has been discussion here already that photo-journalism requires photographs that haven't been manipulated in any way, but if newspapers are crowdsourcing photos, then I think this concept has gone out the window. Not only are newspapers willing to accept what is often poor quality results, they now appear to accept manipulated (or potentially manipulated) photographs as well. Clearly this is the way things will head in future, and if mistakes are made, the papers will claim innocence and keep rolling on.

    I guess this decline has been evident for some time.
     
  2. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    But isn't that retro filter cool!! :dash2:

    --Ken
     
  3. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    SI laying off its remaining staff photographers pretty much said it all to me. That magazine was all about the images.
     
  4. goldenlight

    goldenlight Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 30, 2010
    Essex
    John
    I think that newspapers are inclined to cut corners in any way they can these days to save money. This is against a background of falling circulation, less income and tighter margins. Quality has been sacrificed and as for the truth, why let it get in the way of a good story?
     
  5. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    Maybe this is how amateurs will finally be able to take long lenses to sports matches, as that's how they'll get their next generation of photos. No need to pay anyone, just give an small acknowledgement.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    maybe its more like a variation on the million monkeys at typewriters producing shakespear

    the general public is increasingly equipped with top shelf cameras and so even without a clue someone is probably going to get a good shot
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    It seems that anything in the media these days has a half-life of about an hour at best. People are so bombarded with information that it seems like there is no time or inclination to focus on a quality experience. Absorb it and move on. It is like we have all stopped sitting down at the end of the day for dinner and are now just drinking Red Bull and/or coffee so we can (quickly) move on to the next thing. Very sad.

    --Ken
     
  8. GBarrington

    GBarrington Mu-43 Veteran

    Maybe we'll see the development of a "Pro" smartphone with clip on interchangeable lenses, huge memory, external microphone port and built in upload to major news outlets.
     
  9. DoofClenas

    DoofClenas Who needs a Mirror!

    938
    Nov 9, 2012
    Traverse City, MI
    Clint
    If you're referring to swimsuits, then yes, you're right ;-)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    They'll probably issue Google type glasses for a select group of supporters and simply download the live video for their use. That might also make the camera operators redundant as well.
     
  11. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    They did have the occasional sports image.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. GBarrington

    GBarrington Mu-43 Veteran

    Little tank treads and an RC controller would be cool. Then the Art director wouldn't even have to sweet-talk some dope into giving his stuff away!
     
  13. jeffryscott

    jeffryscott Mu-43 Top Veteran

    505
    Jul 2, 2010
    Arizona
    I was in the newspaper business for 25 years and watched its decline from the inside. Went back to school and got into a medical field and survived three rounds of layoffs and watched as the photo staff of 15 I was part of for 15 years dwindled to five. I think the only reason I survived is they knew I was leaving and they wouldn't need to pay a severance when I left.

    With rare exceptions, the colleagues I worked with in those years prided themselves with trying to be fair and reporting/photographing accurately. It saddens me to see what passes as news, and what passes as journalism today. Using crowd sourced content is increasing and rather scary. It is one thing if a major breaking news event is photographed by an onlooker, that is fairly easy to verify. But with photo manipulation as easy as it is today, and there being no ethics of cloning, setting up, creating images, how do we trust what is presented is even real?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    As I mentioned earlier, I think the decline in journalism standards (grammar, spelling, accuracy etc) were forebears to the decline of the newspaper (print or online). The local newspaper that I work for, as a filthy contractor, is mostly staffed by not so young volunteers who pride themselves especially in grammar and spelling, but they all come from an era when the 'Three Rs' were considered the most important aspect of education. I now see Twitter quotes filling in articles, in some of our major newspapers, as if such comments in some way enhance or validate the article, or reduces the journalists need for writing.

    The same appears to be happening with supporting photographs, with newspapers seeking people's input constantly to fill in stories. In some cases I can see justification for this, as photographers can't be everywhere and cameras are as common as the proverbial nowadays. But when staff photographers are laid off and articles are supported by photographs sourced from the lowest common denominator, then it's a spiral to the bottom. What seems especially odd is that in the film days, photographers simply took the shots, gave the film rolls to the processors, the film was processed/printed/selected by compositors and sub-editors and then converted ready to print. We no longer have any of the middlemen/women, as the photographer does all the processing/selecting/captioning and the digital images are ready for digital printing, which has saved enormous resources.

    I wonder how much more can be removed?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  15. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    anyone buying the newspaper....
     
  16. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    Actually, it's still the top selling paper. It just shows where we are headed.
     
  17. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    Indeed, I was just taking the idea of what else could be removed to its logical end point. I reckon newspapers are nearing end of life with just supermarket end rubbish likely to be the last man standing.

    :)
     
  18. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    Too true. Surprisingly, it seems that regional newspapers appear to be the last bastion of a foregone era.
     
  19. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-31072006

    The thing which amazes me is that it's not only newspapers that are doing it, it seems like everyone is using other peoples images without fully checking the background on them.

    In regard to news it seems to me that fact checking the original has taken a backseat to expediency as the attention span of the public is so short that they've moved on and forgotten about the subject before a correction or retraction can be issued anyway. It almost feels like getting something wrong out quickly is worth it, even if huge errors become apparent down the line. If you don't get at something (even wrong) out quickly then someone else will publish it as fact and you're losing potential readers. Rumor becomes fact, once enough sources are reporting the same line it won't matter that it's wrong down the road because everyone was wrong.

    It's less like a race to the bottom and more like train derailment in progress. In a race the marshals could step in and stop it, when a train derails all of the following carriages just keep pushing forwards off the tracks and there's nothing anyone can do. I think people are slowly waking up that something is bad happening however it's gained too much inertia and no matter how much people push back it's going to keep going 'forward'.
     
  20. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I remember when doing my trade with them how they were trying to cut costs & improve efficiency & I got out before hot metal typesetting was finished (just). :rolleyes: