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ND Filter question

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Hyubie, Feb 1, 2012.

  1. Hyubie

    Hyubie Unique like everyone else

    Oct 15, 2010
    Massachusetts
    Herbert
    I don't know if it has been discussed before, but can someone tell me what's the diff between using an ND Filter versus adjusting the EV in-cam?

    Thank you. :smile:
     
  2. FastCorner

    FastCorner Mu-43 Veteran

    310
    May 28, 2011
    ND lets you control the amount of light captured for a given aperture/shutter/ISO. Useful for shooting with wide aperture in daylight (when you hit maximum shutter) or when you want to control the background lighting with a flash.
     
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  3. Hyubie

    Hyubie Unique like everyone else

    Oct 15, 2010
    Massachusetts
    Herbert
    Yes - but assuming you haven't reached maximum shutter yet, couldn't you shoot wide-open in daylight and set EV to -[something] and then check the histogram until it's to your liking?

    Or is this a stupid question? :smile:
     
  4. FastCorner

    FastCorner Mu-43 Veteran

    310
    May 28, 2011
    Not really. Negative EV compensation takes whatever metering the camera chooses and adjusts it down, which, for example, helps you control highlights if the camera's blowing them out. With an ND filter and zero EV compensation, you'll get the same exposure as without (within the range of adjustments still available for the lighting).
     
  5. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Fast lenses wide open in bright light result in over exposure even for the minimum shutter speeds and lowest ISO so EV won't help. ND filters will drop the light level to the point that exposure is not blown so still able to shoot wide open even in high light levels.

    EV can only shorten the shutter time so if the shutter time is at the minimum and exposure is still blown and you don't want to stop down the aperture (or can't drop ISO) then ND filters come to the rescue.
     
  6. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    Best way to think of it (maybe): a ND filter reduces the amount of light reaching the lens. It's a bit like turning down the sun or artificial light level. You would use a ND filter if the lighting is so bright that you can't get the shot you want without overexposure. An example would be really bright sunlight and you want to shoot at f/2 for shallow depth of field but at your lowest ISP setting the shutter speed you need is faster than your camera's fastest shutter speed. Another example would be wanting to capture motion blur, say moving water, but the shutter speed required at the aperture you want to use is too short to give you the amount of blur you want and using the shutter speed you want would give you an overexposure.

    EV alters your exposure from the meter's recommended exposure by either underexposing or overexposing the shot by a selected amount. You use EV when shooting at the recommended exposure won't give you the result you want, for example if the subject is back lit or you're shooting with snow as the background or some other situation where the standard metering results in an incorrect exposure.

    So, if there's too much light in the scene for you to be able to shoot the way you want to, you use a ND filter to overcome that problem. You use EV in order to correct your meter's recommended exposure when the problem isn't too much light but rather that the meter's recommended exposure isn't going to give you the result you want.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Declan97

    Declan97 Mu-43 Veteran

    379
    Feb 3, 2012
    Padang, Indonesia
    couldn't wait for tested the nd filters