ND filter on Voigtlander 25mm 0.95 (in bright light)?

JHM

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Hi fellow m43 users,

This weekend I picked up a almost new Voigtlander 25mm 0.95 at ebay. I'm fairly new to photography and was reading that it would be good to use a ND filter on the Voigtlander when shooting wide open (0.95) in bright light.

How is the Voigtlander best handled (wide open) in bright light?

Some advice is highly appriciated, many thanks!
 

bassman

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The problem is that you need a faster shutter speed than your camera has to get a proper exposure in the bright sunlight at f/0.95. As the table shows, if your camera only goes to 1/4000 and ISO 200, then you'll need a 5 stop ND filter at f/0.95.

The Sunny 16 rule tells us what the proper exposure is in bright sunlight: it's 1/(ISO) @ f/16.

So proper exposure in bright sunlight @ ISO 200 is any of the following:
1/200 @ f/16
1/400 @ f/11
1/800 @ f/8
1/1600 @ f/5.6
1/3200 @ f/4.0
1/6400 @ f/2.8
1/12,800 @ f/2.0
1/25,600 @ f/1.4
1/51,200 @ f/1.0
 

JHM

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Thank you, this is very helpfull. Still so much to learn. Let me see if I understand you correct. I'm planning to get an E-P5 which goes 1/8000, than I'll need a 4 stop ND(16) filter right?
 

bassman

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A 3 stop ND should bring your 1/8000s @ f/0.95 to an acceptable exposure on a bright sunny day. You figure it as follows:

The correct exposure on ISO 200 at f/0.95 is about 1/52,000s.
+1 stop = 1/26,000s
+2 stops = 1/13,000s
+3 stops = 1/6,500s

If you're thinking of getting a polarizer, note that it also acts as a neutral density filter of about 1-2 stops. In anything less than bright sunlight, this might suffice.
 

Edmunds

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Whatever you do, don't buy a crappy filter. Nothing worse than getting a $1000 lens and screwing a $20 filter on it.

If you will want to use a polarizer, I would first buy that and then think about ND filters, if you still need them.
 

rpringle

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I would vote for the ND filter first if you want to use your lens wide open in sunlight as it will give you the exposure you want. If you want to remove reflections in glass/water and/or darken your skies get both. Eventually you'll want to have both an ND filter or 2 and a polarizer. I'd suggest getting the filter size of the biggest lens you intent to buy and then buy step up rings so it will fit the rest of your lenses. Currently I'm using the Hoya HD and HMC brand filters and they work well with very little to no color cast. If I remember the Hoya ND8 3 stop is $30-50 and the ND400 9 stop is $50-$80. You can get B+W brand as well which are what all my UV filters are but they're usually about twice the price but perhaps worth it for a lens such as the Voigtlander.
 

Cruzan80

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All of the above implies you trying for a "neutral" exposure. The E-P5 has a fairly high dynamic range, which means it can handle quite a bit that is over/underexposed before losing detail. You may be able to get by with overexposing the scene, and then pulling it back in post.
 

jloden

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I'd recommend a (high quality) 3-stop ND filter personally. You'll get better quality at a more affordable price point than with a variable ND, and 3 stops is usually enough to get you within an acceptable range, especially if you have a camera with a 1/8000s max shutter speed.

I never did end up using an ND with the CV 25mm when I had it so I can't offer more specific tips on that lens, but I've used 3-stop NDs for other cameras many times for the same purpose and it seems to be about the sweet spot for shooting wide open in bright daylight.
 

kawhona

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I'd recommend a (high quality) 3-stop ND filter personally. You'll get better quality at a more affordable price point than with a variable ND, and 3 stops is usually enough to get you within an acceptable range, especially if you have a camera with a 1/8000s max shutter speed. I never did end up using an ND with the CV 25mm when I had it so I can't offer more specific tips on that lens, but I've used 3-stop NDs for other cameras many times for the same purpose and it seems to be about the sweet spot for shooting wide open in bright daylight.
Yes i have those but i dont shoot just m4/3 and use vari-n-trio alot on my ff gear but even Dr Singh @ Singhray told me there could be problems on mirrorless cameras and so far he is right havent been able to find a combination that works. 3step often is not enough for the type of shooting i do i want very long exposures.
 

jloden

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Yes i have those but i dont shoot just m4/3 and use vari-n-trio alot on my ff gear but even Dr Singh @ Singhray told me there could be problems on mirrorless cameras and so far he is right havent been able to find a combination that works. 3step often is not enough for the type of shooting i do i want very long exposures.
Sure... for long exposures I use a separate 10 stop filter. The 3 stop is just for shooting wide open in bright sunlight or when you're limited by flash x-sync speed, which is what the OP was asking about.
 

bassman

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This is far from a great shot, but it's using my VND to get 8 seconds @ f/11, ISO 200 on my E-M5 with the 12-35/2.8. Seems to work just fine. Can't see why mirrorless would make a difference for a VND compared to a DSLR; the mirror is up on the DSLR by the time the shot is made.

However, if all you're trying to do is get your SS down to 1/8000, then I agree a 3 stop ND is cheaper and simpler.
 

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kawhona

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This is far from a great shot, but it's using my VND to get 8 seconds @ f/11, ISO 200 on my E-M5 with the 12-35/2.8. Seems to work just fine. Can't see why mirrorless would make a difference for a VND compared to a DSLR; the mirror is up on the DSLR by the time the shot is made. However, if all you're trying to do is get your SS down to 1/8000, then I agree a 3 stop ND is cheaper and simpler.
Interesting bassman i get the cross on my vnd at all densities.
 
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