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NAS backup

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Speedliner, Sep 27, 2015.

  1. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    hi folks,

    I'm experimenting with a Netgear Readynas to replace my windows-based file server. Love the features, but not happy with backup options. I currently use CrashPlan which is inexpensive, but very reliable. There doesn't see, to be an affordable option for the NAS.

    Any NAS users out there, happy with an affordable solution?

    Thanks
     
  2. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Synology dual hot swap box DS212+, eBay for a little over $200. Two 4 TB drives, mirrored at about $100 each on sale. Rock solid, amazing software capabilities. With the mirroring I lose nothing if one drive fails.

    I back the critical stuff, around 1tb, about once a month onto an offline 5gb drive kept in my fire-resistant gun safe. This is backup against theft or physical destruction of the NAS box.
     
  3. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    You should be able to use just about any backup software on the market. Just use the SMB path of the NAS file share as your target for the backups.
     
  4. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    Old racer, I have drives mirrored, but want a cloud backup in case of fire or theft. Left that part out.

    Tk. Thanks. Requires a dedicated PC since even incremental runs take many hours.

    Readynas has there own cloud backup, but it's very expensive.
     
  5. Repp

    Repp Mu-43 Veteran

    498
    Jan 27, 2011
    Oak Harbor, WA
    I'm also using a Synology NAS. the DS712+ and the add-on DX213. This has also become my primary system for media streaming and storage. The original 2 bays would probably be more than enough for backups and photo/video storage... but once I started using it as a media server... things got a bit out of hand. It's a great system, rock solid, great GUI and iOS and android app support. I've had a few headaches with external access which I've mainly narrowed down to my router, but customer service and forums helped me work around it with ease. I can access it world wide and can even upload raw files via iPad when traveling if I don't want to take my laptop.
     
  6. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    Yes Repp, those are the features I love. Just want my life in pictures backed up off site somehow w/o costing a fortune.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2015
  7. Repp

    Repp Mu-43 Veteran

    498
    Jan 27, 2011
    Oak Harbor, WA
    Um, if it's just extra back-up for safety... have you thought about amazon? If you have prime, you have unlimited photo storage for raw or jpg. And if you don't need the rest of prime, you can get just the unlimited photo storage for $12 a year https://www.amazon.com/clouddrive/pricing?ref_=cd_lm_navpricing It's slow, and meant to be only a backup, but it's more secure than you're friend's apartment. Amazon also provides professional storage to businesses and IT companies, so it's a pretty stable operation.
     
  8. Repp

    Repp Mu-43 Veteran

    498
    Jan 27, 2011
    Oak Harbor, WA
    So, my full system is as follows:
    Laptop - Lightroom managed, favorites on disk, smart preview of everything else. Catalogue and adjustment info on laptop, but also saved to individual file folders with the original pictures.
    USB hard drive - backup of all photos in raw, can plug into laptop and reroute lightroom folders like normal when traveling
    NAS - Lightroom folders for all photos
    Amazon - upload files 1/month in raw format, same file format as my nas/usb hd.
     
  9. listers_nz

    listers_nz Mu-43 Veteran

    255
    Nov 22, 2013
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Simon
  10. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    the term headless scares me, but I'll take a look. Thanks.
     
  11. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    documents and videos too, but that would be a nice extra.
     
  12. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    So you want to back up FROM the NAS? I was assuming you wanted to back up TO the NAS.

    Honestly, that's pretty much going to need another NAS! :)

    The problem I have with the free prime storage is that it doesn't work for video, it doesn't have much respect for original folder structures, and it doesn't really work with normal backup software. So I can't really keep multiple versions or track changes. Flickr has free storage for both video and photo, but the same thing applies. It's a photo sharing site, not a backup site, so what you typically have as key backup features don't exist.
     
  13. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Sometimes the way we state our problems precludes a class of possible solutions. In my case I started looking at cloud backup and even opened an Amazon account, then I realized how slow it would be. Many days to just back up what I have because my DSL is relatively slow.

    In your case, you could buy a small fire-resistant strong box, bolt it to the basement floor, and put either just a cold spare SATA drive in there loose (my method) or a single drive hot spare NAS box connected to the network. In the case of Synology, their boxes have an automatic power-down when not in use so heat would probably not be a problem. Your backups would then be completely under your own control and you'd have no recurring costs. There are still hypothetical disasters that could affect the backup-in-the-basement but, for me, I see the probabilities as low enough to be ignored.
     
  14. Sejanus.Aelianus

    Sejanus.Aelianus Mu-43 Regular

    94
    Sep 28, 2015
    That's good advice. My own backup system is based on using old computers to host backup data on three backup drives (Primary, Secondary and Tertiary). As they're in different places, away from the main building, there's a very low risk of all three going down at the same time. In any case, there are also two portable backups that are updated irregularly.

    Thirty five years in IT taught me to use belt, braces, piece of string...

    :crying:
     
  15. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    I actually have an IOSAFE USB drive that I'm using as an external drive for backups on my Windows-based server. Its fire and water resistant. Not sure I can use it with the NAS natively for backup.

    I wasn't clear in the OP. I'd like to replace the Windows server with the NAS in order to gain the cloud and multi-device features that t provides as well as the easier maintenance and automated functions. The big gap in being able to do that is backing the NAS up. ReadyNAS has its own cloud backup but its very expensive. Crashplan has a headless workaround, but it isn't really supported. So that was the initial challenge.

    Current:
    - Windows Server for shared storage
    - IOSAFE on-site backup
    - Crashplan off-site backup.

    Desired:
    - ReadyNAS for shared storage
    - local backup (pref with IOSAFE)
    - off-site backup

    I read somewhere that Windows 10 actually has some sophisticated home server features, but a NAS seems simpler if I can get a satisfactorily survivable backup scheme going.
     
  16. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    I think a cloud-based solution is always a good 'extra backup' bet. Not only because it's truly off-site, but also because it's properly redundant. A single drive - hot or cold - is not secure. Mirroring RAID or two seperate but identical copies is the minimum I consider safe. My current scheme is internal backup to a second drive (2 copies of all key data), an external NAS for on-site backup (which does need updating as its currently full), and Backblaze as offsite backup.

    Ideally I'd set up a second NAS at a friend's place and have the two boxes Rsynch, giving me two easily accessible backups (one at home, one offsite) that I can realistically restore from within one day, and have the cloud as a worst case scenario.

    The 'recurring costs' are a bit of a non-issue considering most NAS boxes, with drives, will set you back over 500 bucks once you get into decent sizes 4 drive boxes (or even some of the 2 drive solutions), plus the cost of powering them, and the question of how many years they'll last before they're outdated (either hardware failure, performance issues, or simply hard drive space running out and hardware not supporting larger partitions, etc.), and you'll really want more than one NAS, or a secondary offsite system to be completely safe. That's where a service like Backblaze, Crashplan or even Amazon's Glacier (which Backblaze is going to start competing with with a different offering soon, currently in beta testing) can actually be pretty cost effective and safer.