My first wedding

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by Cederic, Aug 23, 2015.

  1. Cederic

    Cederic Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Nottingham
    My friend has overruled my comments on competence, capability, image quality and experience and demanded that I photograph her wedding.

    I'll take both my m43 bodies, and all my lenses. Any thoughts and suggestions on which should be primarily attached? Choices are:

    Panasonic
    - 20mm
    - 30-100 f2.8
    - 100-300

    Oly
    - 12mm
    - 45mm
    - 60mm macro

    I'm thinking the 30-100 is a no-brainer, so wondering whether to just go with the 12mm and get up close and personal with the other body?
     
  2. tyrphoto

    tyrphoto Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 25, 2014
    Seoul | NYC
    ㅇtㅈyㅅr
    FWIW, most wedding photographers I know that use FF Canon/Nikon use a bare minimum of a 24-70/2.8, 70-200/2.8 and typically a fast 85 (1.2/1.4) along with at least two bodies.

    With what you have, the 30-100/2.8 will probably remained glued to one of your bodies and it'll be up to you to decide when to use the 12/20/45 combo. I'd probably leave the 100-300 and 60 at home. If budget allows, I'd recommend picking up the O12-40/2.8 as it would make your kit more versatile for weddings and events. It would also allow you to basically leave the 12 and 20 at home and use just the 45 for portrait work.
     
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  3. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    Is the Panasonic the 35-100 or is there a 30-100 4/3s lens? Anyway, I would definitely put it on one body, and then have the 12 and 20 for the other one. One thing is I assume you are going to take group shots and I'd be concerned that 12 would be too wide and 20 might not be wide enough. I would also take the 60 for some nice close up artsy shots of the rings and things like that.

    I have shot a could of weddings without proper gear, training, or skill. I begged the bride and groom to hire someone else. They told me if I didn't do it they wouldn't have photos because they could not afford to hire a professional. I shot one entire wedding with a Canon 20D and a 50 1.8 and a kit zoom. The best piece of kit I had was a pro level flash, which proved invaluable. I practiced and practiced and practiced with that flash till I was fairly confident with what it would do. Without the flash and the ability to bounce and diffuse the light from it, I doubt I would have had much at all from the reception worth keeping.

    Best of luck to you and the couple.
     
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  4. EarthQuake

    EarthQuake Mu-43 Top Veteran

    836
    Sep 30, 2013
    20/1.7 on one body, swap it for the 45/1.8 for headshots, 12/2 for group shots
    35-100/2.8 on the other body
     
  5. ashburtononline

    ashburtononline Mu-43 Veteran

    394
    Jan 21, 2015
    New Zealand
    I photograph about 6 weddings a year .... the last 4 with m43. I used a 12-40 and 40-150 but I also found the Nocticron invaluable .... You MUST have two bodies as changing lenses is time consuming. I would not bother bringing the 100 - 300
     
  6. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    The 35-100 needs to be on a body.

    I would take the 12mm & 45mm to swap on the other body. I would also recommend renting a flash or two.

    FWIW, when I got married last year our photographer did the whole thing with a Nikon 84 f/1.4, and an UWA (not certain of the focal length). The 45mm will be great for headshots, the 12mm will be great for group shots, or shots capturing the atmosphere.

    I wouldn't bother with the 20mm. Focusing speed in low light is quite poor, and wedding photography is all about capturing moments. A passing glance, a smile or a laugh. You don't want to miss shots like that because your lens failed to focus quick enough.


    You don't want to be slowed down by your kit. Bring as little as possible with you so that you can have it on you at all times.
     
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  7. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    You don't mention what bodies you have, just saying one Panasonic and one Olympus says nothing, sorry. If you have a GH4 and E-M1 great, a G3 and E-PM1, well....

    I would concentrate on getting ready, ceremony, posed / semi posed groups, and candid shots to capture all the people at least. M4/3 is fine for a good part of an event. I ran into too many issues on dark dance floors and with flashes so I decided I would stick with my Nikon stuff for events. I'm not saying it can't be done, just that is didn't work for me.

    35- 100 probably on one body.
    Bring the 12 / 45 / 60 macro (only for rings, flowers, details) and get something between the 12 and 45 that will AF faster than the 20mm. My first option would probably be a 17mm for a 35mm angle of view. The 20mm is a fine lens but that and the 12 are probably what you would use on the dance floor and quick group shots, slow AF will not help.
     
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  8. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    I was asked to shoot a family wedding last year, and I suspect that over 80% of it was shot with the 12-40, and I had a bevy of glass with me. This was a backyard wedding, so long glass was not really needed, but I still think that the 12-40 was the lens of choice. I was less worried about glass than I was about light modifiers since I didn't want underexposed images or nuclear faces. Lumiquest served me quite well with a bounce and a softbox.

    Good luck (and remember to get there early),

    --Ken
     
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  9. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    What are the times for the wedding ceremony and the reception? Will you be shooting the bride and groom getting ready? What's the light like during those times? You have to figure out if you can shoot everything available light, or need additional light. You need a schedule for the day so that you know where you have to be when and if the time allotted for things like portraits and group shots are adequate. Are you doing a Bride and Groom shot? When are you doing it? Where will it be? Do you have time to find a good location? It's always a good idea to have some lights for fill.
    Your lenses are probably okay and the least of your problems.
     
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  10. DoofClenas

    DoofClenas Who needs a Mirror!

    949
    Nov 9, 2012
    Traverse City, MI
    Clint
    I shot two last year with the 12-40, 25 1.4, 75, and 7.5 (at the reception).
     
  11. Cederic

    Cederic Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Nottingham
    Not planning to make a habit of this, so trying to avoid buying kit just for the wedding.

    Some excellent insights and suggestions, thank you. I think a decent flash is going to be my biggest weakness - even if I buy/borrow one I've left myself little time to practice :(

    I'm pretty comfortable with timings, locations and the main shots the happy couple want from me, so it's trying to get the proper flavour of the day, all of the hats, dresses and people, and making sure I don't mess up the group photos.

    I forgot to mention that I have the vario-X 14-42, so that's an additional option. For outdoors stuff that's probably a sensible choice, for indoors I think I'd rather have faster glass and move myself if needed.

    Really appreciate the thoughts and input!
     
  12. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    I have used a lot of flash "tupperware" over the years and found the Lumiquest bounce and softbox to be easy to use if you can spare a stop or so of light. They did anice job of eliminating any harsh shadows, and I had no overexposed faces at close range. I did skip TTL since it was not giving me the results I wanted, but that is a choice that you can make after trying things out.

    Good luck,

    --Ken
     
  13. Cederic

    Cederic Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Nottingham
    Took some time to think about it, and splashed out on a nice flash. Should arrive tomorrow, so Saturday is 'learn how to use a flash' day - supports TTL and fill-in flash, so need to find out how to get the best out of it using it straight, bounced, and as fill-in.

    I have the horrible feeling it's going to be as large as the camera :)
     
  14. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    For outdoor fill flash (open shadows in the eye sockets & some catch lights) direct flash, no modifiers. When the flash is the primary light source, bounce with a white card for a reflector works well.
     
  15. Ulfric M Douglas

    Ulfric M Douglas Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 6, 2010
    Northumberland
    Subscribing to the thread, just to see the results.
    We've had similar threads here and on other forums and let me say there has never been a disaster and often the resulting photos are rather good.
     
  16. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    I think the flash is a good idea. Best of luck to you. I am no flash expert at all, but I bought an omnibounce for mine when I couldn't bounce it off the ceiling or wall and it helped a lot.
     
  17. Cederic

    Cederic Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Nottingham
    Well, wedding was yesterday. First, the stuff nobody told me:
    - It's physically hard work. Ok, maybe not to you pros, but 9.30am to 11.45pm with just 75 minutes break, stood up most of the time and.. my shoulders ache today. Admittedly joining in the dancing for four hours is my own fault :)
    - erm. That's pretty much it, the only real surprise. Apart from the cake:
    _-218-L.

    I'm physically and mentally shattered, but it's Aspergers causing the latter. Normally at weddings I survive for a couple of hours then go and hide for an hour or two. Not an option yesterday.

    Lens choices turned out very very simple. 35-100 for all the indoor stuff, 12mm for all of the outdoor stuff. Finding out that my shiny new flash doesn't work on my Panny G X 7 meant that became the outdoor camera, and the old camera got indoor duties. I'll check camera and flash firmware, see if I can get that sorted now that I'm back home and near to a PC.
    _-10-L.

    1783 photographs, of which 821 posted to the web. All 1783 RAWs and unprocessed JPGs are also going on a USB key for the happy couple (and their unhappy daughter, who has post-processing duties).

    _-511-L.

    Overall, seemed to go ok. They signed the register during the service in the chapel, which was a strict 'no photography', and the registrar fled the scene while I was photographing the couple+family, but they weren't concerned about that. No photograph of the rings, mainly because they arrived with the bride half an hour after the service should have started. But I got the bride+father going in, the bride+groom coming out, all the family shots, all the other group shots, a few of the couple themselves, the cake cutting, the first dance, the first proper dance, the being driven away on honeymoon and at least one photograph of every attendee. Except me.

    _-3-L.

    Thanks everyone for your thoughts and guidance. It did help, and the flash turned out to be utterly essential.

    _-453-L.

    The key shots needed to keep the parents happy: http://photos.stua.rts.co.tt/Social-Events/Emma-and-John-Highlights/
    The rest: http://photos.stua.rts.co.tt/Social-Events/Emma-and-John/

    And.. relax. :)
     
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  18. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    Yes it's a long day. Think about doing it with 4-5 pounds on each arm. :)
     
  19. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Ya did good. I would cull out every shot that had issues. Only show solid work.

    It is physically hard work. Even without acting like a guest.
     
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  20. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    Congratulations! Yes, it is quite physical work. Thankfully not as exhausting as shooting college football, but still hard. When I shot my first game, I had muscles ache that I did not know that I even had. And you generally do not need knee pads for weddings, at least I hope not. The last wedding I shot was more tiring than physically exhausting as I was up until 5:00 trying to get some shots up on the web with just a Chromebook. Wrong tool for the job.

    --Ken